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%i)hich  marks  especially  the 
Dinsions  ability  as  a  fight- 
ing  unit,yjas  the  crossing  of 
thcMeuse  Kisser  and  the 
establishment  of  a  bridge'- 
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History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


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THE 

OFFICIAL    HISTORY 


OF  THE 


FIFTH    DIVISION 

U.  S.  A. 


During  the  Period  of  its  Organiza- 
tion and  of  its  Operations  in  the 
European  World  War,   1917-1919 


The  Red  Diamond  (Meuse)  Division 


1919 

Published  by 

The  Society  of  the  Fifth  Division 

208  Ouray  Building,  Washington,  D.  C. 


Headquabters   Fifth   Dmsioif, 

A.  P.  O.  No.  745,  A.  E.  F.,  Luxembourg, 

June  1st,  1919. 

This  "Official  History  of  the  Fifth  Division,  United  States  Army,  during  the  period  of 
its  organization  and  of  its  operations  in  the  European  World  War,  1917-1919,"  is  published 
for  the  information  and  guidance  of  all  those  who  may  desire  to  inquire  into  the  record  of 
this  Division. 

By  command  of  Major  General  Ely: 

C.  A.  TaoTT, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


^':^ 


5 


6 


b 


Copyright,  1919 
The  Society  of  the  Fifth  Division 


El 


Wynkoop  Hallenbeck  Cravpford  Company 

Printers  and  Binders 

Eighty  Lafayette  Street 

Nevf  York 


JAN  !Si920 


©CLA561514 


PREFACE 

The  Fifth  Division  did  not  win  the  war.  In  submitting  the 
history  of  its  oj^erations  in  the  greatest  conflict  of  all  time  this  Division 
does  not  claim  that  it  is  the  all-important  American  division  ^vithout 
which  the  Allied  victory  could  not  have  been  won.  Acrimonious  dis- 
cussions as  to  which  of  the  gallant  units  of  the  American  Expedition- 
ary Forces  was  the  best  have  been  made  no  part  of  this  work.  Neither 
has  it  been  the  intention  to  sully  the  records  of  other  divisions  nor  to 
lessen  in  a  single  particular  the  honor  due  any  of  those  organizations 
whose  combined  efforts,  well  directed  by  Corps,  Army  and  General 
Headquarters,  led  to  the  greatest  achievement  that  has  ever  exalted 
American  arms. 

There  is  glory  enough  for  all.  The  Red  Diamond  Division 
desires  only  to  claim  its  just  share.  Reaching  France  in  the  spring 
of  1918,  the  various  units  were  assembled  in  training  areas,  and  after 
six  weeks  of  preliminary  instruction  entered  a  sector  of  the  Vosges 
front.  The  monotony  and  peace  of  those  formerly  quiet  mountain 
sectors  were  rudely  shattered  by  the  active  patrolling  and  frequent 
raiding  carried  out  by  our  men  from  the  time  of  their  introduction  to 
the  trenches.  The  brilliant  seizure  and  fortification  of  Frapelle  ended 
the  Fifth's  experience  in  trench  warfare. 

In  the  St.  Mihiel  operation  the  Fifth  Division  successfully 
reached  every  objective  on  scheduled  time,  advancing  seven  and  one- 
half  kilometers  and  captin-ing  many  prisoners  and  much  material.  It 
tarried  long  enough  in  the  sector  to  stabilize  its  lines  and  to  help 
clinch  the  drive  that  had  to  be  a  success. 

Then  the  Red  Diamond  entered  the  battle  between  the  Argonne 
and  the  river  jMeuse,  undertaking  one  of  the  most  difficult  tasks  that 
ever  faced  an  American  division.  In  the  fierce  and  continued  fighting 
that  finally  won  for  us  the  Bois  des  Rappes  many  a  man  earned  well 
the  name  of  hero.  Those  eleven  days  of  trial  and  exposure  and 
advance  under  terrible  concentration  of  enemy  artillery,  machine 
gun  and  rifle  fire  from  three  directions  served  as  the  furnace  in  which 
was  tested  and  tempered  the  metal  of  the  Fifth  Division. 

It  is  in  the  crossing  of  the  Meuse  and  the  rapid  conquest  of  the 
territory  eastward  that  the  Fifth  Division  lays  its  chief  claim  to  fame. 
It  is  that  achievement  which  gives  the  Fifth  its  name,  the  Meuse 
Division.  Wliile  the  eyes  of  America  were  following  the  speedy  ad- 
vance of  others  of  her  divisions  toward  the  famous  city  of  Sedan,  the 
Red  Diamond  men  forced  the  crossing  of  the  Meuse  river  and  the 
Canal  de  I'Est  in  the  face  of  dominating  heights  that  were  almost 


6  History  of  tlic  Fifth  Division 

impregnable  and  which  were  overcome  only  by  sheer  bravery  and 
Yankee  determination.  The  establishment  of  this  bridgehead  forced 
the  Germans  to  loosen  their  hold  on  the  whole  river  front  and  heights 
southward  for  a  distance  of  some  ten  kilometers  wliere  our  French 
allies  had  been  hammering  vainly  for  weeks.  This  has  been  character- 
ized by  the  Commander-in-Chief  as  "one  of  the  most  brilliant  military 
feats  in  the  history  of  the  American  Army  in  France."  The  Fifth 
Division  established  bridgelieads  for  both  her  neighboring  divisions, 
but  without  waiting  for  them  pushed  out  alone  over  the  heights  and 
through  the  Foret  de  Woevre,  liberating  eleven  villages,  advancing 
eighteen  kilometers  beyond  the  river  and  taking  nearly  two  hundred 
square  kilometers  of  territory  before  the  Armistice  stopped  the  vic- 
torious pursuit  of  the  enemy  which  the  Red  Diamond  had  vanquished. 

This  history  is  a  true  record  of  the  accomplishments  of  the  Fifth 
Division,  as  accurate  as  human  effort  can  make  it.  The  authorities 
are  the  field  messages,  battle  maps,  operation  rejiorts,  and  other  offi- 
cial documents  of  tlie  Division,  to  which  has  been  added  the  testimony 
of  many  of  the  officers  and  men  who  helped  to  achieve  the  deeds  herein 
recoimted.  There  are  doul)tless  minor  inaccuracies  and  inconsis- 
tencies; no  two  eye-witnesses  ever  see  alike;  moreover,  some  of  the 
important  actors  gave  their  lives  in  the  combat  and  many  have  left  the 
Division  since  hostilities  ceased.  Casualty  reports  are  the  latest  and 
the  most  authentic  obtainable.  The  list  of  men  missing  in  action  is 
necessarily  unsatisfactory,  but  it  has  been  brought  up-to-date  to  the 
time  of  publication  and  is  as  true  as  diligent  search  of  the  Statistical 
Section  can  make  it.  The  future  may  discover  the  fate  or  where- 
abouts of  some  of  our  missing  men,  but  the  corrections  brought  out  by 
time  will  be  only  minor  and  of  unimportant  detail. 

The  members  of  the  Fifth  Division  have  co-operated  willingly 
and  loyally  to  make  this  history  possible.  The  actual  work  of  com- 
piling the  material  and  writing  the  history  has  been  done  by  Second 
Lieutenant  Kenj^on  Stevenson,  Twenty-first  Field  Ai'tillery,  who 
has  devoted  months  of  careful  and  intense  studj^  to  the  task  of  verify- 
ing all  facts  and  setting  them  forth  in  tlie  most  interesting  manner 
possible.  The  maps  showing  the  operations  of  the  Division  are  the 
work  of  Regimental  Sergeant  Major  Willard  B.  Prince  of  the  G-2, 
General  Staff  Section.  The  photographs  were  taken  by  the  Signal 
Cor])s.  Aviation  Section,  and  tlie  Seventh  Engineers.  The  whole  has 
been  carefully  gone  over,  coi-rectcd  and  re\ise(l  by  a  board  of  officers 
appointed  for  the  purpose,  each  of  whom  has  been  a  member  of  the 
Division  during  most  of  its  stay  in  France. 


TABLE  OF  CONTENTS 

Page 

Preface ;. 5 

Poem — Red  Diamond 12 

Fifth  Division  Units • 15 

PART  I.    COMMAND  AND  ADMINISTRATION 

Major  General  John  E.  McMahon 17 

Major  General  Hanson  E.  Ely 19 

Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner 23 

Brigadier  General  Walter  H.  Gordon 27 

Brigadier  General  Paul  B.  Malone 29 

Brigadier  General  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler 31 

Brigadier  General  T.  B.  Dugan 35 

Brigadier  General  W.  C.  Rivers 37 

The  Fifth  Division  General  Stall' 38 

PART  II.     HISTORY 
Chapter 

I.    Organization  and  Training 19 

II.    Trench  Warfare — Frapelle 59 

III.  The  St.  Mihiel  Operation 85 

IV.  Winning  the  Bois  des  Rappes 127 

V.    The  Advance  to  the  Meiise 179 

VI.    Crossing  the  Meuse 199 

VII.   From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison 227 

VIII.    In  the  Army  of  Occupation 265 

IX.    Fifth  Field  ArtiUery  Brigade  after  St.  Mihiel 277 

PART  III.    APPENDIX 

1.  Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division 293 

2.  Winners  of  Decorations 316 

3.  Fifth  Division  Citations 321 

4.  Advances  and  Square  Kilometers  Gained 341 

5.  Materiel  Captured  by  Fifth  Division 341 

6.  Prisoners  Captured  by  Fifth  Division 343 

7.  Enemy  Units  Opposed  by  Fifth  Division 345 

8.  Tables  of  Fifth  Division  Casualties 347 

9.  Fifth  Division  Personnel  Taken  Prisoner 353 

10.  Fifth  Division  Personnel  Missing  in  Action 354 

11.  Armies  and  Army  Corps 356 

12.  Locations  of  Fifth  Division  Headquarters 357 

13.  Station  List  of  May  11,  1919 358 

14.  Battlefield  Monuments  of  the  Fifth  Division 360 

15.  The  Fifth  Division  Crest 363 

16.  Roster  of  Officers  Who  Served  with  Fifth  Division 365 

17.  Constitution  of  the  Society  of  the  Fifth  Division 419 


LIST  OF  MAPS  AND  PHOTOGRAPHS 
MAPS 

Opposite 
Page 

Training  areas,  battle  sectors  and  routes  of  travel  of  Fifth  Division 52 

The  Anould  Sector 60 

The  St.  Die  Sector 66 

The  Frapelle  Operation 76 

General  Map  of  the  St.  Miliiel  Operation 86 

Fifth  Division  Sector  in  the  St.  Mihiel  Operation 120 

Operations  of  the  Fifth  Division  west  of  the  Meuse • 180 

Operations  of  Fifth  Division  east  of  the  Meuse 236 

General  Map  of  the  Meuse-Argonne  Operations 254 

Enemy  Order  of  Battle  in  Meuse-Argonne  Operations 256 

Areas  held  by  Fifth  Division  in  Army  of  Occupation 272 


PHOTOGRAPHIC  PJ.ATES 

The  Crest  of  the  Fifth  Division,  U.  S.  A.  (in  colors)  Frontispiece 2 

Major  General  John  E.  McMahon 16 

Major  General  Hanson  E.  Ely 20 

Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner 24 

Brigadier  General  Walter  H.  Gordon 26 

Brigadier  General  Paul  B.  Malone 28 

Brigadier  General  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler 32 

Brigadier  General  Thomas  B.  Dugan 34 

Major  General  McMahon  and  his  Staff  after  the  St.  Mihiel  Operation 40 

Studying  the  Battle  Map  of  the  fighting  in  Bois  des  Rappes 44 

Preparing  for  re-entrance  of  Fifth  Division  into  Meuse-Argonne  fight 46 

Barracks  built  by  the  Seventh  Engineers 56 

An  emplacement  of  the  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  in  the  Vosges. . .  62 

Keeping  an  eye  on  the  Boche,  in  a  front-line  0.  P.  of  the  Sixth  Infantry. ...  66 
A  gun  of  Battery  D,  Twenty-first  Field  Artillery,  in  action  during  the  Frapelle 

engagement 72 

What  the  Huns  did  to  the  village  of  Neuviller-sur-Fave 76 

Vieville-en-Haye 88 

Regnieville-en-Haye 90 

Dugouts  at  St.  Jacques,  used  as  Division  P.  C.  in  the  St.  Mihiel  Drive 92 

Thiaucourt,  taken  with  many  prisoners  and  much  material 94 

Tenth  Brigade  P.  C.  during  the  St.  Mihiel  Drive 98 

The  Metz  Bridge 100 

The  sector  of  the  Fifth  Division  seen  from  airplane 104 


List  of  Maps  and  Photograpltti  9 

Opposite 
Page 

The  head  of  a  column  of  363  German  prisoners 110 

For  a  week  preceding  their  entrance  into  the  Meuse-Argonne  fight  the  men 

lived  in  the  Foret  de  Hesse 128 

It  took  strenuous  work  by  the  Seventh  Engineers  to  make  the  roads  passable.  130 

Ferme  de  la  Madeleine 1 32 

General  McMahon  and  members  of  Division  Staff 131 

Cunel ' 136 

Wooden  tanks  used  by  the  Germans 138 

More  than  six  hundred  of  the  Red  Diamond  men  had  fallen 110 

Bois  des  Rappes 1 12 

It  was  in  shell-holes  like  this  that  our  troops  lay  during  the  week  of  fighting 

around  Bois  des  Rappes Ill 

Bois  des  Rappes  as  "seen"  by  aero-camera 146 

The  troops  had  entered  the  areas  subjected  to  shell-fire  wlien  they  camped 

near  Nantillois 118 

Bethincourt,  near  Dead  Man's  Hill 150 

Buildings  on  Ferme  de  Madeleine,  where  Brigade  P.  ( '.'s  were  located       .  152 

Our  aero-squadron  helped  reconnoitre  the  enemy's  lines 158 

It  was  only  on  the  20th  that  the  rolling  kitchens  could  be  gotten  up  close 

enough  to  give  the  front-line  doughboys  a  feed  of  hot  "  Corned  Willie  " ...  162 

It  was  a  wonderful  feeUng  to  be  able  to  hunt  out  the  cooties 168 

Brieulles 180 

Even  a  stone  quarry  afforded  fine  shelter 182 

No  wonder  the  men  in  the  front  fines  had  to  exist  on  cold  chow 184 

Aincreville 186 

It  was  up  this  heavily  wired  slope  that  the  third  battalion  of  the  Sixth  Infantry 

had  to  charge  to  wrest  Cote  252  from  the  enemy 188 

Clery-le-Grand 190 

The  Meuse  valley  east  of  Brieulles  was  flat  and  open 192 

Clery-le-Petit 194 

The  Punchbowl  with  Doulcon  in  the  distance 196 

The  first  foot  bridge  across  the  river  Meuse 200 

Company  E  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  was  caught  in  the  open  river  bottom 202 

Where  part   of  Eleventh   Infantry  won    Liny-devant-Dun   and   southern 

slopes  of  HiU  260 204 

One  foot  bridge  across  the  canal,  at  the  site  of  the  old  bridge  destroyed  by 

the  Boche 206 

Dun-sur-Meuse  from  an  altitude  of  three  and  one-half  miles 208 

Not  many  prisoners  were  taken  in  our  fierce  assaults  but  those  who  were 

spared  were  forced  to  help  carry  back  our  wounded  men 210 

Site  of  foot  bridge  over  river  south  of  Clery-le-Petit 212 

Dun-sur-Meuse  on  its  round  topped  hill 214 

Liny-devant-Dun  and  Hill  260 216 

Milly-devant-Dun 218 


10  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

Opposite 
Page 

Prisoners  taken  in  the  fighting  around  Dun 220 

A  heavy  pontoon  bridge  was  constructed  at  Dun 222 

Repairing  one  of  the  bridges  in  Dun 224 

The  great  liill  called  Cote  St.  Germain 228 

Vilosnes 230 

Murvaux 232 

Lion-devant-Dun 234 

Fontaines 236 

BrandeviUe 238 

Remoiville 240 

Louppy 242 

Jametz 244 

Five  civilians  liberated  in  Louppy 246 

Mouzay 248 

Charmois  Chateau 250 

When  news  came  that  the  Armistice  would  go  into  effect 252 

The  first  mail  in  two  weeks 254 

A  few  of  the  guns  left  by  the  Germans 266 

Major  General  Hanson  E.  Ely,  Brigadier  Generals  Joseph  C.  Castner  and 

Paul  B.  Malone  and  their  staffs  at  Longuyon 268 

The   Sixth  Infantry  had  the  honor    of  becoming   the   garrison   of  Treves, 

Germany 270 

Longwy,  where  Germans  abandoned  large  stores  of  war  material 272 

One  of  the  Fifth  Division  battle  monuments 274 

Smoke  resulting  from  a  direct  hit  on  Boche  ammunition  dump 278 

Well-concealed  "  155  "  position  during  St.  Mihiel  drive 280 

Receiving  orders  at  a  well-concealed  gun  position 282 

Moving  up  a  "  forward  75  " 284 

Heavy  artillery  on  the  way  to  Germany 286 


"The  feat  of  arms  which  marks  especially  the  Division's  ability 
as  a  figliting  unit  was  the  crossing  of  the  Meuse  River  and  tlie 
establishment  of  a  bridgehead  on  the  eastern  bank.  This  opera- 
tion was  one  of  the  most  brilliant  military  feats  in  the  history  of 
the  American  Army  in  France."- — Extract  of  Letter  from  Gen- 
eral Pershing  to  Division  Commanderj  dated  April  30th,  1919. 


RED  DIAMOND 

Who  held  high  Violu's  tortured  mass 
And  guarded  well  each  mountain  pass 
That  linked  La  France  to  Belle  Alsace? 
Red  Diamond ! 

WIio  drove  the  Hun  from  out  Frapelle, 
Patrolled  him  out  of  l-'ontenelle, 
From  Ban-de-Sapt,  and  Plaine  near  Celles  ? 
Red  Diamond ! 

From  Regnieville  to  Souleuvre  Ferme, 
Thru  Bois  de  Claude,  des  Grandes  Portions, 
Who  forced  the  Huns  as  they  came  on  ? 
Red  Diamond ! 

Le  Bois  des  Rappes,  de  la  Pultiere, 
Cold  Andon  stream,  the   Clery  freres, 
Witnessed  the  valor  of  men  who  wear 
Red   Diamond ! 

Across  the  Meuse,  the  order  read, 
The  Army's  hosts  must  next  be  led; 
To  blast  the  way  the  Fifth  was  sped — 
Red   Diamond  ! 

Swam  river  and  canal,  and  stormed 
The  heights  on  which  the  Huns  were  formed; 
From  Dun  to  Remoiville  there  swarmed 
Red  Diamond ! 

The  thought  of  peace  stayed  not  their  hand; 
After  tlie  foe,  across  the  land. 
They  sped,  a  freeing,  fighting  band — 
Red  Diamond ! 

On  pine-clad  hills  among  tlie  Vosges, 
Near  Remberconrt,  and  where  Meuse  flows. 
In  glory  sleeps,  in  last  repose, 
Red  Diamond ! 

For  all  that  we  hold  high  and  dear, 
Each  facing  death  without  a  fear. 
Men  fought  to  keep  its  honor  clear — 
Red  Diamond ! 

The  diamond  cuts;  it  has  no  wear; 
Its  brilliance  sparkles  everywhere; 
The   jewel   prize,   in   stern   warfare — 
Red   Diamond ! 

— H.  P. 


PART  I 
COMMAND  AND  ADMINISTRATION 


THE  FIFTH  DIVISION 

Ninth  Infantry  Brigade: 
Sixtieth  Infantry. 
Sixty-first  Infantry. 
Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battahon. 

Tentli  Infantry  Brigade: 
Sixth  Infantry. 
Eleventh  Infantry. 
Fifteenth  JNIachine  Gun  Battalion. 

Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade: 
Nineteenth  Field  Artillery. 
Twentieth  Field  Artillery. 
Twenty-first  Field  Artillery. 
Fifth  Trench  Mortar  Battery. 

Seventh  Engineers. 

Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion. 

Ninth  Field  Signal  Battalion. 

Seventh  Engineer  Train. 

Fifth  Supply  Train. 

Fifth  Ammunition  Train. 

Fifth  Sanitary  Train: 

Field  Hospitals  17,  25,  29  and  30. 
Ambulance  Companies  17,  2.j,  2!)  and  30. 

Fifth  Headquarters  Troop. 

Fifth  Military  Police. 

Fifth  Mobile  Ordnance  Repair  Shop. 

Fifth  Mobile  Veterinary  Section. 

Service  Park  Units  Nos.  322.  393  and  395. 

U.  S.  Ai-my  Post  Office  No.  74.5. 

Sales  Commissary  Unit  No.  302,  Q.  M.  C. 

Clothing  Unit  No.  304,  Q.  M.  C. 

Salvage  Unit  No.  301,  Q.  M.  C. 

Mobile  Laundry  Company  No.  319,  Q.  M.  C. 

Clothing  and  Bath  Unit  No.  323,  Q.  M.  C. 

Bakery  Company  No.  322,  Q.  M.  C, 


MAJOR  GENERAL  JOHN  E.  McMAHON 


AJOR  General  John  E.  McMahon  became  the 
first  actual  Commanding  General  of  the  Fifth 
Division  when  he  assumed  command  at  Camp 
Logan,  Houston,  Texas,  on  January  1st,  1918. 
General  McMahon  directed  the  training  of  the 
Division  in  the  LTnited  States,  its  movement 
overseas  and  its  participation  in  the  fighting  in 
the  Vosges  sectors,  the  St.  Mihiel  Operation 
and  the  first  phase  of  the  Meuse-Argonne  battle. 
General  MclNIahon  was  born  in  New  York  on  the  eighth  of 
December,  1860.  After  taking  the  A.  B.  degree  at  Fordham  College 
in  1880,  he  entered  the  United  States  Military  Academy  in  1882. 
On  July  1st,  1886,  he  was  commissioned  a  Second  Lieutenant  in  the 
Fourth  Field  Artillery.  He  was  promoted  to  First  Lieutenant 
November  28th,  1892. 

During  the  Spanish-American  War,  Lieutenant  McMahon 
became,  on  May  12th,  1898,  a  Captain,  Assistant  Adjutant  General. 
He  graduated  from  the  Artillery  School  in  1898.  On  July  5th, 
1899,  he  became  a  Major  in  the  Thirty-first  Ir.fantry.  On  the  suc- 
cessful termination  of  the  Philippine  campaign,  in  which  Major  Mc- 
Mahon participated,  he  was  honorably  mustered  out  on  June  18th, 
1901,  having  meanwhile  been  appointed  Captain  of  Artillery  on 
January  25th,  1901. 

On  January  25th,  1907,  Captain  McMahon  was  promoted  to 
Major  in  the  Artillery  Corjis,  but  he  was  shortly  assigned  to  the 
Field  Artillery.  He  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  Lieutenant  Colonel 
on  May  3rd,  1911,  and  served  on  the  General  Staff  from  1911  to  1914. 
He  became  Colonel  on  June  3rd,  1916. 

Following  the  entry  of  the  United  States  into  the  World  War, 
Colonel  McMahon  was  appointed  Brigadier  General,  National 
Army,  on  August  29th,  1917,  and  assumed  command  of  the  167th 
Field  Artillery  Brigade  of  the  Ninety-second  Division,  at  Camp  Dix, 
New  Jersey.  General  McMahon  held  this  command  until  the  latter 
part  of  December,  when  he  was  directed  to  take  command  of  the 


17 


18  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

Fifth  Division,  Regular  Aniiy,  being  organized  at  Camp  Logan, 
Texas. 

General  McMahon  was  promoted  to  rank  of  Major  General 
on  February  Gth,  1018.  Under  his  direction  the  Fifth  Division  suc- 
cessfully completed  its  preliminary  training  in  the  quiet  Anould 
and  St.  Die  sectors  of  the  Vosges  Mountains  and  carried  out  its 
mission  in  helping  reduce  the  St.  Mihiel  salient  in  September,  1918. 

General  INIcMahon  was  relieved  of  command  of  the  Fifth  Divi- 
sion on  October  10th,  1918,  and  then  assigned  to  the  Forty-first 
Division. 


MAJOR  GENERAL  HAXSOX  E.  ELY 

A  military  organization  is  frequently  compared  to  a  machine, 
and  the  division  with  its  many  and  varied  units  falls  most  readily 
into  this  classification.  The  success  or  failure  of  such  a  machine  can- 
not be  attributed  to  individual  persons  or  units  for  they  form  but 
cogs  in  the  mechanism  of  the  structure.  Nevertheless,  upon  the  wise 
direction  of  the  efforts  of  that  machine  depends  the  degree  of  accom- 
plishment that  comes  to  the  division. 

Thus  was  the  glorious  achievement  of  the  Fifth  Division  made 
under  the  noteworthy  and  efficient  leadership  of  INIajor  General 
Hanson  E.  Ely.  General  Ely  was  the  man  who  had  the  ability  to 
co-ordinate  all  the  different  forces  of  his  division  and  to  employ 
them  at  their  maximum  capacity.  It  was  he  who  directed  his  troops 
where  pressure  meant  victory,  who  urged  weary  and  war-worn  men 
to  extra  effort  when  that  added  exertion  brought  sweet  gains  to  the 
Allied  cause  and  bitter  defeat  to  a  strong  enemy.  With  such  a  man 
as  its  commander  the  Red  Diamond  takes  its  place  among  the  best 
American  divisions  engaged  in  the  European  World  War. 

jNIajor  General  Ely  is  an  excellent  example  of  the  rise  of  younger 
men  to  power  in  crises,  for  he  is  only  fifty-two  years  of  age.  He  was 
born  in  Independence,  Iowa,  in  the  year  1867.  At  the  age  of  nine- 
teen he  entered  the  United  States  Military  Academy  at  West  Point, 
New  York,  where  he  was  graduated  in  1891. 

Upon  receiving  his  commission.  Second  Lieutenant  Ely  was 
assigned  to  the  Twenty-second  Infantry.  In  the  year  1897-98  he 
was  ^lilitary  Instructor  at  the  University  of  Iowa,  and  in  1898  was 
promoted  to  the  rank  of  first  lieutenant.    During  the  years  1899  and 

1900  Lieutenant  Ely  served  in  the  Philippines,  on  the  Staff  of 
General  Lloyd  Wheaton,  where  in  1899  he  was  also  in  command  of 
General  Funston's  Scouts. 

In  1901  came  a  second  promotion  and  Captain  Ely  was  assigned 
to  the  Twenty-sixth  Infantry,  serving  as  Adjutant  General  of  the 
Fourth  District  of  Southern  Luzon.     From  May  to  December  of 

1901  Captain  Ely  was  Adjutant  of  his  regiment.  From  1901  to  1903 
he  acted  as  recruiting  officer  in  Des  ]Moines,  Iowa,  and  he  was  in 
the  School  of  the  Line  and  Army  Staff  College  in  1905  and  1906. 
In  1907  Captain  Ely  had  charge  of  the  mapping  of  the  Philippine 
Islands.  From  1908  to  1912  he  served  as  INIajor  of  Philippine  Scouts. 
In  December,  1912,  Captain  Ely  was  transferred  to  the  Nineteenth 
Infantry,  with  which  he  remained  until  ]March,  1913,  M'hen  he  was 
promoted  to  a  majority  and  assigned  to  the  Seventh  Infantry. 

19 


Major  General  Hanson  E.  El//  21 

Major  Ely  particijjated  in  the  A'era  Cruz  Expedition  from 
jNIarch  to  Aug'u.st,  191-4.  and  from  Se2)teml)er,  1!)1.).  to  May,  191<>. 
was  at  the  ^Var  College.  Next  he  was  Chief  of  Start"  of  the  El  Paso 
District,  in  which  capacity  he  served  vmtil  January,  1917.  In  March. 
1917,  he  was  jjromoted  to  Lieutenant  Colonel,  but  was  unassigned. 

When  the  Ignited  States  entered  the  World  ^Var,  lieutenant 
Colonel  Ely  became  a  member  of  the  War  Department  Mission  which 
visited  the  English  and  French  Fronts  from  May  28th  to  July  1.5th, 
1917.  Upon  completion  of  the  Mission,  Lieutenant  Colonel  VAy 
was  made  Provost  Marshal  (xcneral  of  the  American  Exjjeditionary 
Forces,  remaining  in  that  position  till  August  iJOth,  1917.  AVhile 
serving  as  Provost  Marshal  General  he  was  promoted  to  be  Colonel 
and  detailed  to  the  General  Staff  on  August  .5th. 

On  Sejjtember  1st,  1917,  Colonel  Ely  became  Chief  of  Staff  of 
the  First  Division,  serving  in  that  capacity  when  that  division  took 
over  its  first  front-line  trenches  in  the  Luneville  sector  in  Octol)er. 
Colonel  Ely  was  given  command  of  the  Twenty-eighth  Infantry  on 
December  1.5th,  1917.  and  in  those  early  days  "northwest  of  Toul" 
he  directed  his  regiment  with  skill  and  ability.  AVhen  the  First 
Division  was  thrown  against  the  onrushing  Germans  north  of  Mon- 
didier  it  was  Colonel  Ely's  Twenty-eighth  Infantry  that  brilliantly 
seized  the  village  of  Cautigny  and  then  held  it  through  days  of  ter- 
rible counter-attacks  and  punishing  rejirisal  fire. 

July  12th.  1918,  Colonel  Ely  became  a  Brigadier  General  and  on 
the  1.5th  assumed  command  of  the  Third  Brigade  of  the  Second 
Division.  General  Ely's  l)rigade  was  in  the  Soissons  Offensive  from 
July  18th  until  July  21st.  and  the  St.  JNIihiel  Operation  of  September 
12-1 7th.  The  Third  Brigade  then  joined  the  Fourth  French  Army 
at  ]M<)nt  Blanc,  taking  part  in  the  fierce  engagements  there  between 
October  3rd  and  11th.  Under  the  leadership  of  General  Ely  the 
Third  Brigade  captured  more  than  seven  thousand  prisoners. 

On  October  13th  General  Ely  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of 
Major  General  and  on  the  17tli  he  joined  and  assumed  command  of 
the  Fifth  Division,  fighting  north  of  Montfaucon.  Under  his  com- 
mand the  Red  Diamond  Division  cajitured  Bois  des  Rappes,  forced 
the  crossing  of  the  Meuse  River  and  advanced  eighteen  kilometers 
eastward,  almost  to  Longuyf)n,  before  the  Armistice  stopped  hostil- 
ities. When  the  Third  Army  was  formed  for  the  occupation  of  (Ger- 
many, Major  General  Ely  was  designated  as  Commander  of  the  Line 
of  Communications.  His  division  was  stationed  in  Luxembourg  for 
the  performance  of  the  duties  of  maintaining  the  lines  of  connnunica- 
tion  for  the  Army  of  Occu]jation. 


oo 


Hist  or  11  of  the  Fifth  Division 


General  Ely  was  cited  by  the  First  Division  for  gallantry  in 
action  at  Cantigny.  and  again  by  the  Second  Division  for  the  Sois- 
sons,  St.  ^Nlihiel  and  Mont  Elanc  Offensives.  He  was  decorated  with 
the  Lesion  of  Honor  h\-  Mai'shal  Petain  and  has  been  awarded  four 
Croix  de  Guerres  with  palm.  General  Pershing  has  bestowed  upon 
him  also  tlie  Distingushed  Service  Medal. 


BRIGADIER  GENERAL  JOSEPH  C.  CASTNER 

Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner  commanded  the  Ninth 
Infantry  Brigade  in  all  its  operations  as  a  part  of  the  Fifth  Division, 
American  Expeditionary  Forces.  He  was  born  in  New  Brunswick, 
New  Jersey,  November  18th,  1869.  In  1891  he  was  graduated  from 
Rutgers  College  with  degree  of  Civil  Engineer.  On  August  1st,  1891, 
he  was  commissioned  Second  Lieutenant  in  the  United  States  Army 
and  assigned  to  the  Fourth  Infantry  for  duty.  He  has  since  been 
promoted  as  follows :  First  Lieutenant,  Fourth  Infantry,  April  28th, 
1898;  Captain,  Squadron  Philippine  Cavalry,  April  23rd,  1900;  Cap- 
tain, Fourth  Infantry,  February  2nd,  1901;  IVIajor,  Twenty-first 
Infantry,  August  27th,  1913;  Lieutenant  Colonel,  Sixth  Infantry, 
May  13th,  1917;  Colonel,  Thirty-eighth  Infantry,  August  5th,  1917; 
Brigadier  General,  Ninth  Brigade,  April  12th,  1918.  He  attended 
the  Infantry  and  Cavalry  School  in  189.5,  and  was  in  the  War  Col- 
lege in  1915. 

Prior  to  the  ^Vorld  War,  General  Castner  had  already  dis- 
tinguished himself.  While  a  Lieutenant  he  rendered  great  service 
to  the  American  Government  as  an  explorer  in  Alaska.  In  the 
Philippines,  for  his  services  with  the  Tagalog  Scouts,  he  was  pro- 
moted to  a  Captaincy  in  the  Philippine  Squadron  of  Cavalry,  which 
commission  he  held  until  receiving  a  captaincy  in  the  Regular  Army. 
Later  he  served  as  Constructing  Quartermaster  in  both  Honolulu 
and  in  Yellowstone  National  Park.  While  yet  a  CajJtain,  he  com- 
manded the  Second  Battalion,  Fourteenth  Infantry,  and  under  his 
training  that  battalion  made  an  unequaled  record  in  known  distance 
firing.  ^Miile  a  Major  he  was  Adjutant  General  of  the  National 
Guard  of  the  District  of  Columbia,  which  he  developed  to  a  high 
state  of  efficiency.  As  Colonel  of  the  Thirty-eighth  Infantry  he  in- 
stilled that  fighting  spirit  which  won  for  that  regiment  its  fame  as 
the  "Rock  of  the  Marne." 

As  Brigadier  General  he  took  command  of  the  Ninth  Infantry 
Brigade.  In  the  quiet  Anould  and  St.  Die  sectors  he  gave  the  units 
of  the  Brigade  effective  training  for  the  big  operations  that  were  to 
follow.  In  the  St.  Mihiel  Offensive,  General  Castner's  brigade  was 
at  first  in  reserve  with  the  Tenth  Brigade  in  line.  When  passage 
of  lines  was  made  he  pushed  his  outpost  lines  up  near  to  the  Hinden- 
burg  Line.  In  the  first  phase  of  the  Meuse-Argonne  Offensive  his 
Brigade  cajitured  Cunel  and  drove  the  enemy  from  the  Bois-de-la- 
Pultiere  and  the  northwestern  Bois-de-Foret.  In  the  second  phase 
of  the  Meuse-Argonne  Offensive  General  Castner's  Brigade  cap- 

23 


Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner  25 

tured  Aincreville,  Clery-le-Grand,  Clery-le-Petit,  Bois  de  Babie- 
mont,  the  Punchbowl  and  Doulcon.  Then  the  Brigade  forced  the 
difficult  crossing  of  the  river  IMeuse  and  fighting  northward  captured 
in  succession  Dun-sur-Meuse,  Milly-devant-Dun,  Lion-devant-Dun, 
Cote  St.  Germain,  Charniois  Chateau,  Mouzay,  and  the  Foret-de- 
Woevre. 

In  appreciation  for  his  services  in  the  Meuse-Argonne  Opera- 
tion, General  Castner  was  awarded  the  Distinguished  Service  Medal. 
He  has  been  cited  in  Fifth  Division  Orders.  General  Castner  is  a 
man's  man,  a  soldier  and  a  leader.  In  mental  and  physical  alertness, 
in  devotion  to  duty,  in  zeal  and  energy,  he  is  an  examjjle,  alike  to  men 
and  officers.  There  is  no  man  in  his  brigade  who  will  not  gladly  join 
him  at  any  time  for  any  duty.  While  his  brigade  formed  part  of 
the  Ai'my  of  Occujjation,  General  Castner  took  the  course  of  instruc- 
tion at  the  Ai-mv  Center  of  Artillerv  Studies  at  Trier,  Germany. 


MAJOR  GENERAL  WALTER  H.  GORDON 

Major  General  Walter  H.  Gordon  took  command  of  the  Tenth 
Infantry  Brigade  at  the  time  of  its  organization  as  a  part  of  the 
Fifth  Division  and  commanded  it  throughout  its  training  period  and 
the  trench  warfare  of  the  Vosges  sectors.  He  was  horn  June  24th, 
1863,  in  Mississippi.  He  entered  the  United  States  IVIilitary  Acad- 
emy in  1882  and  was  commissioned  Second  Lieutenant  of  the  Twelfth 
Infantry  on  July  1st,  1886. 

Lieutenant  Gordon  was  promoted  to  First  Lieutenant  of  In- 
fantry on  Xovemher  30th,  1892.  During  the  Sjianish- American 
War  he  became,  on  June  29th,  1898,  Major  of  the  First  Delaware 
Infantry.  On  Septem])er  21st  he  was  promoted  to  Colonel  of  that 
regiment,  and  at  the  close  of  hostilities  he  was  honorably  mustered 
out.    Promotion  to  Captain  of  Infantry  came  INIarch  2nd.  1899. 

From  1907  to  1909  Cajitain  Gordon  was  a  member  of  the  Gen- 
eral Staff.  He  was  promoted  to  Major  on  March  23rd,  1909.  From 
April  2nd,  1910,  to  August  ll-th,  1913,  Major  Gordon  served  as 
Inspector  General.  He  was  promoted  to  Lieutenant  Colonel  of  In- 
fantry on  September  13th,  1914.  In  that  year  he  was  at  the  Army 
War  College.    On  July  1st,  1916.  he  was  promoted  to  rank  of  Colonel. 

Colonel  Gordon  was  made  Brigadier  General,  National  Army, 
on  August  31st,  1917.  He  took  command  of  the  Tenth  Infantry 
Brigade,  organized  from  the  Sixth  and  Eleventh  Infantry  at  Camp 
Forrest,  Georgia,  on  December  1st,  1917. 

^Vliile  the  Fifth  Division  was  occupying  the  St.  Die  sector 
General  Gordon  was  placed  in  direct  command  of  an  operation  to 
capture  the  village  of  Frapelle  in  the  valley  of  the  Fave  River,  above 
St.  Die.  The  operation  was  brilliantly  carried  out  by  the  Sixth 
Infantry  on  /August  17th,  1918,  according  to  General  Gordon's 
plans.  General  Gordon  was  promoted  to  rank  of  Major  General  on 
August  26th  and  left  the  Tenth  Brigade  to  assume  command  of  the 
Sixth  Division. 


27 


BRIGADIER  GENERAL  PAUL  B.  MALONE 

Brigadier  General  Paul  B.  Malone  came  to  the  Fifth  Division 
just  after  it  had  completed  its  training  in  the  quiet  sectors  of  the 
Vosges.  With  that  same  vigor  and  forceful  ability  that  had  char- 
acterized his  command  of  the  Twenty-third  Infantry  of  the  Second 
Division  in  its  operations  in  the  summer  of  1918,  General  Malone 
led  the  Tenth  Infantry  Brigade  through  the  St.  Mihiel  Offensive, 
the  taking  of  Bois  des  Rappes,  the  crossing  of  the  Meuse,  the  drive 
across  the  heights  to  the  Loison  River  and  during  the  Army  of  Occu- 
pation. 

General  Malone  was  born  at  ISIiddletown,  New  York,  May  8, 
1872.  He  was  graduated  from  the  LTnited  States  INIilitary  Academy 
and  appointed  Second  Lieutenant,  Thirteenth  Infantry,  June  2nd, 
1894.  In  April,  1898,  he  was  promoted  to  First  Lieutenant,  Thir- 
teenth Infantry.  During  the  Santiago  Campaign  in  1898,  Lieuten- 
ant Malone  served  as  a  staff  officer  in  General  Wikof's  brigade  of 
General  Kent's  Division.  From  1899  to  1901  he  served  as  Staff 
Officer  and  in  command  of  troops  in  the  Philippines. 

He  was  promoted  to  rank  of  Captain  in  1901,  and  from  1901  to 
190.5  was  Instructor  in  the  Department  of  Chemistry  at  West  Point. 
Captain  Malone  was  with  the  Twenty-seventh  Infantry  in  Cuba  in 
1906,  where  he  served  as  Provost  Marshal  and  later  as  Judge  Advo- 
cate in  the  Army  of  Cuban  Pacification,  1906-1908.  He  was  honor 
graduate  of  the  Army  School  of  the  Line  in  1909  and  a  graduate  of 
the  Army  Staff  College  in  1910.  In  1911  and  1912  he  was  on  the 
General  Staff  at  Washington,  D.  C.  From  1913  to  1916  he  served 
with  the  Second  Infantry  at  Honolulu,  Hawaiian  Islands. 

July  12th.  1916,  Captain  Malone  was  promoted  to  Major,  and 
became  Chief  of  Staff  of  Eagle  Pass  District,  Texas,  where  he  served 
till  January,  1917.  He  was  promoted  to  be  Lieutenant  Colonel  on 
June  26th,  1917,  and  was  officer  in  charge  of  Training  Camps  in  the 
Central  Department  until  July,  1917. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  IMalone  joined  the  A.  E.  F.  in  July,  1917, 
and  became  a  member  of  the  Operations  Section,  General  Staff, 
G.  H.  Q.  He  was  promoted  to  be  Colonel  August  5th,  1917,  and 
became  Chief  of  the  Traning  Section  of  the  General  Staff,  G.  H.  Q., 
in  which  capacity  he  served  until  February  12th,  1918. 

Colonel  IVIalone  then  took  command  of  the  Twenty-third  In- 
fantry, of  the  Third  Brigade.  Second  Division.  He  skillfully  com- 
manded that  regiment  in  its  training  and  in  the  Sommedieu  sector, 

29 


30  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

in  the  Chateau-Thierry  Operations  and  in  the  Aisne-Marne  Offensive 
between  Soissons  and  Rheims. 

On  August  25th,  1918,  Colonel  Malone  took  command  of  the 
Tenth  Infantry  Brigade,  Fifth  Division.  Under  his  leadership  the 
Tenth  Brigade  made  its  drive  of  nearly  eight  kilometers  in  the  St. 
IVIihiel  Offensive,  and  in  the  Meuse-Argonne  Offensive  gloriously 
captured  the  Bois  des  Rappes,  forced  the  difficult  crossing  of  the 
river  Meuse  and  rapidly  cleai'ed  the  eastern  heights,  taking  the  vil- 
lages of  Brieulles,  Liny-devant-Dun,  Fontaines,  Vilosnes,  Brande- 
ville,  Jametz,  Reinoiville  and  Louppy  and  penetrating  eighteen  kilo- 
meters beyond  the  Meuse  before  the  Armistice  stopped  hostilities. 
He  was  appointed  Brigadier  General  October  1st,  1918. 

General  Malone  was  cited  in  Orders  of  the  Tenth  French  Corps 
and  of  the  French  Army  of  the  Xorth  and  Northeast.  He  was  also 
cited  by  the  Second  Division  and  by  the  Fifth  Division.  He  was 
made  an  Officer  of  the  Legion  of  Honor  by  the  French  Government 
and  received  the  Croix  de  Guerre  with  two  palms  and  one  gold  star. 
For  his  able  and  meritorious  services  with  the  Fifth  Division  Gen- 
eral Malone  was  awarded  the  Distinguished  Service  Medal. 


MAJOR  GENERAL  CLEMENT  A.  F.  FLAGLER 

Major  General,  then  Colonel,  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler  was  com- 
mander of  the  Seventh  Engineer  Regiment  during  its  early  training 
period  in  the  United  States,  and  of  the  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade 
from  the  time  of  its  organization,  through  the  St.  Mihiel  operation 
of  Septemher,  1918,  to  October  9,  1918.  He  was  born  in  Georgia  on 
August  17th,  1867.  After  receiving  a  B.  S.  degree  at  Griswold 
College  in  1885  he  entered  the  United  States  IVIilitary  Academy  at 
West  Point.  New  York. 

On  June  12th,  1889,  he  became  an  additional  Second  Lieuten- 
ant of  Engineers,  and  on  April  1st,  1890,  was  appointed  Second 
Lieutenant  of  Engineers.  Lieutenant  Flagler  attended  and  grad- 
uated from  the  Engineer  School  of  Api^lication  in  1892.  He  was 
promoted  to  First  Lieutenant  October  4th,  189-t. 

During  the  war  with  Spain,  Lieutenant  Flagler  was  appointed 
temporary  Major  of  Engineers  on  June  8th,  1898.  His  promotion 
to  grade  of  regular  Captain  came  July  5th,  1898.  On  December 
31st,  1898.  he  was  given  honorable  discharge  as  temporary  JNLijor. 
Captain  Flagler  was  promoted  to  Major  on  May  .5th,  190(5,  and  on 
February  27th,  1913,  to  Lieutenant  Colonel.  He  was  in  the  Army 
War  College  in  1914. 

After  America's  declaration  of  war  on  Germany  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Flagler  was  appointed  Colonel  on  iNIay  1.5th,  1917,  and 
when  the  Seventh  Engineers  were  organized  in  July  Colonel  Flagler 
became  Commanding  Officer  of  the  neAv  regiment.  In  December 
the  Seventh  Engineers  were  assigned  to  the  Fifth  Division  just  be- 
ing organized.  Then  Colonel  Flagler  was  directed  to  take  command 
of  the  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade,  organized  with  the  Nineteenth, 
Twentieth  and  Twenty-first  Field  Artillery  at  Camp  Stanley,  Leon 
Springs,  Texas. 

Colonel  Flagler  assumed  command  of  the  brigade  on  December 
31st.  1917,  receiving  the  rank  of  Brigadier  General  on  February  7th, 
1918.  General  Flagler's  brigade  did  not  sail  for  France  until  May, 
1918,  a  month  later  than  the  Infantry  Brigades  of  the  Fifth  Division. 
The  Artillery  Brigade  proceeded  to  Camp  la  Valdahon  for  instruc- 
tion and  then  joined  its  division  in  the  St.  Die  sector  of  the  Vosges. 
General  Flagler  commanded  the  Fifth  Division  Artillery  during  the 
St.  Mihiel  Operation  and  when  the  Fifth  Division  moved  out  of  the 
sector,  the  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  w^as  detached  and  became 
Sector  Artillery. 

'31 


Major  General  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler  33 

Genei-al  Flagler  was  relieved  of  command  of  the  Fifth  Field 
Artillery  Brigade  on  October  9th,  1918,  and  was  given  command 
of  the  Third  Corps  Artillery.  He  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of 
Major  General  on  October  17th,  1918,  and  later  took  command  of 
the  Forty-second  DiAision. 


BRIGADIER  GENERAL  THOMAS  B.  DUGAN 

Brigadier  General  Thomas  B.  Dugan  was  born  in  Baltimore, 
jMaryland,  on  Jnly  27,  1858.  He  entered  the  U.  S.  jNIilitary  Academy 
and  graduated  with  the  class  of  1882,  being  assigned  to  the  10th  Cav- 
alry as  an  additional  Second  Lieutenant  on  June  13,  1882.  His  next 
assignment  was  to  the  3d  Cavalry  as  Second  Lieutenant  on  June  26, 
1882.  Promotion  to  First  Lieutenant  came  on  October  29,  1888, 
and  to  Captain  on  July  9,  1898,  being  assigned  to  the  7th  Cavalry 
on  the  same  date.  He  transferred  to  the  12th  Cavalry  on  March  8, 
1901.  He  received  his  Majority  and  assignment  to  the  4th  Cavalry  on 
October  28,  1906,  and  transferred  back  to  the  12th  Cavahy,  December 
19,  1906,  but  on  September  17,  1911,  was  reassigned  to  the  4th  Cav- 
alry. His  promotion  to  Lieutenant  Colonel.  Cavalry,  came  on  July 
30.  1912.  On  June  10,  1913,  he  was  assigned  to  the  6th  Cavalry,  and 
was  promoted  to  Colonel  on  December  o,  1915,  and  was  in  com- 
mand of  the  9th  Cavalry,  stationed  in  the  Philippines,  when  war  on 
Germany  was  declared. 

General  Dugan  served  in  Ai'my  Posts  in  Arizona,  Colorado, 
Oklahoma,  Texas  and  Missouri  until  1898.  He  participated  in  the 
campaign  against  Santiago,  Cuba,  in  1898,  in  the  battle  of  San  Juan 
July  1-3,  1898,  and  the  siege  of  Santiago.  He  served  in  Cuba 
in  1901  and  in  the  Philippines  in  1905  and  1916. 

Colonel  Dugan  was  appointed  Brigadier  General  August  25, 
1917,  and  returned  to  tlie  States  on  October  3.  1917.  exercising  com- 
mand as  follows: 

161st  Depot  Brigade,  86th  Division,  October  to 
December,  1917. 

Brigade    and    Field    Officers    School,    December, 
1917,  to  May,  1918. 

169th  Infantry  Brigade,   85th  Division,  May  to 
October,  1918. 

70th  Infantry  Brigade,  35th  Division,  October  to 
December,  1918. 

35th   Division,    December,    1918,    to    May,    1919. 

10th    Infantry    Brigade,    5th    Division,    May    to 
July,  1919, 

35 


36  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

Brigadier  General  Dugan  went  overseas  with  the  85th  Division, 
in  command  of  the  169th  Infantry  Brigade,  and  was  decorated  with 
the  Distinguished  Servce  Medal  by  the  Commander-in-Chief.  He 
returned  to  the  United  States  in  command  of  the  10th  Infantry  Bri- 
gade, 5th  Division,  on  July  26,  1919,  and  shortly  after  his  arrival 
was  relieved  of  that  command  and  placed  in  command  of  the  Over- 
seas Replacement  Depot,  Camp  Meade,  Maryland. 


BRIGADIER  GENERAL  WILLIAM  C.  RIVERS* 

Brigadier  Genei'al  William  C.  Rivers  commanded  the  Fifth 
Field  Artillery  Brigade  during  the  latter  period  of  its  occupation 
of  the  old  St.  Mihiel  sector  and  in  the  Army  of  Occupation.  He 
was  born  in  Tennessee  on  January  11th,  1866.  He  entered  the  Mili- 
tary Academy  at  West  Point  in  1883,  and  on  June  12th,  1887,  was 
commissioned  Second  Lieutenant  of  the  First  Cavalry. 

Lieutenant  Rivers  was  promoted  to  First  Lieutenant  of  Cav- 
alry on  August  18th,  1894,  and  to  Captain  February  2nd,  1901. 
Dm-ing  1903  and  1904  he  was  on  the  General  Staff.  Promotion  to 
Major  came  March  11th,  1911,  and  to  Lieutenant  Colonel  and  Col- 
onel of  Cavahy  on  July  1st,  1916. 

Colonel  Rivers  was  promoted  to  Brigadier  General  and  assigned 
to  conmiand  the  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  on  October  14th, 
1918.  On  March  10th,  1919,  he  was  relieved  of  command  to  return 
to  the  United  States. 


*No   portrait   of   Brigadier   General   William   C.  Rivers  was  available  at  time  of  publication. 


THE  GENERAL  STAFF 

AVliile  the  command  of  the  Division  is  exercised  by  the  Com- 
manding General,  nevertheless  it  is  impossible  for  one  man  to  study, 
understand  and  execute  all  the  details  that  enter  into  the  exercise  of 
command  and  leadershijj.  Accordingly,  to  assist  him  in  his  task, 
the  Division  Commander  has  a  group  or  staff  of  exjierts. 

The  Commanding  General  concerns  himself  with  the  broader 
and  more  important  questions  of  tactics  and  strategy  and  the  military 
policy  of  his  division.  In  order  to  relieve  him  of  all  details  concerned 
with  the  running  of  the  smaller  units  and  to  give  him  ample  oppor- 
tunity to  study  the  broader  aspects  of  operations,  training,  adminis- 
trative j^olicy,  etc.,  the  Cxcneral  Staff  is  provided. 

The  one  purpose  of  this  staff  is  to  assist  the  commander  in  his 
misson,  and  the  whole  team  fimctions  with  the  harmony  and  effective- 
ness of  a  theoretical  single  mind.  Everj-  phase  of  activity  of  the 
division  comes  under  the  General  Staff'  in  some  form  or  through  some 
chain  of  authority.  A  staff  officer,  as  such,  gives  no  orders  in  his 
own  name,  luit  he  must  be  prepared  to  make  prompt  decisions  and 
give  effective  orders  in  the  name  of  and  in  accordance  with  the  will 
and  purpose  of  the  Commanding  General. 


The  Chief  of  Staff 

At  the  head  of  the  General  Staff  Group  is  the  Chief  of  Staff. 
This  officer  assists  his  Comamnding  General  in  the  supervision  and 
co-ordination  of  the  command.  He  is  the  dependence  of  his  com- 
mander for  accurate  information  as  to  the  position,  strength  and 
movements  of  any  part  of  the  command;  the  state  of  supply  and 
ammunition  and  the  facilities  for  their  renewal;  the  losses  that  have 
been  sutt'ered  and  gains  that  are  expected;  the  fatigue  and  hardships 
that  have  been  undergone;  and  the  effective  strength  of  the  conmiand 
in  morale  and  numbers.  He  relieves  the  commander  of  much  that  is 
unimportant  and  prepares  matters  for  the  decision  of  the  commander, 
laying  his  own  views  frankly  before  him.  The  Chief  is  responsible 
for  the  whole  working  of  the  Staff,  that  it  functions  without  friction 
and  according  to  the  regulations. 

The  Fifth  Division  has  had  three  Chiefs  of  Staff.  Colonel  Ralph 
E.  Ingram  held  that  position  throughout  the  early  period  of  organ- 
ization and  training  in  the  United  States  and  in  the  Bar-sui'-Aube 

38 


The  General  Staff  39 

area  of  France.  Colonel  Howard  R.  Hickok  succeeded  Colonel  In- 
gram and  performed  the  duties  of  Chief  of  Staff  through  the  month 
of  Jmie,  1918,  and  until  July  18th,  when  he  was  promoted  to  rank 
of  Brigadier  General  and  relieved.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Robert  G. 
Peck,  Division  Inspector,  was  then  detailed  as  Acting  Chief  of  Staff. 

Throughout  the  major  part  of  the  Fifth  Division's  activities, 
dui-ing  its  oiJerations  in  the  St.  Mihiel  Offensive  and  the  Meuse- 
Argonne  fighting  and  in  the  Army  of  Occupation,  the  General  Staff 
has  been  headed  by  Colonel  Clement  A.  Trott,  who  took  up  his  duties 
on  July  2J.th,  1918.  For  his  meritorious  and  distinguished  services 
as  Chief  of  Staff  of  the  Fifth  Di\'isiori,  Colonel  Trott  was  decorated 
hy  General  Pershing  with  the  Distinguished  Service  Medal,  and  with 
the  Legion  of  Honor  and  the  Croix  de  Guerre  by  the  French  Re- 
jjublic. 

Under  the  Chief  of  Staff  there  are  three  sections  of  the  General 
Staff,  each  supervised  by  an  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff.  The  Chiefs 
of  Sections  are  si^ecialists  for  their  own  departments,  but  are  also 
officers  of  wide  exjierience  and  tactical  training  and  are  capable  of 
handling  the  work  of  any  section  in  emergency. 

The  First  Section.   G-1 

The  First  Section,  familiarly  termed  G-l,  may  be  called  the  Ad- 
ministrative and  Supply  Section.  The  detailed  duties  of  this  depart- 
ment include:  Sujiervision  and  achninistration  of  supply;  control  of 
tecluiical  troops  in  construction  work;  responsibility  for  records,  re- 
placements, supply  transportation,  communications,  signal  lines,  sani- 
tary service,  shelter,  police,  labor  and  custody  of  prisoners  of  war, 
traffic,  evacuations,  salvage,  postal  service,  captured  material,  billets, 
comforts,  bui-ial,  and  supervision  of  militarized  societies. 

Services  and  technical  troops  furnished  the  G-l  Section  of  the 
Division  to  assist  in  the  performance  of  its  task  are  as  follows: 

1 .  Administration : 

The  Adjutant  General's  Department. 
The  Judge  Advocate's  Department. 
The  Inspector  General's  Department. 

2.  Technical: 

Quartermaster  Corjis. 
Medical  Department. 
Corps  of  Engineers. 


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The  General  Staff  41 

2.  Tecluiical — Continued: 

Signal  Corps. 
Ordnance  Department. 
Chemical  Warfare  Service. 
Transportation  Service. 
Motor  Transport  Corps. 
Militarj'  Police  Corps. 

3.  Militarized  Societies: 

The  Red  Cross. 

Young  Men's  Christian  Association. 

Young  Women's  Christian  Association. 

Knights  of  Columbus. 

Salvation  Army. 

Major  John  Randolph  was  the  fii'st  G-1  of  the  Fifth  Division. 
He  was  succeeded  on  June  8th,  1918,  by  Major  Martin  C.  Shallen- 
berger,  who  continued  in  office  until  the  beginning  of  the  fight  for 
Bois  des  Rappes.  On  October  16th  Lieutenant  Colonel  Stephen  C. 
Reynolds  became  G-1,  and  served  in  that  capacity  through  the  Meuse- 
Argonne  Operations  and  in  the  Army  of  Occupation.  On  January 
20th,  1919,  Lieutenant  Colonel  Reynolds  was  relieved  and  Lieuten- 
ant Colonel  E.  J.  Ely  was  named  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1. 
Assistants  in  the  office  of  G-1  during  the  period  of  fighting  and  in 
the  Ai"my  of  Occu^iation  were:  Captains  Howard  B.  Payne,  George 
Hains,  C.  E.  Muchmore,  and  Lawrence  B.  Glasgow,  and  First 
Lieutenant  J.  L.  Cawi;hon, 

Heads  of  Departments  functioning  under  the  G-1  Section  have 
been: 

Division  Adjutant: 

Lieutenant  Colonel  David  P.  Wood. 

Division  Judge  Advocate: 

Lieutenant  Colonel  P.  James  Cosgrave. 

Division  Inspector: 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Robert  G.  Peck. 
Colonel  Robert  B.  McBride. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Wallace  McNamara. 
Major  Jacob  C.  R.  Peabody. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  W.  H.  Cowles. 


42  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

Division  Quartermaster : 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Ward  Dabney. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Charles  A.  Meals. 
Major  George  W.  Rees. 

Division  Surgeon: 

Colonel  Robert  H.  Pierson. 
Colonel  Carey  J.  Vaux. 

Division  Engineer : 

Colonel  Lewis  H.  Adams. 
Colonel  Earle  G.  Paules. 

Division  Machine  Gun  Officer: 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Gilbert  M.  Allen. 

Division  Signal  Officer:  ' 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Charles  F.  Leonard. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Alvin  G.  Gutensohn. 
Major  Dean  B.  Small. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  John  Scott. 

Division  Ordnance  Officer: 

Major  Thomas  G.  Hayes. 
Major  James  Stewart. 

Division  Motor  Transport  Officer: 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Harry  E.  Comstock. 
Captain  Owen  R.  Bird. 
Major  J.  W.  O'Mahoney. 

Division  Gas  Officer: 

Captain  A.  M.  Fisher. 

Major  B.  H.  Namm. 

Major  Frederick  L.  Chambers. 


The  General  Staf  43 

Commander  of  Trains: 

Colonel  William  M.  Morrow. 

Major  Oral  E.  Clark. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Harry  E.  Comstock. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  E.  J.  Ely. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Staley  A.  Campbell. 

Colonel  Samuel  G.  Jones. 

The  Second  Section.     G-2 

The  Second  Section  of  the  General  Staff,  known  as  G-2,  or  the 
Intelligence  Section,  is  charged  with  the  collection,  collation  and 
publication  of  all  military  information,  with  the  secm-ing,  publish- 
ing and  distribution  of  maps,  the  direction  of  the  personnel  engaged 
in  intelligence  work,  counter-espionage  and  censorship,  and  the  exam- 
ination of  prisoners  of  war  and  captured  documents. 

It  was  under  Lieutenant  Colonel  Herbert  Parsons,  who  suc- 
ceeded Major  William  H.  Clendenin  as  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff, 
G-2,  on  June  8th,  1918,  and  who  held  the  office  throughout  the  Fifth 
Division's  participation  in  the  activities  of  the  war,  that  the  Intelli- 
gence Section  developed  to  its  greatest  activity  and  efficiency.  The 
main  activities  of  the  dej^artment  were  its  observation,  scouting,  ex- 
amination of  ])risoners,  preparation  of  maps,  and  after  the  armistice 
the  establishment  of  a  c-ounter-espionage  system. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Roger  H.  Williams  became  G-2  on  Decem- 
ber 23rd,  1918.  Assistants  in  the  office  of  G-2  have  been  Captains 
Fred  A.  Carter  and  Frank  G.  Potts  and  First  Lieutenant  Chester 
Allen. 


The  Third  Section.     G-3 

The  Third  Section,  G-3,  is  the  Operations  and  Training  Section. 
Here  were  prepared  all  the  Field  and  Operations  Orders,  the  tactical 
plans  for  defense  and  attack,  reports  of  operations,  training  schemes, 
and  regulations  and  orders  for  the  employment  of  technical  troops. 
It  was  upon  the  careful  estimate  by  G-3  of  "our"  situation,  together 
with  the  G-2  estimate  of  the  "enemy"  situation  that  the  commander 
based  his  decisions.  This  department  is  responsible  for  tlie  organiza- 
tion and  maintenance  of  liaison  throughout  the  command  and  for  the 
training  of  the  personnel  of  the  units  of  the  Division.    G-3  keeps  the 


The  General  Staf  45 

war  diary  and  maintains  a  Message  Center.  This  Section  is  also 
charged  especially  with  the  observation  of  the  condition  of  discipline 
and  morale  of  the  command. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Kerwin  T.  Smith  was  Assistant  Chief  of 
Staff,  G-3,  imtil  June  8th,  1918,  Avhen  he  was  relieved  by  Major  John 
B.  Barnes,  who  headed  the  Operations  Section  through  the  Vosges 
fighting  and  the  St.  Mihiel  Operation.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Ralph 
W.  Kingman  became  G-3  on  September  19th,  1918,  and  held  the 
position  during  the  Meuse-Argonne  Operations  and  the  Fifth  Divi- 
sion's service  in  the  Army  of  Occupation.  The  Assistants  in  the  office 
of  G-3  were:  Major  Phillip  J.  McCook  and  Captains  Solomon  K. 
Brown,  Frederick  V.  Burgess  and  William  J.  Snyder. 

Secretary  to  the  General  Staff 

The  Secretary  to  the  General  Staff  receives  and  forwards  to  the 
proper  bm-eau  of  the  General  Staff  all  messages  and  documents  per- 
taining thereto  and  is  responsible  for  prompt  action  on  them.  He 
has  immediate  charge  of  interpreters  and  translators,  and  forwards 
routine  reports  to  higher  commands.  Captain  Thomas  A.  Knight 
was  Secretary  of  the  General  Staff  until  October  18th,  1918,  when 
he  was  succeeded  by  Captain  Willard  A.  Knapp.  Captain  Lawrence 
B.  Glasgow  was  detailed  to  this  office  on  April  1.5th,  1919. 

Aides-de-Camp 

The  personal  staff  of  the  Commanding  General  consists  of  his 
aides-de-camp.  Captain  Leslie  W.  Devereux  and  Second  Lieutenant 
Roy  F.  Ash  were  aides-de-camp  to  Major  General  John  E.  Mc- 
Mahon.  Captain  Arthur  P.  Watson  was  aide-de-camp  to  Major 
General  Hanson  E.  Ely. 


05 


to 


O 
I 


-« 


s 


a. 


PART  II 
HISTORY  OF  OPERATIONS 


Chapter  I 
ORGANIZATIOX  AND  TRAINING 


ED  DIAMOND  is  tlie  emblem  of  the  IMeuso 
Division.  It  is  the  diamond  that  cut  into  the 
l)attle  line  of  the  Vosges  in  August,  1918,  and  by 
the  capture  of  the  village  of  Frapelle  made  the 
only  indentation  suffered  by  the  Germans  in  their 
southern  sectors  in  three  years  of  trench  warfare. 
It  is  the  diamond  that  helped  shear  off  the  salient 
of  St.  Mihiel  in  the  first  great  all-American  oper- 
ation of  the  war  in  September.  It  is  the  diamond 
that,  after  slowly  grinding  the  Boche  from  out  Bois  des  Rappes, 
became  the  point  of  the  arrow  that  pierced  the  Meuse  and  thereby 
gave  to  the  Fifth  Division  its  name.  It  is  the  diamond  that  pene- 
trated the  territory  east  of  the  river  Meuse  to  a  depth  of  eighteen 
kilometers  before  its  drive  was  stopped  by  the  Armistice  on  Novem- 
ber 11th.  It  is  the  Red  Diamond  that  was  chosen  as  one  of  the  ten 
American  divisions  that  made  up  the  Army  of  Occupation  to  hold 
beaten  Germany  on  her  knees  while  peace  was  being  prepared.  The 
story  of  the  Red  Diamond  Division  is  as  interesting  as  that  of  any 
of  the  American  imits  which  helped  bring  glory  and  fame  to  the 
Allied  arms. 

The  Fifth  Division  was  organized  as  a  part  of  the  program  of 
the  War  Department  for  the  rapid  expansion  of  the  Regular  Army 
and  its  establishment  on  a  war  footing  for  immediate  service  in 
France.  Following  the  United  States'  declaration  of  war  against 
Germany  on  April  6th,  1917.  Congress  had  passed  "An  Act  to 
Authorize  the  President  to  Increase  Temj^orarily  the  Military  Estab- 
lishment of  the  United  States."  The  law  was  approved  May  18th. 
It  ordered  the  immediate  creation  of  the  five  years'  increment  to  the 
Regular  Army  provided  for  in  the  National  Defense  Act  of  June  3rd, 
1916.  In  accordance  therewith,  the  then  existing  units  of  the  army 
already  swollen  with  recruits  were  broken  up  and  new  regiments  of 


50  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

infantry,  artilleiy  and  engineers  were  formed.  Intensive  training 
schedules  anticipatory  to  action  on  the  Western  Front  of  Europe 
were  engaged  upon  to  get  the  green  troops  ready  for  war  in  the 
shortest  possible  time. 

Then  the  formation  of  divisions  was  begun.  America's  infantry 
division  was  to  be  composed  of  two  infantry  brigades  of  two  infantry 
regiments  and  one  machine  gun  battalion  each,  one  artillery  brigade 
of  one  heavy  and  two  light  regiments  and  one  trench  mortar  battery, 
an  engineer  regiment,  a  field  signal  battalion,  a  divisional  machine 
gun  battalion,  a  headquarters  troop,  a  train  headquarters  and  military 
police,  with  sanitary,  supply,  ammunition  and  engineer  trains  and 
auxiliary  units. 

First  steps  toward  the  organization  of  the  Fifth  Division  were 
taken  by  the  AVar  Department  in  November,  1917.  Camp  Logan, 
Houston.  Texas,  was  chosen  to  be  the  birthplace  of  the  new  com- 
mand. About  tlie  middle  of  the  month  instructions  were  issued  from 
Washington  to  the  Central,  Southeastern  and  Southern  Departments 
for  the  transfer  of  enlisted  men  from  the  cavalry  and  infantry  regi- 
ments therein  to  Camp  Logan  for  the  formation  of  the  Trains  of  the 
Fifth  Division.  November  24th  was  the  date  on  which  orders  were 
issued  by  the  department  headquarters.  Transfers  were  to  be  effec- 
tive as  of  December  first,  which  may,  therefore,  be  taken  as  the  date 
of  organization  of  the  Fifth  Division. 

The  regiments  designated  to  form  the  Fifth  Division  were  the 
Sixtieth,  Sixty-first,  Sixth  and  Eleventh  Infantry,  Nineteenth, 
Twentieth  and  Twenty-first  Field  Artillery  and  Seventh  Engineers. 
Brigading  of  the  regiments  was  eff^ected  about  December  1st,  numer- 
ical designation  of  the  units  following  the  tables  of  organization  pre- 
pared for  the  new  American  division. 

The  Sixtieth  and  Sixty-first  Infantry,  in  training  at  Camp 
Greene,  North  Carolina,  had  been  organized  at  Gettysburg,  Penn- 
sylvania, on  the  scene  of  that  historic  battle  of  the  Civil  War.  In 
June  detachments  from  the  old  Seventh  Infantry  had  formed  the 
nuclei  for  these  new  organizations.  After  having  been  raised  to 
the  strength  of  regiments  by  the  assignment  of  recruits,  they  were 
brigaded  into  the  Ninth  Infantry  Brigade.  Personnel  was  taken 
from  the  Sixtieth  and  Sixty-first  to  organize  the  brigade  head- 
quarters detachment  and  the  Fourteenth  IMachine  Gim  Battalion. 
Colonel  Armand  I.  Lasseigne  of  the  Sixty-first  held  the  command  of 
the  brigade  until  Brigadier  General  James  H.  McRae  arrived  on 
January  2nd,  1918. 


Organization  and  Training  51 

The  Sixth  and  Eleventh  Infantry  were  the  only  old  outfits 
included  in  the  Fifth  Division.  Their  history  dated  back  to  those  last 
years  of  the  eighteenth  century  when  our  country  increased  its  army 
because  of  the  probability  of  war  with  Napoleonic  France.  The 
Sixth  and  the  Eleventh  returned  from  service  on  the  IMexican  border 
and  were  stationed  at  Camp  Forrest,  Georgia.  They  were  brigaded 
into  the  Tenth  Infantry  Brigade  and  provided  men  for  the  formation 
of  the  headquarters  detachment  and  the  Fifteenth  Machine  Gun 
Battalion.    Brigadier  General  Walter  H.  Gordon  took  command. 

The  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  Avas  formed  from  the  Nine- 
teenth, Twentieth  and  Twenty-first  Field  Artillery,  in  training  at 
Camp  Stanley,  Leon  Springs,  Texas.  These  three  regiments  had 
been  organized  at  Camp  Wilson,  Texas,  on  June  1st — the  Nineteenth 
and  Twentieth,  light,  from  the  old  Seventh  Field  and  the  Twenty- 
first,  heavy,  from  the  Third  Field.  The  Brigade  was  commanded  by 
Colonel  Brook  Payne  of  the  Twentieth  until  December  31st,  when 
Brigadier  General  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler  came.  General  Flagler 
had  been  colonel  of  the  Seventh  Engineers.  Headquarters  detach- 
ment and  the  Fifth  Trench  Mortar  Battery  were  organized  Decem- 
ber 12th. 

To  conmiand  the  Fifth  Division  Major  General  Charles  H. 
Muir  was  relieved  from  duty  at  Camp  Jackson,  South  Carolina,  and 
ordered  to  proceed  to  Camp  Logan.  General  Muir  arrived  at  Logan 
about  the  middle  of  December,  but  was  in  command  only  one  day 
when  he  was  ordered  to  Camp  Hancock,  Georgia,  to  assmne  com- 
mand of  the  Twenty-eighth  Division  there. 

Colonel  William  M.  ISIorrow,  who  had  been  ordered  from  Presi- 
dio, California,  to  command  the  Fifth  Division  Train,  had  assumed 
command  of  the  new  division,  and  on  the  departure  of  General  Muir 
resumed  and  exercised  command  imtil  January  1st,  1918,.  Then 
arrived  Brigadier  General  John  E.  McMahon,  who  had  been  relieved 
from  duty  with  the  Ninety-second  Division  at  Camp  Dix,  New  Jer- 
sey, in  which  he  was  commanding  the  167th  Field  Artillery  Brigade. 
General  McMahon  was  made  a  Major  General  on  February  6th. 

Organization  of  a  Division  Headquarters  was  provided  by  War 
Department  order  on  December  12th,  which  directed  Major  David 
P.  Wood  to  proceed  to  Camp  Logan  for  duty  as  Adjutant  of  the 
Fifth  Division.  Major  Wood  arrived  December  17th.  Special 
Orders  Number  One  of  the  Fifth  Division  were  issued  December 
19th,  1917.  The  General  Staff  was  started  with  the  arrival  of  Lieu- 
tenant Colonel  Ralph  E.  Ingram  in  the  latter  part  of  December,  who 
became  Chief  of  Staff.     Lieutenant  Colonel  Kerwin  T.  Smith  and 


52  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

Majors  Joliii  Randolph  and  William  H.  Clendenin  reported  and 
took  up  the  duties  of  heads  of  the  General  Staff  sections,  Operations, 
Administration  and  Supply,  and  Intelligence,  respectively. 

Decemher  was  for  the  Division  solely  a  month  of  organization. 
The  regiments  newly  assigned  continued  their  courses  of  training 
already  in  operation.  There  was  little  to  make  them  realize  that  they 
now  belonged  to  a  Fifth  Division.  Administrative  control  of  the 
units  was  taken  over  bj^  the  division  and  brigade  headquarters,  suc- 
ceeding departmental  and  post  authority.  The  organizations  were  so 
widely  scattered  over  the  entire  eastern  half  of  the  United  States, 
however,  that  no  close  supervision  was  practicable.  Only  Train 
Headquarters  and  INIilitary  Police,  Fifth  Amnmnition  Train,  Fifth 
Sanitary  Train  and  Thirteenth  jSIachine  Gun  Battalion  were  at 
Camp  Logan  with  Division  Headquarters. 

Those  were  the  days  when  our  army  was  expanding  with  mush- 
room rapidity.  Thousands  of  men  were  being  made  into  soldiers 
every  day  and  new  organizations  were  coming  into  existence  weekly. 
Tables  of  organization  and  equipment  were  uncertain  and  liable  to 
change  at  any  time  to  meet  the  needs  as  discovered  across  the  seas. 
The  divisional  machine  gun  battalion  was  organized  as  a  four  com- 
pany horse  unit.  Word  came  that  it  should  be  a  two  company  motor 
l)attalion  and  that  brigade  machine  gun  battalions  should  be  com- 
posed of  four  companies  instead  of  three.  Accordingly  the  Thir- 
teenth Machine  Gun  Battalion  turned  in  ecjuipment  and  transferred 
bodily  its  Companies  C  and  D.  Company  C  liecame  D  of  the  Four- 
teenth and  D  became  D  of  the  Fifteenth.  But  the  companies  never 
saw  their  new  outfits  until  the  Division  moved  to  Camp  Merritt  for 
embarkation. 

Following  out  regulations  a  supply  train  had  been  organized 
at  Logan  by  Colonel  Morrow,  when  it  was  learned  that  the  Fifth 
Supply  Train  had  already  been  formed  at  Camp  Joseph  E.  John- 
stone, Florida.  The  Fifth  Aimnunition  Train  was  reorganized  on  a 
new  basis.  The  Fifth  Sanitary  Train  was  formed  from  Field  Hos- 
pital and  Ambulance  Companies  Seventeen  from  Fort  Benjamin 
Harrison,  Indiana,  Field  Hospital  and  Ambulance  Companies 
Twenty-five  from  Fort  Oglethorpe,  Georgia,  Field  Hospital  and 
Ambulance  Comj^anies  Twenty-nine  from  the  Gettysburg  National 
Park  and  Field  Hospital  and  Ambulance  Companies  Thirty  from 
Fort  Ontario,  New  York.  The  Ninth  Field  Battalion,  Signal  Corps, 
organized  at  Leon  Sj)rings  in  July,  was  assigned  to  the  Division  in 
December.  In  February  the  Fifth  Mobile  Ordnance  Repair  Shop 
joined  the  Division  from  Camp  Dodge,  Iowa,  and  in  March  the  Fifth 


Organization  and  Trcdning  53 

Mobile  Veterinar)^  Unit  was  established.  Everyone  was  kept  on  the 
alert,  maintaining  the  Division  at  standard  organization. 

The  great  incentive  for  work  and  the  cliief  desire  of  every  man 
in  the  Division  was  service  overseas.  Four  American  divisions  had 
crossed  even  before  the  organization  of  the  Fifth  and  were  already 
gaining  fame  in  the  World  War.  Every  organization  had  had  its 
rmnors  of  immediate  sailing.  The  very  first  bulletins  of  the  new 
Fifth  looked  forward  to  the  journey  to  France.  Experiences  of 
troops  already  in  the  line  and  recommendations  of  conmianders  and 
observers  were  published  at  headquarters  and  followed  out  by  the 
units.  Difficulties  were  numerous  and  sometimes  grave,  for  the 
training  camps  were  far  different  from  the  battlefields  of  France. 

The  winter  of  1917-18  was  exceptionally  severe  and  the  Smmy 
South  where  most  of  the  troops  of  the  Division  were  stationed  was 
not  exempt  from  the  chill  and  rain  and  snow.  Khaki  clothing  did 
not  keep  men  from  shivering  in  the  strenuous  outdoor  work  of  the 
intensive  training  period.  Equipment  was  generally  very  scarce  or 
unobtainable.  Machine  guns  were  a  minus  quantity.  Officers,  how- 
ever, found  a  way  to  instruct  their  men  by  rigging  up  rifles  on  saw- 
horses.  When  the  artillery  regiments  were  without  guns,  tent  pegs 
driven  in  the  ground  served  to  indicate  the  cannon  wheels  for  the  in- 
struction of  recruits  in  standing  gun  drill.  Concrete  hand  grenades 
and  dunmiy  men  stretched  on  frames  for  bayonetting  helped  bring 
realism  and  skill  to  the  doughboy  in  handling  his  weapons.  All  units 
spent  much  time  on  rifle  and  pistol  ranges.  Gas  drill,  with  the  new 
American  masks,  was  introduced.  Complete  trench  systems,  planned 
and  laid  out  by  engineers,  were  dug  and  occupied  as  in  real  warfare. 
Much  assistance  was  given  by  the  officers  and  noncoms  provided  by 
the  Allied  armies. 

Practically  every  unit  in  the  Division  was  brought  up  to  its  full 
strength  in  February  and  March  by  the  transfer  of  men  from  the 
National  Army  camps  and  recruiting  depots.  Orders  on  methods 
of  boxing  equipment  and  preparing  baggage  for  shipment  made  all 
beheve  that  the  day  of  departure  was  not  far  off.  Rigid  inspections 
were  held  to  see  that  the  Division  was  ready  for  overseas  service. 

The  Red  Diamond  was  selected  as  the  division  insignia  at  the 
suggestion  of  Major  Charles  A.  Meals  of  the  Quartermaster  Corps, 
who,  on  being  told  that  the  Division  should  have  a  distinctive  emblem, 
promptly  suggested  the  "Ace  of  Diamonds,  less  the  ace."  It  was 
approved  by  General  McMahon  and  officially  adopted  in  General 
Order  No.  2,  January  18th,  1918.  "The  division  insignia  will  be  a  red 
diamond  with  a  vertical  diagonal  of  six  inches  and  a  horizontal  diag- 


54  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

onal  of  four  inches  in  the  center  of  which  will  be  a  two-inch  figure 
'5'  in  white."  After  reaching  France  the  "5"  was  removed  from  the 
insignia.  All  miits  were  instructed  to  have  the  red  diamond  painted 
on  their  equii^ment  for  overseas  shipment. 


II 

Inasmuch  as  the  Fifth  Division  had  never  been  assembled,  its 
movement  overseas  was  piecemeal.  On  February  24th  advance  de- 
tachments from  the  infantry  and  artillery  brigades  left  their  camps 
to  precede  their  organizations  overseas — to  provide  billets  and  train- 
ing areas  and  to  attend  schools  in  French  methods  of  warfare.  The 
Advance  School  Detachments  of  the  artillery  brigade,  consisting  of 
about  fifty  officers  and  350  enlisted  men,  proceeded  after  arrival  in 
France  via  the  Leviathan,  the  converted  German  steamer  V aterland, 
to  Camp  la  Valdahon,  where  they  took  courses  with  French  7.5  and 
155  millimeter  guns.  Upon  completion  of  their  courses  the  officers 
and  men  acted  as  instructors  in  the  camp  school  until  their  own  bri- 
gade arrived.  Advance  School  Detaclmients  of  twenty-seven  officers 
and  about  fifty  noncoms  came  from  each  infantry  brigade,  and  went 
at  the  same  time  to  the  infantry  schools  at  Chatillon-sur- Seine. 

The  Seventh  Engineers  and  Seventh  Engineer  Train  were  the 
first  units  to  receive  orders  to  proceed  to  France.  The  Seventh 
Engineers  had  been  organized  in  May,  1917,  from  Comjjanies  E  and 
F  of  the  First  Engineers  and  were  undergoing  intensive  engineer 
training  at  Ft.  Leavenworth,  Kansas.  The  train  had  been  formed 
from  tlie  regiment  in  September.  Orders  for  foreign  service  were 
received  February  23rd.  The  route  to  France  was  via  Camp  Mer- 
ritt,  Hol)oken,  Liverpool,  Southampton  and  Le  Havre.  The  second 
battalion  sailed  March  5th,  arrived  in  France  March  23rd  and  pro- 
ceeded to  Gievres,  where  it  engaged  in  engineer  depot  construction  and 
operation,  with  considerable  railroad  work.  The  regimental  head- 
quarters, first  battalion  and  train  sailed  March  15th,  reached  France 
April  6th  and  was  emjiloyed  in  the  construction  of  hospitals,  bar- 
racks, warehouses  and  other  structures  in  the  divisional  training 
areas  of  the  Department  of  Haute  Marne. 

About  April  1st  came  the  overseas  orders  for  the  major  part 
of  the  Division.  General  McMahon  and  the  Division  Surgeon  and 
Quartermaster,  with  detachments  of  enlisted  men.  had  gone  to  Camp 
Merritt.  New  Jersey,  on  March  2(3th,  to  arrange  for  the  mobiliza- 
tion of  the  Division  at  the  embarkation  camp.  Genei'al  McMahon 
and  Lieutenant  Colonel  Ingram,  Chief  of  Staff',  preceded  the  Divi- 


Organization  and  Training  55 

sion  to  France,  arriving  April  15th.  On  April  2nd  Division  Head- 
quarters moved  from  Camp  Logan  to  Camp  JMerritt.  There  were 
assembled  the  Ninth  and  Tenth  Infantry  Brigades,  the  Ninth  Field 
Sig-nal  Battalion,  the  Thirteenth  ]Machine  Gun  Battalion,  Head- 
quarters  Troop,  and  Train  Headquarters  and  ]Military  Police.  Sail- 
ings began  April  9th  when  the  Sixth  Infantry  left  for  Brest.  The 
last  of  the  assemblage  had  gone  by  Ajjril  30th.  The  Artillery  Bri- 
gade and  Ammunition  Train  did  not  sail  till  the  end  of  May,  while 
the  Supply  and  Sanitary  Trains  brought  up  the  rear  by  leaving  the 
States  in  June. 

The  journey  overseas  was  accomplished  as  a  rule  without  in- 
cident. Most  all  the  troops  sailed  in  convoys,  guarded  by  cruisers 
or  destrovers.  A  few  units  traveled  on  boats  that  struck  out  across 
the  dangerous  waters  alone  and  unprotected.  The  Huron,  on  which 
the  Ninth  Field  Signal  Battalion  sailed,  was  rammed  by  another 
ship  of  the  convoy  when  two  days  out  at  sea  and  had  to  put  back  to 
New  York  for  repairs.  Submarines  were  sighted  by  the  convoy  in 
which  Division  Headquarters  sailed,  and  there  were  exciting  moments 
while  the  destroyers  darted  here  and  there  droj^ping  depth  bombs. 
The  U-boats  were  driven  away  without  attacking  the  convoy.  A 
similar  incident  occurred  with  the  Artillery  Brigade's  convoy  as  it 
neared  the  English  coast  in  June. 

The  larger  part  of  the  Division  landed  at  Liverpool.  England 
was  wild  over  American  troops  and  hailed  them  unreservedly  as  the 
coming  saviors  of  the  Allied  cause.  For  the  first  time  most  of  the 
men  saw  the  English  as  a  cordial,  friendly  people  rather  than  as  the 
hereditary  Tory  enemy  of  Revolutionary  days.  By  train  the  troops 
crossed  the  beautiful  green-clad  hills  and  dales  of  England  to  South- 
ampton, with  a  few  days'  stop  at  the  Winchester  rest  camps.  Despite 
the  cheer  of  the  English  the  American  could  feel  the  terrible  pinch 
of  war,  for  food  was  dear  and  very  scarce.  The  rough  Channel  cross- 
ing was  made  to  Le  Havre.  Other  units  came  direct  from  New 
York  to  the  landing  at  Brest,  St.  Nazaire  or  Bordeaux. 

The  atmosphere  of  France  was  a  shock  after  the  cheer  of  Eng- 
land. The  famine  of  food  was  not  apparent,  but  the  awful  effects 
of  foui'  years  of  war  close  at  hand  had  laid  its  pall  on  the  people. 
Everyone  wore  the  finieral-air.  Scarce  a  family  but  had  been  touched 
by  death  of  a  son  or  brother  or  father  in  battle.  Those  days  of 
April  and  May  were  grave  and  menacing  to  the  French,  for  the 
Germans  had  lamiched  their  last  great  offensive  that  was  to  win  or 
lose  the  war. 


Orgamzation  and  Training  57 

Division  Headquarters  were  established  at  Le  Havre  on  May 
1st,  1918.  Thus  the  Fifth  was  tlie  eighth  combat  division  to  arrive 
in  France,  preceded  only  by  the  First,  Twenty-sixth,  Second,  Forty- 
second,  Thirty-second,  Third  and  Seventy-seventh.  The  Red  Dia- 
mond men  were  among  the  first  "JOO.OOO  combat  troops. 

Bar-sur-Aube  in  the  Department  of  Aube  had  been  selected  as 
the  training;'  center  for  the  Division.  A  few  davs  at  the  so-called 
"rest"  camps  of  debarkation  ports  gave  the  men  opportunity  to  recu- 
perate from  their  sea  voyage.  Then  came  introduction  to  the  French 
railways  with  the  box-car  accommodations  that  have  become  familiar 
and  famous  to  every  American  soldier  as  the  "Chevaux  8."  The 
alleged  capacity  sign  of  "40  Homines"  made  many  a  soldier  sigh  for 
even  the  luxurious  roominess  of  the  old  American  "side-door  Pull- 
man." 

The  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  IJattalion  arrived  at  Bar-sur- 
Aube  on  April  iGth  and  proceeded  to  the  machine  gun  area  south  of 
the  city.  The  Sixth  Infantry  arrived  on  the  "iSth  and  went  to  Sou- 
laines,  north  of  Bar-sin-- Aube,  the  area  of  the  Tenth  Brigade.  The 
Sixty-first  Infantry  Avas  next  to  arrive  on  May  'ind,  which  with  the 
Ninth  Infantry  Brigade  Headquarters  was  at  Bligny.  Division 
Headquarters  were  set  up  in  Bar-sur-Aube  on  May  4th.  The  Thir- 
teenth Machine  Gim  Battalion  and  Sixtieth  Infantry  arrived  the 
same  day.  The  mobilization  was  completed  by  the  arrival  of  the 
Eleventh  Infantry  and  Tenth  Brigade  Headquarters  on  the  8th  and 
the  Fifteenth  INIachine  Gun  Battalion  on  the  9th.  Train  Headquar- 
ters did  not  arrive  till  the  17th  and  the  Signal  Battalion  on  the  2'2nd. 

As  each  unit  arrived  it  began  immediately  its  intensive  training 
for  the  front.  France  was  entirely  new  to  the  men  of  the  Red  Dia- 
mond, vastly  different  from  the  homeland.  There  was  a  constant 
reminder  of  the  pri\'ations  tliat  the  people  were  undergoing  in  the 
high  prices  of  everj^  commodity  and  the  extreme  economies  of  the 
natives.  The  sale  of  butter,  milk  and  eggs  was  forbidden  to  the 
American  troops  in  order  not  to  diminish  the  small  supply  available 
for  children  and  the  sick  and  wounded.  Xothing  might  be  purchased 
in  French  markets  except  for  messes.  The  men  in  olive-drab  learned 
to  respect  the  ])()wer  of  the  almighty  t'lchet-dc-pain.  Conservation 
was  the  constant  watchword  and  the  longer  the  Americans  remained 
the  more  they  felt  the  difference  fi-om  the  easy-going  liberality  of  the 
States.  Even  in  military  matters,  the  French  instructors  taught  the 
methods  of  fire  which  woidd  sa\'e  the  largest  amount  of  anmiunition 
and  methods  of  construction  that  would  mean  the  greatest  economy 
of  material. 


58  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

The  troops  worked  entluisiastically  and  learned  rapidly.  Pos- 
sibly the  new  and  delightful  proxhnity  of  Freneh  cafes  helped  out. 
Al)out  a  hundred  new  officers  were  assigned  to  the  Division  on  its 
arrival  in  the  area  and  assisted  in  instilling  the  newest  methods  of 
war.  The  divisional  area  was  a  good  hundred  kilometers  from  the 
front,  yet  there  was  ever  danger  from  enemy  airj^lanes.  No  lights 
were  displayed  at  night  and  care  was  taken  to  curtain  all  doors  and 
Avindows.  It  is  said  that  men  even  looked  to  see  that  tell-tale  streaks 
of  light  did  not  escape  through  cracks  in  the  roofs  of  the  barns  they 
occupied  m  joint  company  with  cows,  pigs  and  chickens.  Gas  train- 
ing became  more  realistic  where  there  was  lots  of  available  material 
for  making  practice  cloud  and  projector  attacks.  Divisional  schools 
in  machine  gim,  signaling  and  intelligence  were  established.  Inas- 
much as  the  Supply  Train  had  not  yet  sailed  for  France  it  was  nec- 
essary to  organize  a  provisional  train  to  man  the  trucks  that  were 
issued  to  the  Division  for  the  service  of  supply. 

On  May  18th,  with  the  Tenth  Brigade  assembled  in  an  open 
field  near  Soulaines,  the  Sixth  and  Eleventh  Infantry  Regiments 
were  presented  with  a  beautiful  stand  of  national  and  regimental 
colors,  the  gift  of  the  granddaughter  of  the  great  Marechal  ]\Iac- 
Mahon.  The  presentation  speech  was  made  by  the  JNIarcjuis  de 
Dompierre,  a  direct  descendant  of  the  Due  de  Rochambeau,  who 
fought  for  America  in  the  War  of  the  Revolution.  A  silver  plate 
attached  to  the  standard  bore  the  inscription: 

"From  the  sons  of  the  French  champions  for  American  liberty 
to  the  American  champions  for  France  and  Humanity." 


Chapter  II 
TRENCH  WAKl  ARE— FKAPELLE 


FTER  an  inspection  of  the  units  of  the  Division 
ill  the  latter  part  of  May  by  General  Pershing, 
the  Coiiiinaiuler-in-Chief  of  the  Anieriean  Ex- 
peditionary Forces,  the  Fifth  was  declared  ready 
for  introduction  to  the  front.  It  was  placed  at 
the  disi)osal  of  the  French  for  combatant  service. 
The  Division  passed  from  the  administrative 
control  of  the  American  Third  Army  Corps  to 
the  First  Corps.  On  May  31st  Field' Order  No. 
1  was  issued  ])re])aratory  to  the  move  toward  the  front. 

The  Sixth  Infantry,  which  had  profited  hy  its  early  arrival  in 
France  and  week's  extra  training,  and  the  Thirteenth  Machine  Gun 
Battalion  were  detached  from  the  Division  and  sent  direct  on  June 
1st  to  I'agiiy-sur-Meuse.  There  they  went  into  reserve  behind  the 
Twenty-sixth  Division,  then  in  line  in  the  Toul  sector.  Reconnais- 
sance parties  visited  the  front  line,  but  the  Red  Diamond  organiza- 
tion saw  no  action,  and  on  June  1  t-1.5th  they  entrained  to  rejoin  the 
Division. 

The  Fifth  Division  was  jjlaced  under  the  orders  of  the  Thirty- 
third  Corps  of  the  French  Seventh  Army,  which  was  holding  the  ex- 
treme southern  portion  of  the  front  in  Upper  Alsace  and  the  Vosges 
Mountains.  No  American  troops  had  as  yet  entered  these  sectors. 
It  was  planned  to  give  the  Division  further  instruction,  especially  in 
the  weapons  and  methods  of  the  trenches,  and  gradually  introduce 
them  into  the  front  line  as  their  skill  increased. 

On  the  same  day  that  the  Sixth  Infantry  and  Thirteenth  Ma- 
chine Gun  Battalion  departed  northward  the  remainder  of  the  Divi- 
sion entrained  for  the  Vosges.  Division  Headquarters  were  estab- 
lished at  Corcieux.  but  on  the  7th  were  moved  to  Gerardmer,  to  be 
with  the  headquarters  of  the  Thirty-third  Corps.  Here  the  divisional 
staff  had  opportunity  to  study  the  actual  working  of  the  French 


60  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

lieadquarters.  Tlie  Division  itself,  with  the  Ninth  Brigade,  was 
attached  for  its  training  to  tlie  French  Seventieth  Division.  The 
Sixtieth  Infantry  was  billeted  in  Bruyeres  and  the  Sixty-first  at  Ger- 
ardmer.  After  a  few  days  the  Sixty-second  Division  (French)  took 
over  tlie  instruction  of  the  Sixtieth  Infantry.  The  Tenth  Brigade, 
minus  Sixtli  Infantry,  was  attached  to  the  Seventy-seventh  Division 
(Frencli)  and  proceeded  to  Moosch.  in  the  AVasserling  area,  the 
sector  joining  the  Gerardnier  or  Anould  sector  on  the  south. 

With  tlie  exception  of  the  Wasserling.  tlie  Anould  sector  was 
tlic  most  rugged  of  the  entire  fi'ont.  Stretcliing  southward  from  a 
point  in  the  valley  of  the  Fave  River  east  of  St.  Die  to  near  Munster, 
Alsace,  in  the  Fecht  valley,  over  an  extent  of  thirty  kilometers,  the 
lines  included  some  of  the  highest  peaks  of  the  A^osges.  As  a  rule 
the  French  trenches  followed  the  crests  of  the  ridges,  passing  over 
the  peaks  of  Tete  de  Violu  and  Tete  de  Faux.  On  Violu,  the  front 
crossed  from  France  into  Alsace.  From  the  toj)  of  Dansant  de  Fete 
and  from  high  points  in  the  St.  Die  sector  to  the  north,  the  enemy 
had  observation  down  the  valley  of  the  ISIeurthe,  the  valley  of  the 
Fave  and  the  valley  leading  down  from  the  pass  of  Col  de  Ste.  ]Marie. 
As  a  rule,  however,  the  French  on  the  peaks  and  crests  held  the  higher 
ground  and  from  some  ]wints  could  even  see  the  plains  of  Alsace  and 
the  Rhine.  In  the  southern  end  of  the  sector  where  the  line  descended 
east  of  the  watershed  the  enemy  held  the  higher  ground. 

The  extremely  mountainous  character  of  this  country,  with  its 
deep  ravines,  steej}  slopes  and  tliickly  wooded  ridges,  made  active 
warfare  practically  impossible.  There  had  been  no  change  in  the 
line  in  over  three  and  a  half  years.  The  nxiuntain  ridges  were  cut 
by  only  three  passes — Col  de  Ste.  ]Marie  on  the  north.  Col  de  Bf)n- 
homme  near  the  middle  and  Col  de  Schlucht  on  the  south — through 
which  led  the  only  wagon  roads  to  the  front  lines.  Winding  trails 
took  troops  to  trenches,  strong  jjoints  and  observation  ])osts. 

The  only  activities  of  the  sector  were  patrolling  and  raiding  by 
the  infantry  and  occasional  harassing  tire  by  the  artillery.  Each  side 
knew  the  location  of  all  roads  and  trenches  very  accurately;  and  in 
case  of  attempted  activity  on  the  jjart  of  either  side,  roads  and  passes 
were  jiromptly  subjected  to  heavy  shelling  so  as  to  cut  off  reinforce- 
ments and  sui^plies.  Trench  warfare  was  here,  therefore,  practiced 
in  its  most  settled  development.  Trenches  were  permanent,  rein- 
forced with  concrete,  with  deep  and  strong  suliterranean  dugouts  for 
shelter  of  the  occupying  troops.  Communication  trenches,  leading  to 
the  French  lines  on  the  eastern  slopes  of  the  mountains,  were  often 
under  the  observation  of  the  enemy  and  had  to  be  very  deep;  in  some 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  61 

cases  they  became  regular  tunnels.  Positions  had  been  stationary 
for  so  long  that  the  camouflage  was  that  of  nature;  observation  posts, 
battery  positions  and  machine  gun  nests  were  overgrown  and  hidden 
by  moss,  vines  and  bushes. 

It  was  specialized  trench  warfare  that  the  troops  of  the  Fifth 
Division  were  instructed  in  when  they  moved  to  the  rear  section  of 
the  Anould  area.  For  the  fii-st  time  the  men  worked  with  live  hand 
and  rifle  grenades.  They  were  trained  in  the  use  of  pyrotechnics  and 
learned  just  what  rockets  to  use  to  call  for  an  artillery  barrage.  They 
were  taught  the  principles  of  observation  and  camouflage  and  trench 
construction.  They  learned  the  theory  of  raiding,  of  patrolling  and 
of  counterattacking.  Protection  against  and  the  use  of  gas,  espe- 
cially mustard,  was  emphasized. 

The  enthusiasm  of  the  men  of  Red  Diamond  made  an  excellent 
impression  on  the  French  commanders.  In  his  instructions  to  the 
French  tutors,  General  LeConte  of  the  Thirty-third  Corps  said, 
"The  Americans  are  filled  with  extreme  good  Avill  and  seem  impatient 
to  get  into  contact  with  the  Germans.  It  is  fitting  to  utilize  and  to 
keep  up  this  good  will  and  ardor,  but  it  is  necessary  to  enlighten  our 
new  allies  about  the  worth  of  the  adversary  that  they  are  going  to 
fight  and  to  make  them  understand  that  their  own  interests,  as  well 
as  the  interests  of  all,  demand  that  they  accjuire  suflicient  instruction 
to  face,  without  serious  risk,  our  common  enemy." 

The  instructors  were  officers  and  men  from  the  French  troops  in 
the  area.  The  permanent  sector  troops  were  French  Territorials,  of 
rather  low  morale  and  indiff'erent  ability,  well  content  to  keep  the 
sector  quiet  and  inactive.  They  were  supplemented  by  troops  sent 
to  the  quiet  sectors  for  rest  after  severe  fighting  on  other  parts  of 
the  front.  The  Americans  still  clung  to  the  idea  that  the  rifle  was 
the  main  dependence  in  warfare,  and  pushed  training  with  that  arm 
to  the  utmost,  in  addition  to  French  specialties.  Details  of  officers 
and  noncommissioned  officers  were  sent  to  the  front  lines  of  the  St. 
Die,  Anould  and  Wasserling  sectors,  where  they  gained  valuable 
advance  training  in  real  opposition  to  the  enemy. 

A  new  General  Staif  was  provided  for  the  Fifth  Division  on 
June  8th.  Colonel  Howard  R.  Hickok  relieved  Colonel  Ingram  as 
Chief  of  Staff;  INIajor  Martin  C.  Shallenberger  relieved  Major  Ran- 
dolph as  G-1;  Major  Herbert  Parsons  relieved  Major  Clendenin  as 
G-2,  and  Major  John  B.  Barnes  relieved  Lieutenant  Colonel  Smith 
as  G-3.  The  old  staff  officers  reported  to  Langres  for  a  course  in  the 
Army  General  Staff'  College.  Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner 
had  taken  command  of  the  Ninth  Brigade  on  May  10th. 


■2 
"a 

2q 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  63 

II 

By  June  11th  training  had  progressed  so  far  that  the  Division 
was  placed  at  the  disposal  of  the  General  Commanding  the  Twenty- 
first  Division  (French)  for  the  relief  of  the  Seventieth  Division. 
Reconnaissances  were  carried  out,  the  American  officers  accompany- 
ing their  French  tutoi-s.  On  June  12th  the  units  started  for  the  lines 
and  on  the  night  of  the  14t]i  the  first  reliefs  were  carried  out.  The 
Sixtieth  Infantrj%  with  headquarters  at  Ban-de-Laveline,  on  the 
north,  was  joined  to  the  Sixty-fourth  French  Territorials;  the  Sixty- 
first  Infantry,  with  headciuarters  at  La  Croix-aux-Mines,  was  as- 
signed to  the  Ninety-third  French  Infantry;  and  the  Eleventh  In- 
fantry, at  Plainfaing,  was  joined  to  the  137th  Territorials.  Com- 
mands were  exercised  by  the  French  officers,  with  American  officers 
beside  them.  Combat  groups  were  held  by  amalgamated  units,  half 
French,  half  American. 

The  first  casualties  of  the  Division  occurred  on  the  night  that  the 
first  elements  entered  the  trenches.  As  Company  I  of  the  Eleventh 
Infantry  was  moving  forward  to  the  trenches,  enemy  shell-fire  killed 
Private  Joseph  Kanieski  and  seriously  wounded  Captain  M.  W. 
Clark.  The  reliefs  were  all  carried  out  with  little  or  no  disturbance. 
At  this  time  the  enemy's  patrols  were  very  active  and  controlled  No 
Man's  Land.  Presence  of  the  Americans  was  immediately  discov- 
ered and  the  Cxcrmans  began  attempts  to  weaken  the  morale  of  their 
new  opponents  and  to  take  advantage  of  their  inexperience. 

At  2  A.  M.  on  June  17th  a  heavy  bombardment,  with  a  nuistard 
and  phosgene  gas  attack,  was  launched  against  the  Second  Battalion 
of  the  Sixtieth  Infantry,  just  aifter  it  had  entered  the  trenches  near 
Ban-de-Laveline.  The  shelling  broke  open  a  dugout  where  men  of 
Company  G  were  sleeping,  killing  three,  wounding  three  and  gassing 
twenty-four  men.  The  French,  however,  suff'ered  more  heavily  than 
the  Americans.  An  attack  on  two  of  the  combat  gi'oups  immediately 
following  the  gas  was  quickly  repulsed  by  vigorous  machine  gun  and 
rifle  fire. 

The  combined  forces  of  the  Sixty-first  Infantry  and  the  Ninety- 
third  French  Infantry  undertook  a  raid  on  the  German  lines  near 
Violu  and  la  Cude.  The  attack  was  supported  by  artillery  fire,  but 
proved  unsuccessful.  The  enemy  had  withdrawn  his  front-line 
troops  beyond  the  objective  of  the  raid.  A  counterattack  by  the 
(xcrmans  was  beaten  off^  handily,  with  losses  to  the  enemy.  Accord- 
ing to  the  story  of  an  Alsatian  deserter  taken  later,  all  the  partici- 
pants in  the  German  attack  were  awarded  the  Iron  Cross  of  the 
second  class  for  resisting  the  ferocity  of  the  American  reception. 


64  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

The  Sixth  Infantry  had  rejoined  tlie  Division  from  Pagny-sur- 
Meuse  and  entered  the  hnes  near  Lac  Xoir  and  I^ac  Blanc  on  June 
23rd.  Company  C's  First  Sergeant,  Charles  W.  Terhune,  was  taken 
prisoner  by  a  German  jiatrol  one  black  night.  The  enemy  again 
tried  raids  against  combat  groups  of  the  Sixtieth  and  the  Eleventh 
Infantry  on  June  26th.  The  Germans  were  equipped  with  licpiid 
fire,  high-explosive,  grenades  and  other  apparatus;  but  they  failed. 
In  their  retreat  they  left  most  of  their  weapons  behind.  Oiu*  men 
suffered  no  casualties  and  I^ieutenant  Charles  H.  Kypper,  the  com- 
mander of  one  of  the  groups  of  the  Sixtieth,  received  high  commenda- 
tion from  the  French  for  the  skill  with  which  he  had  handled  his  de- 
fense. Next  night  the  Germans  again  attempted  a  raid  against  the 
Sixty-first,  with  artillery  sup])ort.  The  French  who  occupied  that 
vicinity  with  us  withdrew,  but  a  corporal  and  twelve  men  of  Company 
Ij  remained  and  successfully  repulsed  the  raid.  The  enemy  party  of 
over  fifty  men  was  forced  to  retire,  leaving  behind  their  dead  leader. 
The  German  artillery  fire  had  killed  four  and  wounded  two  of  our 
men. 

One  black  night  a  lone  sentinel  in  an  outpost  trench  heard  sounds 
in  front  that  he  knew  to  be  made  hy  Germans.  Hastily  seizing  a 
hand  grenade  he  threw  it  u])  over  the  top  of  the  trench  at  the  foe. 
But  he  had  forgotten  the  band  of  wire  netting  along  the  rampart  of 
the  trench  that  the  French  had  ])ut  up  to  prevent  the  Boche  from 
hm-ling  missiles  down  on  the  occupants.  The  grenade  struck  the  wire 
and  flounced  back  in  rear  of  the  trench.  The  man  was  sin"e  now  that 
he  was  being  attacked,  for  he  heard  the  explosion  behind  him.  He 
grabbed  half  a  dozen  grenades  and  let  them  fly.  They  exploded  be- 
hind, and  even  in  the  trench  beside  him.  Panic-stricken  he  auto- 
matically hurled  grenade  after  grenade,  thinking  he  was  in  the  midst 
of  a  fierce  assault.  Doubtless  he  would  have  exhausted  the  entire 
stock  of  munitions  had  not  one  of  the  bombs  struck  him  and  wounded 
him  to  imconsciousness. 

Gradually  om*  troops  took  over  more  and  more  of  the  line. 
French  and  American  units  were  separated  as  the  latter  became 
acquainted  with  the  trenches,  and  the  American  officers  assumed 
command  of  their  own  organizations.  On  July  3rd  and  4th  the 
Ninth  Infantry  Brigade  turned  its  portion  of  the  sector,  Groupement 
Nord,  over  to  the  French  again  and  marched  back  to  the  Arches  area 
south  of  Epinal  for  further  training. 

Tlie  Sixth  and  Eleventh  Infantry  remained  in  the  southern  half 
of  the  sector  and  about  July  1st  were  entrusted  with  the  command. 
Colonel  Winans  was  in  command  of  Subsector  Des  Lacs  with  his 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  65 

regiment,  the  Sixth  Infantry.  Colonel  Bennet,  with  one  battalion  of 
his  regiment,  the  Eleventh  Infantry,  and  two  l)attalions  of  French 
troops  attached,  commanded  Snbsector  (xaschney.  Ivieutenant  Col- 
onel R.  J.  Einford.  with  one  l)atta]ion  of  the  Eleventh  Infantry  and 
one  battalion  of  French  infantry  attached,  commanded  Subsector 
Bichstein.  Brigadier  General  Gordon  was  in  supreme  command  of 
tlie  three  subsectors,  constituting  togetlier  CTroupement  Slid  of  the 
Anould  Sector.  This  command  was  retained  until  July  1.5th,  when 
the  brigade  was  relieved  to  go  to  the  St.  Die  Sector. 

The  Seventh  Engineers  joined  the  Division  on  June  3()th  and 
began  training  at  Le  Tholy.  On  July  8th  the  second  battalion  and 
Comjjany  C  jjroceeded  to  Subsector  Des  Lacs,  Alsace,  to  work  on 
front-line  shelters,  dugouts,  l)arracks  and  roads.  As  the  Fifth  Divi- 
sion had  been  the  first  American  troops  to  operate  in  German  terri- 
tory, so  were  the  Seventh  Engineers  the  first  American  engineers  to 
enter  Germany. 

This  several  weeks'  occupation  of  the  trenches,  with  constant 
patrolling  of  Xo  Man's  Land  and  frequent  sharp  encounters  with  the 
enemy,  had  benefited  the  Division.  The  men  bad  developed  esprit- 
de-corps  and  their  morale  was  high.  The  troops  were  ready  for  the 
next  step  in  their  training,  the  taking  over  of  a  divisional  sector.  Be- 
fore the  Xintli  Brigade  departed  from  the  Anould  area,  General 
Dauvin  of  the  Twenty-first  Division  had  addressed  a  letter  to  Gen- 
eral McMahon  as  follows: 

"Xow  that  the  Xinth  American  Brigade  is  al)out  to  be  relieved 
to  commence  instruction,  it  affords  me  pleasure  to  advise  you  that 
this  brigade  has  made  a  very  good  impression  by  its  attitude,  its 
dash,  its  warlike  spirit  and  the  excellent  relation  of  comradeship 
which  it  has  maintained  with  the  French  troops.  I  woidd  aj^preciate 
it  if  you  Avould  extend  my  compliments  to  the  Commanding  (xenei-al, 
Xinth  Brigade,  and  to  his  unit  commanders." 

Ill 

On  July  ]5th  the  Fiftli  Division  moved  to  tlie  St.  Die  Sector. 
The  Xinth  Brigade  proceeded  from  its  training  area  in  the  Arches 
district  and  the  Tenth  Brigade  came  direct  from  its  positions  in  the 
Anould  Sector.  Relief  of  tlie  French  troops  was  completed  on  July 
ItJth  and  at  10  a.  ar.  of  July  19th  command  of  the  sector  passed  from 
General  Gerard  of  the  Sixty-second  Fi-ench  Division  to  General 
Mc^Iahon  of  the  Fifth.  Division  Headquarters  Avere  at  St.  Die  and 
the  Red  Diamond  was  on  its  own  resources  and  resj^onsibilities  in 
defending  the  lines. 


^ 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  67 

The  St.  Die  Sector  lay  to  the  west  of  the  high  mountains,  and 
accordingly  was  not  so  hilly  as  the  Anould  Sector.  It  covered  an 
extent  of  al)out  twenty-five  kilometer  front,  reaching  from  the  hills 
on  the  north  of  the  Plaine  River  valley  to  the  valley  of  the  Fave  on 
the  soutli.  In  addition  to  the  Plaine  and  the  Fave,  the  sector  was 
pierced  near  the  center  hy  the  Kahodeau.  These  three  rivers  flowed 
westward  to  the  JNIeurthe.  The  sector  was  more  imj)ortant  than  the 
Anould.  for  its  valleys  offered  a  possible  means  of  approach  for  an 
enemy  army.  The  Germans  had  come  through  the  Fave  valley  in 
1914  and  occu])ied  St.  Die  for  seventeen  daj'S,  even  penetrating 
about  twenty  kilometers  west  of  the  town.  After  considerable  hard 
fighting  in  the  early  part  of  the  war,  however,  the  sector  had  settled 
down  to  a  quiet  front.  The  activities  were  about  the  same  as  in  the 
Anould. 

There  was  good  observation  of  the  enemy  lines  except  where 
they  lay  in  woods.  From  the  posts  on  high  Mont  d'Ormont,  which 
separated  St.  Die  from  the  lines,  oiu'  observers  looked  down  on  the 
enemy's  trenches  in  tlie  Fave  valley  and  northward  tlirough  the  Ban- 
de-Sapt  to  the  valley  of  the  Kabodeau,  a  distance  of  fifteen  kilo- 
meters. From  the  lieights  north  of  the  Rabodeau  there  was  observa- 
tion southward  to  Ormont  and  northward  to  the  Plaine  valley.  On 
the  other  hand,  from  the  conical  peak  of  Ortomont  the  enemy  had 
full  view  of  the  lines  in  Ban-de-Sapt  and  could  see  the  back  areas  in 
the  Meurthe  valley.  The  French  liad  many  times  attempted  to  take 
this  Gibraltar,  but  in  vain.  Their  last  attempt  had  cost  thousands  of 
lives.  From  the  higher  crests  in  his  rear  lines  the  Hun  had  o])serva- 
tion  of  the  streets  of  St.  Die  itself;  the  bridge  across  the  Meurthe  in 
the  main  street  had  been  camouflaged  to  protect  its  traffic  from  Ger- 
man eyes.  From  his  posts  in  the  upper  Plaine  vallej^  the  enemy 
looked  down  on  the  occupied  manufacturing  town  of  Celles  and 
could  even  see  our  trains  in  Raon  I'Etape  and  the  distant  city  of 
Luneville. 

The  Ninth  Brigade  on  July  14.th  took  over  the  northern  half  of 
the  sector,  relieving  the  279th  French  Regiment  and  also  assuming 
command  of  the  137th  French  Regiment  which  was  holding  the 
northern  side  of  the  Plaine  \alley,  the  dividing  line  between  the 
French  Seventh  and  Eighth  Armies  and  next  to  the  Baccarat  Sector. 
The  Sixtieth  Infantry  went  into  the  subsector  ravines,  including  the 
lines  through  the  heavily  wooded,  rough  area  between  the  Plaine  and 
the  Rabodeau.  The  Sixty-first  around  Moyenmoutier  went  into  the 
subsector  on  either  side  of  the  Rabodeau.  The  Tenth  Brigade  held 
the  southern  half  of  the  sector.     On  the  left,  south  of  the  Sixty-first, 


68  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

the  Eleventli  Infantry  went  into  the  lian-de-Sapt  suhsector.  The 
Sixth  Infantry  took  over  the  lines  in  Bois  d'Ormont.  The  Twenty- 
fifth  Fi'eneh  'I'erritorials  hehl  tlie  Fave  valley  at  first,  hnt  it  was  taken 
over  hy  the  Sixth  Infantry  in  August. 

As  in  the  Anould  Sector,  when  our  troops  first  entered  the  lines, 
the  Germans  controlled  No  Man's  Land.  At  all  points  they  exer- 
cised supremacy  of  the  air.  Boche  airplanes  were  constantly  over 
our  lines  searching  out  posts  of  command  and  hidden  strong  points, 
firing  on  oin*  troops  with  machine  guns  and  directing  the  adjustment 
of  their  own  artillery.  Sausage  halloons  in  their  hack  areas  rendered 
visihle  practically  all  American  daylight  activities. 

From  the  outset  the  troops  disjilayed  their  courage  and  vigor 
in  carrying  the  war  to  the  Boche.  They  seized  the  initiative  and 
shortly  after  going  into  the  sector  controlled  No  Man's  Land. 
Patrols  were  active  hoth  night  and  day.  Kngineers  accompanied  the 
excursions  and  hlew  up  wire  and  strongpoints  with  special  torpetloes. 
The  scout  platoons  organized  in  the  Anould  Sector  hecame  the  main 
dependence  of  the  Intelligence  Section  for  knowledge  of  the  enemy. 
The  map  of  the  sector  was  practically  remade  due  to  the  efforts  of 
the  scouts.  One  remarkahly  hold  and  nervy  patrol,  consisting  of  five 
enlisted  men  of  the  Sixty-first  Infantry,  led  hy  Captain  Alexander 
N.  Stark,  jienetrated  into  the  German  third-line  trenches  in  open 
day,  killed  thi-ee  Ciei-man  soldiers  and  then  escaped  under  heavy  rifle 
and  machine  gun  fire.  One  man  of  the  jmtrol  was  killed  and  another 
wounded. 

Although  several  iVlsatian  deserters  had  heen  received,  the  first 
actual  prisoner  taken  hy  the  Division  was  a  wounded  German  ser- 
geant, captured  hy  a  pati-ol  from  Compam'  I,  Eleventh  Infantry, 
early  on  July  2.'3rd,  in  the  deserted  village  of  Launois  in  No  Man's 
Land.  On  July  ^Tth  a  patrol  of  Company  A,  Sixth  Infantry,  came 
upon  an  enemy  patrol  in  the  village  of  Frapelle,  in  the  Fave  valley. 
The  memhers  of  the  patrol  exhihited  great  hravery  in  the  sharp  fight 
that  ensued.  The  leader,  Ca])taiii  Kohert  M.  Graham,  and  Private 
Alhert  L.  Whitlow  were  killed.  The  remaining  memhers  succeeded 
in  heating  off  the  Boche  patrol  and  regained  the  lines  with  their  cap- 
tain's l)ody.  On  the  night  of  July  30th,  while  going  to  the  rescue  of 
one  of  his  men  who  had  heen  wounded  on  a  pati-ol  heyond  the  Ger- 
man lines,  Cajjtain  Ilayden  P.  Mayers  of  the  Sixty-first  was  killed 
hy  the  enemy.  Second  Lieutenant  Frank  H.  M.  Cash  of  the  Sixty- 
first  was  mortally  wounded  in  a  clash  hetween  patrols  on  August  1st 
and  on  the  12th  Second  I^icutenant  Karl  S.  INIcComh  of  the  Sixtieth 
M'as  killed. 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  69 

Sniping  was  developed  very  successfully.  When  the  Division 
entered  the  lines  the  enemy  was  wont  to  show  himself  unmolested  on 
roads  and  in  fields  behind  his  lines.  But  by  August  not  a  Boche 
could  show  himself  with  safety.  Even  Germans  masquerading  as 
women  were  driven  off  the  roads  by  our  marksmen.  Hungry  Huns 
attempting  to  reach  their  cabbage  and  vegetable  gardens  by  crawling 
on  hands  and  knees  were  often  forced  to  scuttle  to  some  protecting 
shelter  by  our  snipers  or  machine  gims  turned  on  sensitive  points. 
Captain  Doe  of  the  Fifteenth  would  set  up  his  machine  guns  at  some 
favorable  position,  fire  effectively  on  the  Boche,  then  move  to  another 
location  and  enjoj'  seeing  the  enemj'  pour  their  fire  into  his  old 
deserted  emplacement.  Major  Mahin  rigged  up  several  batteries  of 
dimimy  guns,  with  rather  noticeable  camouflage;  the  Germans  fell 
for  the  ruse  and  shelled  the  positions  regularlj',  finally  destroying  the 
stove-pipe  cannon.  Enemy  avions  were  not  allowed  to  sweep  our 
lines  in  peace.  Comiiany  D,  Fourteenth  INIachine  Gun  Battalion, 
secured  the  record  of  shooting  down  the  first  airplane  destroyed  in 
the  Thirty-third  Corps.  No  Man's  Land  was  Oin*  liand.  and  new 
barbed  wire  was  being  constantly  put  in  place  to  keep  off'  the  opjios- 
ing  patrols. 

First  units  of  the  Artillery  Brigade  joined  the  Division  on  July 
28th.  Since  its  coming  to  France  in  June,  the  Fifth  Field  Artillery 
Brigade  and  Ammunition  Train  had  been  in  training  at  La  Valda- 
hon,  a  French  district  camp  near  the  Swiss  Border.  Our  regiments 
had  made  a  record  by  comjileting  their  courses  in  four  weeks  and 
wound  up  their  stay  at  the  training  center  by  staging  a  very  success- 
fid  brigade  firing  problem.  By  August  4th  all  the  batteries  and  the 
train  had  arrived  in  the  St.  Die  area.  At  10  a.  jr.  of  August  8th, 
Brigadier  General  Flagler  took  over  command  of  the  sector  artillery. 
The  Nineteenth  Field  Artillery,  equipped  with  7.5-niillimeter  guns, 
covered  the  area  of  the  Ninth  Brigade,  second  battalion  with  the 
Sixtieth  Infantry  and  first  battalion  with  the  Sixty-first.  The 
Twentieth  Field  Artillery,  also  7.)-millimeter,  placed  its  second 
battalion  with  the  Eleventh  Infantry  and  fii-st  battalion  with  the 
Sixth.  The  three  battalions  of  the  Twenty-first  Field  Artillery,  with 
155-millimeter  howitzers,  were  grouped  so  as  to  cover  the  whole 
sector.  In  addition  to  the  three  American  regiments  and  the  Fifth 
Trench  Mortar  Battery,  General  Flagler  took  over  forty-three 
French  batteries.  The  artillerj'  immediately  began  its  normal  work. 
The  light  75's  prepared  for  barrage  and  harassing  fire  and  the  heavy 
155's  did  counterbattery,  interdiction  and  harassing  fire. 


70  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

The  active  patrolling-  and  raiding  grew  continually  bolder  and 
stronger  as  the  men  became  experienced  in  the  trenches.  The  artil- 
lery took  advantage  of  its  first  opportunity  to  fire  on  real  targets  by 
carrying  out  daily  adjustments  and  by  fire  on  the  roads,  fortified 
points  and  enemy  troops  whenever  occasion  permitted.  The  Boche 
decided  that  a  drive  was  being  prepared.  Reinforcements  began 
moving  into  the  sector  to  resist  the  impending  operation.  In  turn, 
the  Division  was  led  to  believe  that  the  Germans  were  jjreparing  an 
assault.  The  feeling  grew  intense.  At  night  the  wired-in  combat 
groups  in  om-  front  lines  could  hear  the  enemy,  often  not  a  hundred 
yards  away,  at  his  activities.  They  heard  the  rattling  of  the  minen- 
werfers  as  they  were  pulled  into  position  from  the  rear.  They  heard 
the  gutteral  voices  of  the  crews  and  the  booms  as  the  projectiles  were 
started  on  their  way  across  No  Man's  I>and.  As  morning  came  they 
heard  the  sounds  of  the  enemy  retm-ning  his  guns  to  their  places  of 
concealment  in  the  rear. 

IV 

The  Division  was  booked  for  its  first  real  engagement.  Pur- 
suant to  Seventh  Army  orders  (French),  the  Thirty-third  Corps 
(French)  gave  the  I'ifth  Division  the  mission  of  capturing  the  village 
of  Frapelle  and  Hill  4.j1,  just  north  of  the  town.  Fra])elle.  on  the 
northern  edge  of  the  Fave  valley,  lay  nine  kilometers  east  of  St.  Die. 
At  this  jjoint  the  enemy's  lines  formed  a  salient  in  our  system,  so  that 
the  town  and  the  height  above  it  afforded  a  possible  jumping-off  point 
for  an  offensive  up  the  \'alley  toward  St.  Die. 

The  Commanding  General  of  the  Tenth  Brigade  was  designated 
to  carry  out  the  operation  and  he  in  turn  assigned  the  mission  to  the 
third  battalion  of  the  Sixth  Infantry.  Two  platoons  of  Company  A, 
Seventh  Engineers;  the  Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion;  detach- 
ments of  the  Ninth  Field  Signal  Battalion;  the  artillery  of  the  sector, 
both  American  and  French;  a  company  of  French  sector  machine 
guns;  and  Company  A,  Kleventh  Infantry,  as  labor  troojxs,  were 
placed  under  the  command  of  General  Gordon  as  auxiliary  troops. 
Detailed  2)lans  for  the  attack,  for  the  organization  of  the  conquered 
terrain  and  its  suljsequent  occupation,  for  liaison,  evacuation  and 
sujjply,  and  comjjlete  plans  for  artillery  and  machine  gun  sujjport 
were  prepared. 

On  the  evening  of  August  16th  all  was  in  readiness.  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Norton  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  had  personal  conunand  of  the 
operation.  Captain  Leonard  placed  his  attacking  battalion,  with  its 
attached  machine  gun  conqjany,  B  of  the  Fifteenth,  and  one-jjounder 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  71 

and  Stokes  Mortar  sections,  just  behind  the  lines  at  Charmont,  a 
kilometer  west  of  Frapelle.  Major  Peyton  had  the  second  battalion 
of  the  Sixth  Infantry  at  Nayemont,  four  kilometers  directly  west  of 
Frapelle  and  Major  Huddleson  placed  his  first  battalion  at  Vanifoss 
on  the  Fave,  foui'  kilometers  southwest  of  the  town.  Thirty-six  bat- 
teries had  moved  up  to  concealed  emplacements  more  favorable  to 
fire  on  the  area  of  attack,  and  the  Ammunition  Train  had  worked 
diligently  to  bring  up  enough  ammunition  to  meet  any  emergency. 
A  detacliment  of  the  Ninety-ninth  American  Aero  Squadron  was 
detailed  to  give  supremacy  over  the  Boclie  avions.  "H"  hour  was  h 
A.  M.  of  August  17th. 

At  3:j4  a.  IvT.  the  artillerj'  opened  up  on  the  enemy's  lines  with 
a  heavy  barrage.  For  ten  minutes  the  rain  of  high-explosive  and 
gas  poured  on  the  town  of  Frapelle  and  Hill  451,  on  the  Hun 
trenches  and  on  every  known  enemy  battery.  Battery  A  of  the  Nine- 
teenth Field  Artillery  had  trouble  Avith  one  of  the  lights  that  served 
as  an  aiming  point.  Private  Louis  Birtz  went  out  in  front  of  his  gun 
and  held  lighted  matches  up  for  the  gunner  to  sight  the  piece.  All 
through  the  barrage  he  lay  there  with  his  own  75's  firing  just  over 
him  and  with  enemy  shells  bursting  near,  saturating  the  place  with 
gas.  The  Thirteenth  ^Machine  Gun  Battalion  and  the  French  Com- 
pany laid  a  barrage  on  the  exits  and  stj-eets  of  the  town.  Tln-ee  path- 
ways for  the  attack  were  cut  through  the  wire  by  the  Fifth  Trench 
INIortar  Battery.  At  fom*  the  bombardment  changed  to  a  box  bar- 
rage, smoke  shells  were  thrown  into  enemy  observatories,  and  behind 
the  curtain  of  shell  the  infantry  went  over  the  top. 

Companies  L  and  ISI  led  the  assault  while  I  and  K  occupied  the 
trenches  from  which  the  former  departed.  Companies  A  and  C  were 
held  in  support.  Each  assaulting  company  was  deployed  in  four 
waves  and  had  "moppers-up"  of  engineers  and  infantry.  A  platoon 
of  machine  guns  accompanied  each  company  in  its  advance. 

Evidently  the  enemy  was  prepared  for  the  attack,  for  his 
counter-barrage  came  down  upon  the  departure  trench  at  exactly 
4 :06  A.  M.  and  caught  the  second,  third  and  fourth  waves.  With  con- 
siderable losses  the  troops  pressed  through  the  heavy  and  accurate 
barrage  toward  their  objectives.  Company  M  encountered  a  heavy 
machine  gun  barrage  on  Hill  451  and  was  held  up  for  a  time.  The 
lines  were  re-formed,  the  enemy  was  rushed  and  the  height  was  won. 
Company  L  advanced  without  serious  ojiposition  and  occupied 
Frapelle.  With  the  aid  of  the  engineers  enemy  shelte-rs  were  blown 
up  and  dugouts  and  houses  searched.  The  Germans  had  withdrawn 
their  lines  beyond  the  objective,  leaving  only  two  small  posts  in  front. 


~    Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  73 

Two  jjrisoncrs  were  taken  from  one  of  these  posts,  eajitiired  1)\'  the 
accomi)anying  phitoon  of  Company  B,  Fifteenth  ^Machine  Gun 
BattaHon.  The  two  oceupants  of  the  other  post  were  killed  in  the 
assault. 

No  sooner  had  the  troops  <>ained  their  objectives  than  the  Ger- 
man artillery  was  turned  on  Frapelle  and  Hill  J<.51.  At  6:30  a.  m. 
the  deluge  of  fire  began,  which  lasted  with  varying  intensity  for  three 
days  and  nights.  The  men  of  the  Signal  Battalion  had  carried  their 
telephones  and  wire  over  the  top  in  the  first  assault  waves,  to  estab- 
lish communication  to  the  rear  from  the  forward  command  posts.  So 
continuous  was  the  shelling  that  the  telephone  lines  had  to  be  aban- 
doned. All  the  Boche  artillery  in  the  sector  seemed  to  be  firing  on 
the  newly-won  territory.  Back  areas  were  also  shelled.  Large  quan- 
tities of  gas  were  used,  with  concentration  of  mustard.  The  wooded 
areas,  overgrown  with  thick  underbrush  and  filled  with  depressions, 
were  drenched  with  fumes.  Oiu'  troops  stayed  in  Frapelle,  however, 
exactlj'  as  planned,  thinned  out  according  to  schedide  as  soon  as  the 
new  positions  were  securely  organized.  There  were  very  few  gas 
casualties  in  Frapelle,  although  several  men  w'ere  gassed  when  reliefs 
and  working  parties  had  to  pass  through  the  deep  ravines  and  valleys 
leading  across  what  had  been  Xo  jNIan's  Land.  These  valleys  were 
the  only  possible  lines  of  communication  and  they  were  full  of  mus- 
tard gas  all  the  time. 

The  work  of  wiring-in  began  as  soon  as  the  positions  were  occu- 
pied and  continued  steadily  under  the  supervision  of  Companies  A 
and  B,  Seventh  Engineers,  despite  the  continuous  artillery  fire.  Gas 
overcame  many  of  the  parties  working  at  night  on  the  entanglements 
and  the  trenches. 

On  the  18th  the  enemy  attempted  a  counterattack.  It  was 
jjromptly  broken  up  by  our  rifle  and  automatic  rifle  fire  before  it  was 
Avell  started.  Our  heavy  artillery  was  devoted  to  neutralizing  the 
enemy  batteries,  and  with  the  aid  of  the  airplanes  destroyed  one  posi- 
tion completely.  A  Boche  railroad  engine  was  blown  clear  off  its 
track  by  another  battery  of  the  Twenty-first.  Despite  enemy  fire 
and  attacks  our  troops  held  all  their  gains  firmly,  and  by  the  20th 
had  their  new  positions  consolidated.  The  valley  of  the  Fave  was 
wired  and  closed  to  the  enemy. 

Frapelle  was  the  first  operation  of  any  kind  that  the  Division 
had  engaged  in,  and  the  men  went  through  it  splendidly,  like  veteran 
troops.  They  had  advanced  undaunted  in  the  face  of  an  intense  and 
accurate  barrage  and  then  remained  in  the  new  positions  subjected 
for  three  days  and  nights  to  constant  ai-tillery  fire  and  continuous 


74  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

danger  from  gas.  The  casualties  were  rather  severe,  amounting  to 
sixteen  per  cent  of  the  troops  engaged,  besides  many  shght  cases  of 
gassing  that  were  not  reported  to  the  Division  Surgeon.  Among 
officers  there  were:  One,  First  Lieutenant  Louis  A.  Freeman,  of  the 
Sixth,  died  of  wounds;  five  severely  wounded  and  nineteen  slightly 
wounded.  Enlisted  casualties  were:  31  killed,  4  died  of  wounds,  13 
missing,  75  severely  Avounded  and  218  slightly  wounded.  Over  one 
hundred  and  fifty  of  the  wounded  were  gas  cases,  not  so  serious  but 
that  the  men  were  back  on  duty  in  a  week  or  two. 

The  operation,  although  a  minor  one,  received  considerable  com- 
ment in  the  French  and  American  ])ress.  It  was  the  only  change 
that  had  taken  place  on  this  fi-ont  in  three  years.  The  loss  of  Fra- 
pelle  even  occasioned  some  disturbance  in  the  German  high  command, 
for  in  their  official  comnnmique  of  August  18th  was  the  statement: 

"Army  Group  of  Duke  Albrecht — In  the  Vosges  our  advanced 
posts  along  the  Fave  as  far  as  Frapelle  withdrew  according  to  order 
under  a  hostile  attack." 

Praise  for  the  ability  and  bravery  shown  by  the  Fifth  Division 
in  its  operation  was  given  by  General  de  Boussoudy,  commanding 
the  Seventh  French  Army,  in  a  letter  to  General  JMcMahon:  "The 
American  Fifth  Division  carried  out  yesterday  its  first  operation  of 
the  war.  It  penetrated  far  into  the  enemy  defenses,  quickly  attained 
its  objectives,  and  holds  them  secin-ely.  I  extend  my  sincerest  con- 
gratulations to  you  personally  for  the  manner  in  which  the  operation 
was  planned  and  staged.  I  request  you  to  congratulate  for  me  the 
trooiJS  who  participated  in  the  attack.  This  operation  is  a  fitting  fare- 
well from  the  gallant  Fifth  Division  to  its  French  conu-ades  upon  its 
departm'e." 

This  message  was  published  to  the  command  in  General  Orders, 
along  with  the  Commanding  General's  own  appreciation  of  the  work 
of  the  Division,  as  follows : 

"The  Division  Commander  desires  to  exjjress  his  deep  appreci- 
ation of  the  courage,  dash  and  fortitude  shown  by  the  officers  and  men 
in  the  attack  on  the  Frapelle  jjosition  and  the  subsequent  occupation 
of  the  line.  All  ranks  engaged  gave  evidence  of  a  soldierly  bearing 
which  auguis  well  for  the  futiu'e  success  of  the  Division  when  engaged 
in  more  important  operations. 

"Whatever  credit  may  be  attributed  to  the  higher  command  for 
the  success  of  the  operation  rightfully  belongs  to  Brigadier  General 
W.  H.  Gordon,  commanding  the  Tenth  Brigade,  who  was  in  direct 
charge  of  the  preparation  and  execution  of  the  attack.     Individual 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  75 

acts  of  courage  and  gallantry  will  be  published  to  the  command  in 
later  orders." 

On  August  20th  orders  came  from  the  Thirty-third  Corps 
(French)  for  the  relief  of  the  Division.  Tlie  Ninety-second  (col- 
ored) Division  had  anived  to  enter  the  lines  under  French  tutelage. 
The  Fifth  was  to  proceed  to  the  Arches  area  above  Epinal  for  rest 
and  further  training.  Reliefs  were  begun  on  the  night  of  the  20th  and 
completed  by  the  26th.  Comirunand  of  the  sector  passed  to  the  Gen- 
eral commanding  the  Eighty-seventh  Division  (French)  at  9  a.  m.  of 
the  23rd. 

General  LeConte  of  the  Thirty-third  Corps  bade  farewell  to  the 
men  of  the  Red  Diamond  in  a  letter  to  General  McMahon: 

"Now  that  the  gallant  division  which  you  command  is  leaving 
the  Gerardmer  sector,  where  it  arrived  three  months  ago,  I  express 
my  profound  gratitude  for  the  very  loyal  support  that  your  troops 
and  you  have  given  us  in  the  role  which  we  are  entrusted  to  play  for 
the  time  being  on  the  Vosges  front. 

"A  few  days  ago  in  a  local  operation  which  was  perfectly  con- 
ceived and  energetically  conducted  and  whose  objectives  were  aceom- 
l^lished  despite  violent  and  prolonged  counter  activity  of  the  enemj', 
your  regiments  and  you  proved  what  mettle  highei-  authority  may 
expect  to  find  in  you,  perhaps  within  a  short  period. 

"I  wish  also  to  call  particular  attention  to  the  affecting  cordiality 
that  has  at  all  times  chai'acterized  the  daily  intercourse  of  the  staff 
and  troops  of  the  Fiftli  Divisioji  and  the  Thirty-thii-d  Army  Corps. 
This  ever  present  cordiality  has  enabled  us  completely  to  overcome 
the  difficulties  that  inevitably  result  from  differences  in  organization 
and  language.  We  are  marching  together  towards  our  goal  in  com- 
plete agreement  of  sentiment  and  thought  that  will  facilitate  and  as- 
sure our  arrival  there. 

"It  is  in  this  spirit  that  I  request  you  to  inform  the  officers  and 
troops  under  your  command  of  my  entire  satisfaction  with  them  and 
to  express  to  them  with  my  thanks  all  my  good  wishes  for  their  pros- 
perity and  glory." 

Division  Headquarters  was  at  Arches  from  August  23rd  to  29th. 
General  Gordon  was  promoted  here  to  Major  General  and  left  the 
Tenth  Brigade  to  take  command  of  the  Sixth  Division.  He  was  suc- 
ceeded by  Colonel  Paul  B.  ISIalone,  who  came  from  the  command  of 
the  Twenty-third  Infantry  of  the  Second  Division  that  had  fought 
in  the  Chateau-Thierry  operations  and  in  the  Aisne-Marne  offensive, 
between  Soissons  and  Rheims.     Colonel  Hickok,  Chief  of  Staff,  had 


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Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  11 

been  promoted  to  Brigadier  General.     Colonel  C.  A.  Trott  became 
Chief  of  Staff  on  July  24.tli. 

The  first  two  days  in  the  Arches  area  were  given  the  troops  for 
rest,  cleaning  up  and  issuing  new  equipment.  It  had  been  a  strenu- 
ous two  months  in  the  trenches.  Replacements  of  men  and  animals 
were  received.  Training  was  started  to  fit  the  men  for  movement 
warfare.  Close-order  drill  was  employed  to  restore  the  discipline 
tliat  had  tended  to  become  lax  at  the  front.  Schools  in  gas,  liaison, 
machine  gun,  mortar  and  rifle  firing  were  opened.  Terrain  j^i'ob- 
lems  for  com2>anies  and  battalions  were  planned. 


78  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


ENLISTED  MEN   KILLED  IN  ACTION 
ANOULD  SECTOR 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 

*Pvt.  Jolin  Butero,  Co.  G.  *Pvt.  Thomas  Marallo,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  David  Fannick,  Co.  G.  Pvt.  James  F.  Mungavin,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Harry  Levan,  Co.  G.  *Pfc.  John  Ostrowski,  Co.  G. 

Corp.  Bennie  Miller,  Co.  H. 

SLXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 

Pvt.  Tony  Cimino,  Co.  L.  Pvt.  Antonio  Wolpi,  Co.  I-. 

Pvt.  Elzie  H.  Moore,  Co.  L.  Pvt.  Morris  Keronsky,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Alpio  Souppo,  Co.  L.  Corp.  John  J.  Simcoe,  Co.  M. 

*Pvt.  WiUiam  Upton,  Co.  L.  Pvt.  Richard  J.  Wei.se,  Co.  M. 

*Pvt.  John  Wilson,  Co.  M. 

SIXTH  INFANTRY 
*Pvt.  Jesse  B.  Emmons,  Co.  A.  Pvt.  James  H.  Poe,  Co.  B. 

ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 

Pvt.  Corwin  Reese,  Hq.  Co.  *Pvt.  Oscar'  W.  Zuelsdorf,  Co.  C. 

*Sgt.  Homer  Earl,  Co.  A.  Cook  Albert  Eichelberger,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Kanieski,  Co.  I. 

FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
Pvt.  John  J.  MuOen,  Co.  A. 

(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  79 


ENLISTED  MEN  KILLED  IN  ACTION 
ST.  DIE  SECTOR 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 

•Sgt.  John  Marshall,  Co.  C.  Pvt.  Marion  Stankowicz,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Charles  L.  Ackley,  Co.  H. 

SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 

Pvt.  Oscar  S.  Mitchell,  M.  G.  Co.  Pvt.  Charles  E.  Cummings,  Co.  G. 

•Pvt.  John  Androzeiviez,  Co.  C.  Pvt.  Timotliy  O'Meara,  Co.  G. 

*Pvt.  Terenty  Werbicky,  Co.  C.  Pfc.  Walter  E.  Smith,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  .'\rchie"Watkins,  Co.  F.  Pvt.  Daniel  J.  Wanzie,  Co.  I. 

SIXTH  INFANTRY 

Pvt.  Frederick  Morris,  M.  G.  Co.  Pvt.  Walter  W.  Brandt,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Albert  L.  Whitlow,  Co.  A.  *Pvt.  Gentry  Nesbest,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  James  D.  McCarthy,  Co.  B.  Pvt.  Frank  Zoltowski,  Med.  Det. 

ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 

*Pfc.  Herbert  Wilson,  M.  G.  Co.  Pvt.  William  Taylor,  Co.  .\. 

Pvt.  Daniel  Stoever,  Co.  A.  Pvt.  Oscar  H.  Reynolds,  Co.  H. 

1st  Sgt.  Robert  W.  Yazell,  Co.  H. 

NINETEENTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 
*Pvt.  Howard  S.  Riseing,  Battery  B. 

(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


80  Hisinry  of  the  Fifth  Division 


ENLISTED  MEN   KILLED  IN  ACTION 
FRAPELLE  OPERATION 

SIXTH  INFANTRY 

Pvt.  Ambers  Sapp.  Hq.  Co.  Pvt.  John  S.  Pelfrey,  Co.  L. 

Bug.  Richard  O.  Wagner,  M.  G.  Co.  Pvt.  William  H.   Brooks,  Co.  M. 

Sgt.  Thomas  D.  Applewhite,  Co.  A.  Pvt.  George  P.  Coop,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Eura  Boitnott,  Co.  A.  Pvt.  John  S.  Doty,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  William  A.  Robins,  Co.  A.  Pvt.  Cornelius  Fredericks,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  William  R.  Cotton,  Co.  L.  Sgt.  Wallace  Green,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Curtis  Littleton,  Co.  M. 

FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Pvt.  Anton  S.  Blazek,  Co.  B.  *Pvt.  Charles  Palermo,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Robert  L.  Gee,  Co.  B.  Pvt.  Clarence  Prunty,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  James  D.  McDonald,  Co.  B.  Pvt.  Herman  E.  Rennie,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Williaui  H.  Weitzel,  Co.  B. 

SEVENTH   ENGINEERS 

Pfc.  Giuseppe  .Mberalle  Pvt.  Charles  E.  Germain 

*Pvt.  Carl  J.  Boyer  Pfc.  Charles  T.  Sampson 

*Pfc.   Herl)ert  I.  Wilson 

THIRTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
Pvt.  Thomas  M.  Hayden,  Co.  A. 

FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIN 

Sgt.  Clement  E.  Diefenthal  Pfc.  George  H.   Kuhn 

Pvt.  Joseph  W.  Green  Pvt.  Otto  E.  Kintzi 

Pvt.  Ji.bn  J.  L.  Mooney 

(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  81 


EATTALION   AND   HIGHER   COMMANDERS    IN    FIFTH    DIVISION 
IN  ANOULD  AND  ST.  DIE  SECTORS 

Major  General  John  E.  McMahon,  Commanding  Division. 
First  Lieutenant  Leslie  \V.  Deverciix,  Aide  de  Camp. 

GENER.KL  STAFF 

Colonel  Howard  R.  Hiclvok,  Chief  of  StaflF  to  July  I8th. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Robert  G.  Peck,  Acting  Chief  of  Staff  July  19th  to  2:M. 

Colonel  Clement  A.  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff  from  July  24.th. 

Major  Martin  C.  Shallenberger,  .Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1. 

Major  Herbert  Parsons,  .Assistant  Chief  of  Staff',  G-2. 

Major  John  B.  Barnes,  .Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-3. 

PRINCIPAL  STAFF  OFFICERS 

Colonel  Robert  H.  Pierson,  Division  Surgeon. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Gilbert  M.  .Mien,  Division  Machine  Ciun  Officer. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Ward   Dabney,  Division  Quartermaster. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Robert  (i.  Peck,  Division  Inspector. 

Major  P.  James  Cosgrave,  Division  Judge  Advocate. 

Major  Thomas  Ci.  Hayes,  Division  Ordnance  Officer. 

Major  Charles  F.  Leonard,  Division  Signal  Officer. 

Major  David  P.  Wood,  Division  .Adjutant. 

First  Lieutenant  A.  M.  Fisher,  Division  Gas  Officer. 

First  Lieutenant  Thomas  A.  Knight,  Secretary  to  General  Staff. 

NINTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner,  Commanding  Brigade. 
First  Lieutenant  P>ank  M.  Smith.  .Aide  de  Camp. 
Second  Lieutenant  Rowland  H.  Peacock,  .Aide  de  Camp. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  R.  McC.  Beck,  Brigade  .Adjutant  to  .Tuly  17th. 
Major  James  D.  Rivet,  Brigade  .Adjutant  from  July  ISth. 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Douglas  Settle,  Commanding  regiment  to  July  30tli. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Bertram  P.  Johnson,  Commanding  regiment  July  .Slst  to  .August   ITth. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Vernon  W.  Boiler,  Conuiianding  regiment  from  August  LStli. 

Captain  Matthew  .A.  Palen,  Comnumding  first  battalion  to  .August  lltli. 

Captain   Robert  B.  Lorch,  Conunanding  tirst  battalion  from  August  l'2tli  to  ISth. 

Captain  Charles  AV.  Jones,  Conunanding  first  battalion  from  .August   19tli. 

Major  Vernon  AV.  Boiler,  Comuutnding  second  battalion  to  .August  17th. 

Major  AV'illiam  E.  Morehouse,  Commanding  second  liattalion  from  .August   18th. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Bertram  P.  J(jhns(jn,  Commanding  third  l)attalion  to  July  Gtli. 

Major  Lee  D.  Davis,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  Jul}'  7th. 

SIXTA'-FIRST  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Hugh  D.  AVise,  Commanding  regiment. 

Major  AValter  F.  L.  Hartigan,  Commanding  first  liattalion  to  August  -tth. 

Captain  Lawrence  B.  Glasgow,  Commanding  first  battalion,  August  .5th  to  19th. 

Major  Donald  Henley,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  August  20th. 

Major  Charles  C.  Bankhead,  Commanding  .second  battalion. 

Major  John  J.  Burleigh,  Commanding  third  battalion  to  August  2nd. 

Major  Lowe  A.  McClure,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  .August  .3rd. 

FOURTEENTH   MACHINE   GUN   BATTALION 

Major  Frederick  .A.  Barker,  Commanding  battalion  to  .August  10th. 
Major  Jens  A.  Doe,  Commanding  battalion  from  .August  11th. 


82  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

TENTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Walter  H.  Gordon,  Commanding  brigade. 
First  I^ieutenant  Joseph    H.    Hinwood,   Jr.,  Aide  de  Camp. 
First  Lieutenant  Malcolm  H.  Ivy,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Captain  George  H.  van  de  Steeg,  Brigade  Adjutant. 

SIXTH  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Edwin  A.  Winans,  Commanding  regiment  to  July  11th. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  E.  M.  Norton,  Commanding  regiment  July  12th  to  August  14th. 

Colonel  Henry  J.  Hunt,  Commanding  regiment  from  August  15th. 

Major  George  H.  Huddleson,  Commanding  first  battalion. 

Major  Philip  B.  Peyton,  Commanding  second  battalion. 

Major  R.  A.  Jones,  Commanding  third  battalion  to  July  7th. 

Major  Courtney  H.  Hodges,  Commanding  tliird  battalion  July  8tli  to  August  11th. 

Major  John  W.  I-eonard,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  August  12th. 

ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 

Colonel  John  B.  Bennet,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  Everett  D.  Barlow,  Commanding  first  battalion  to  July  1st. 
Major  Frank  C.  Mahin,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  July  2nd. 
Major  John  H.  Muncaster,  Commanding  second  battalion  from  June  20th. 
Major  Ralph  W.  Kingman,  Commanding  tliird  liattalion  to  June  27th. 
Major  Everett  D.  Barlow,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  July  1st. 

FIFTEENTH   MACHINE   GUN   BATTALION 

Major  John  H.  Muncaster,  Commanding  battalion  to  June  19tli. 
Captain  Jens  A.  Doe,  Couniianding  battalion  June  20th  to  .\ugust  10th. 
Major  W.  M.  Grimes,  Commanding  liattalion  from  .\ugust  11th. 

FIFTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler,  Commanding  brigade. 
First  Lieutenant  Jacltson  A.  Boyd,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Second  Lieutenant  Howard  F.  Fletcher,  Aide  de  Caiup. 
Major  John  Magruder,  Brigade  Adjutant. 

NINETEENTH  FIELD  .\RTILLERY 

Colonel  Conrad  H.  Lanza.  Commanding  regiment  to  August  21st. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  C.  P.  Hollingsworth,  Couuuanding  regiment  from  .\ugust  22nd. 

Major   Robert  S.  Donaldson,  Commanding  first  battalion  to  August  8th. 

Major  Herman  Beukema,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  Augu.st  9th. 

Major  Karl  C.  Greenwald,  Commanding  second  battalion  to  August  8th. 

Major  Walter  S.  Winton,  Commanding  second  battalion  August  9th  to  17th. 

Major  John  S.  MacTaggart,  Couunanding  second  battalion  from  August  18th. 

TWENTIETH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonel  Brook  Payne,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  R.  C.  Batson,  Commanding  first  battalion  to  ,\ugust  4th. 
Major  Cuyler  L.  Clark,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  August  5th. 
Major  George  L.  Miller,  Couunanding  .second  battalion. 

TWENTY-FIRST  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonel  Richard  H.  McMaster,  Commanding  regiment. 

Major  George  A.  Seaman,  Couunanding  first  battalion  to  August  10th. 

Major  John  H.  Wallace,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  August  11th. 

Major  Jean  A.  .leancon.  Commanding  second  battalion. 

Major  Clyde  A.  Selleck,  Commanding  third  battalion. 


Trench  Warfare — Frapelle  83 


SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 

Colonel  Lewis  M.  Adams,  Commanding  regiment. 

Major  Oscar  O.  Kuentz,  Commanding  first  battalion. 

Major  Earl  E.  Gesler,  Commanding  second  battalion  to  July  1st. 

Major  Thomas  D.  Finley,  Conianding  second  battalion  July  2nd  to  August  1211). 

Major  Willis  E.  Teale,  Commanding  second  battalion  from  August  13tb, 

First  Lieutenant  Peter  Murphy,  Commanding  train. 

THIRTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Major  Gilbert  M.  Allen,  Commanding  battalion  to  July  4th. 
Major  Walton  H.  Walker,  Commanding  battalion  from  July  .5th. 

NINTH  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 

Major  Henry  W.  Hall.  Commanding  battalion. 

HEADQUARTERS  TROOP 

Captain  Lovejoy  Newton,  Commanding  troop  to  July  1st. 
Captain  Eugene  M.  Thomasson,  Comanding  troop  from  July  2nd. 

FIFTH  DIVISION  TRAINS 

Colonel  William  M.  Morrow,  Commanding  trains  to  June  29th. 
Major  Oral  E.  Clark,  Commanding  trains  June  30th  to  July  21st. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Harry  E.  Comstoek,  Commanding  trains  from  July  22n(l. 

FIFTH  SUPPLY  TRAIN 

Captain  Taylor  Belcher,  Conunanding  train  to  July  21st. 
Major  Oral  E.  Clark,  Commanding  train  from  July  22nd. 

FIFTH  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Harry  E.  Comstock,  Commanding  train  to  July  21st. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  R.  John  West,  Conunanding  train  from  July  22nd. 
Major  S.  A.  Campbell,  Commanding  motor  battalion  to  July  24th. 
Major  Frederick  A.  Barker,  Conunanding  motor  battalion  from  August  loth. 
Major  R.  John  West,  Commanding  horsed  battalion  to  .July  22nd. 
Captain  Raymond  Dickson,  Comtnanding  horsed  battalion  from  .luly  23rd. 

FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIN 

Major  Albert  Pfeiffer,  Commanding  train  to  June  20th. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Carey  J.  Vaux,  Conunanding  train  from  June  21.st. 
Captain  Samuel  Hamilton,  Jr.,  Director  Field  Hospitals  to  June  19th. 
Major  Albert  Pfeiffer,  Director  of  Field  Hospitals  June  20th  to  July  2nd. 
Major  Dana  W.  Drury,  Director  of  Field  Hospitals  from  July  3rd. 
Major  John  I.  Robison,  Director  of  Ambulance  Companies. 

FIFTH  MILITARY  POLICE 
Major  William  H.  Gill,  Commanding  battalion. 


Chapter  III 
THE  ST.  ]MIIIIEL  OPKRATIOX 


X  Aimust  'JSth  came  the  first  of  the  orders  that 
hrought  tlie  Fifth  Division  to  participate  in  the 
first  ail-American  operation  of  the  war.  In 
Au<j;ust  and  early  September  the  American  First 
Ai-my  was  being  organized.  Its  first  mission 
w  as  to  be  the  reduction  of  the  St.  ]Mihiel  salient — 
that  Avedge  in  the  line  between  Verdun  and  Pont- 
a-Mousson  with  its  apex  at  St.  Mihiel,  a  spear- 
liead  pointed  at  Paris  and  the  heart  of  France, 
always  a  menace  to  the  strength  of  the  Allied  line  and  an  enemy 
buttress  against  which  France  had  vainly  dashed  her  strength 
throughout  the  past  four  years  of  war. 

The  Fifth  Division  was  ordered  to  proceed  from  the  Arches 
training  area  to  the  hilly  country  on  the  Moselle,  southwest  of  Lune- 
ville.  Division  Headquarters  were  established  at  Neuvillers-sur- 
Moselle  on  the  29tli  and  the  ti'oops  proceeded  to  their  billeting  areas 
by  marching  and  by  bus.    xill  units  were  moved  by  the  30th. 

The  training  schedules  were  resmiied,  Avith  particular  attention 
and  emphasis  on  open  warfare  methods.  Exercises  of  advancing  with 
only  maps  and  compasses  were  carried  out  by  companies  and  bat- 
talions. The  rough,  wooded  slopes  of  the  ]Moselle  were  ideal  for  such 
instruction.  Rifle  and  machine  gun  firing  was  pushed  to  qualify  re- 
cruits for  skirmishing.  As  gas  training,  every  officer  and  enlisted 
man  was  required  to  Avear  a  mask  half  an  hour  daily.  All  kinds  of 
liaison — betAveen  the  different  infantry  units,  betAveen  infantry  and 
airplanes,  betAA'cen  infantry  and  artillery — Avere  studied. 

Orders  came  on  September  4th  ff)r  the  Division  to  move  into  the 
sector  assigned  to  it  for  the  impending  operation.  Absolute  secrecy 
was  maintained  as  to  the  plans  and  no  one  except  the  necessary  higher 
authorities  knew  the  destination  of  the  Division  nor  the  mission  it  was 
to  perform.     Certainly  even  the  loA\-liest  private  felt  that  something 


86  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

was  in  the  air;  but  whether  the  Division  was  moving  for  an  attack,  a 
rush  to  strengthen  a  hne  against  an  enenij'  drive,  or  merely  training 
for  future  activity  was  only  speculation.  To  prevent  the  troop  move- 
ments being  discovered  liy  the  enemy,  or  even  becoming  known  to  the 
native  population,  all  marching  was  by  night.  No  lights  were  per- 
mitted. Travel  was  not  begun  till  8  p.  M.  and  stops  were  made  before 
4  A.  M,  By  day  troops  and  trains  camped  in  woods  and  remained 
securely  concealed. 

The  area  aroimd  Martincom-t  was  the  destination  of  the  Fifth 
Division.  Headquarters  were  established  in  that  town  on  Sejjtember 
8th.  The  fifty-kilometer  march  from  the  Moselle  district  was  begim 
by  the  artillery  on  the  4th,  by  the  engineers  and  trains  on  the  .^th  and 
by  the  infantry  on  the  Gth.  Those  forced  night  marches  stand  out 
most  vividly  in  the  mind  of  every  man  in  the  Division.  It  was  the 
first  hurry-up  march  the  troops  had  undergone;  the  weather  was  one 
continuous  downpour  of  rain;  the  roads  were  slippery  and  wound 
over  steep  hills  and  through  wet  woods;  as  the  organization  ap- 
jjroaehed  the  lines  the  traffic  on  the  highways  grew  denser  and  denser 
until  those  arteries  were  solid-streams  of  vehicles  and  men,  with  a 
current  in  either  direction. 

Orders  were  that  the  artillery  should  be  in  the  sector  and  in  posi- 
tion by  September  8th;  but  the  enormous  traffic  on  the  roads,  the 
scarcity  and  wretched  condition  of  the  horses  and  the  incessant  rain 
made  it  impossible  to  complete  the  march  on  time.  Forage  was 
scarce,  water  was  often  unobtainable.  Horses  died  along  the  road  or 
had  to  be  abandoned  to  the  mercy  of  French  peasants.  The  muddy 
ground  made  the  entrances  and  exits  of  woods  extremely  difficult; 
sometimes  as  much  as  three  hours  were  consumed  merely  in  getting 
organizations  out  of  the  woods  and  on  the  road.  The  strain  on  men 
and  animals  was  terrific.  Sleep  was  almost  unheard  of.  On  Sep- 
tember 9th  the  batteries  began  arriving  in  the  sector  and  the  Fifth 
Field  Artillery  Brigade  P.  C.  (poste  de  commandement)  was  estab- 
lished at  Martincourt. 

The  trains,  mostly  motorized,  were  not  so  overwhelmed  with 
difficulties  as  the  artillery,  although  rain  and  mud  and  traffic  jam- 
ming l)rought  perpetual  discomfort  and  strain.  The  Supply  Train 
was  bus}'  night  and  day  liauling  supplies  into  the  divisional  area  pre- 
paratory to  the  drive.  The  Ammunition  Train  went  into  Bois  de  la 
Rappe,  south  of  Martincourt.  Trucks  floundered  in  the  soft  earth 
while  the  men  worried  over  filling  their  dumps  with  amnuinition.  In 
tlie  dense  woods  Colonel  West  and  Captain  Brinckerhoff  of  the  Train 
and  Lieutenant  Walker  of  the  Artillery  Brigade  ran  into  a  cloud  gas 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  87 

attack  and  saved  themselves  by  putting  on  their  masks  at  record 
speed.  After  they  had  ahnost  suffocated,  a  doughboy  came  to  their 
rescue  and  informed  the  officers  tliat  the  gas  was  only  the  clouds  re- 
sulting from  smoke  bomb  practice  by  a  company  of  infantry!  The 
Sanitary  Train  was  established  in  ^'illey  St.  Ettiene,  with  a  Field 
Hospital  and  Ambidance  Company  at  St.  Jean.  Engineers,  Train 
Headquarters  and  jNIilitary  Police  were  at  Martincourt.  The  M. 
P.'s  were  given  their  first  real  test  in  handling  the  traffic  on  the  roads 
leading  to  the  front.  Tliej'  were  handicapped  by  lack  of  ex^ierience 
in  such  jams.  Comjjany  A  had  been  transferred  to  the  First  Ai-my. 
Officers  and  men  exhausted  themselves  in  the  gigantic  task  of  keeping 
the  roads  clear,  many  doing  forty-eight-hour  shifts  without  sleep. 

One  M.  P.  knew  his  job  thoroughly.  As  this  traffic  cop  was 
patrolling  a  road  reserved  for  animal-drawn  transportation,  a  big 
automobile  tried  to  force  its  way  through.  The  M.  P.  promjjtly 
halted  the  machine,  with  the  threat,  "I'll  shoot  if  you  move  another 
inch."  He  probably  didn't  notice  the  four  stars.  The  Conunander- 
in-Chief  of  the  A.  E.  F.  alighted  from  his  auto  and  congratulated 
the  private  with  the  remark,  "You  are  the  first  M.  P.  I  have  found 
doing  his  duty." 

II 

The  German  position  in  this  salient  that  the  American  Army 
planned  to  reduce  was  naturally  strong.  The  Cotes-de-Meuse,  bor- 
dering the  river  on  the  east  and  forming  the  enemy's  western  line 
of  defense,  were  a  rugged  chain  of  hills  rising  about  450  feet  very 
sharply  from  the  INIeuse  valley.  They  were  heavily  wooded  and 
deeply  cut  b)^  ravines  in  all  directions.  From  a  conical  hill  just  south 
of  St.  Mihiel,  the  Camp  des  Romains,  the  German  trenches  stretched 
northwai'd  along  the  Cotes  for  about  twenty  kilometers.  Then  they 
turned  in  a  northeast  direction  and  descended  into  the  lowlands  of 
the  Woevres,  that  Hat,  swamjjy  area  lying  between  the  hills  of  the 
Meuse  and  the  hills  of  the  Moselle.  Thus  the  terrain  was  admirably 
suited  to  a  stubborn  defense.  The  only  feasible  point  of  attack  on 
the  whole  western  face  was  where  the  lines  left  the  Cotes  to  descend 
into  the  Woevres. 

To  the  east  of  St.  Mihiel,  the  German  lines  reached  thirty  kilo- 
meters to  the  Moselle,  a  couple  of  kilometers  above  Pont-a-Mousson. 
The  ground  was  very  rough  from  Camp  des  Romains  uj)  to  height 
Mont  Sec;  then  came  a  few  kilometers  of  marshy  ground.  Eastward 
lay  the  rolling  hills  west  of  the  Moselle,  well  wooded  and  cut  fre- 
quently by  ravines.    A  fairly  good  avenue  of  attack  existed  near  the 


5^ 


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The  St.  Mihicl  Operation  89 

middle,  in  the  region  Seieheprey-Flirey-Liniey.  Thus  the  plan  of 
the  operation  was  to  cut  off  the  salient  by  pincer-like  drives  from  the 
west  and  from  the  south.  The  forces  should  meet  in  the  line  Thiau- 
court-Vigneulles,  with  the  object  of  isolating  the  enemy  in  the  point 
of  the  salient. 

The  Germans  had  foreseen  the  possible  necessity  of  withdrawal 
from  the  St.  Mihiel  salient  and  had  constructed  in  a  fairly  straight 
line  from  north  of  Verdun  to  above  Pont-a-Mousson  a  section  of  the 
famous  Hindenl)urg  Line,  defended  by  wire  and  countless  concrete 
pillboxes  and  strongholds.  The  area  Ijetween  the  withdrawal  posi- 
tion and  the  front  lines  was  also  well  studded  with  secondary  combat 
positions,  concreted  and  capable  of  strong  defense. 

Foui'teen  American  divisions  were  gathered  for  the  operation. 
On  the  west,  or  left  pincer,  were  the  Twenty-sixth  and  Fourth  Divi- 
sions with  a  French  unit.  On  the  south  or  right  pincer  were  in  line, 
from  the  Moselle  westward,  the  Fighty-second,  Ninetieth,  Fifth, 
Second,  Eighty-Ninth,  Forty-second  and  First  Divisions.  In  re- 
serve were  the  Third,  Thirty-fifth,  Seventy-eighth,  Eightieth  and 
Ninety-first  Divisions.  French  Colonials  held  the  point  where  no 
drive  was  to  be  pushed. 

The  2)art  assigned  the  Fifth  Division  was  to  act  as  the  right  edge 
of  the  right  pincer.  The  sector  was  about  a  third  of  the  way  from  the 
Moselle  to  St.  Mihiel,  only  two  kilometers  wide.  It  was  described  as 
running  "from  one-half  kilometer  east  of  Remenauville  to  the  road 
fork  one  kilometer  east  of  Regnieville."  The  mission  was  to  drive 
practically  due  north,  about  eight  kilometers,  to  the  Hindenburg 
Line.  The  village  of  Vie\ille-en-Haye  lay  in  the  sector  to  be  taken 
by  the  Red  Diamond. 

The  rear  area  of  the  Division  was  a  narrow  strip  extending  back 
of  the  sector  front  for  a  distance  of  about  twenty  kilometers.  It  was 
limited,  on  the  east  by  the  road  fork  one  kilometer  east  of  Regnieville- 
en-Haye,  Mamey  (exclusive),  Rogeville  (exclusive),  Jaillon  (in- 
clusive), Francheville  (exclusive)  ;  on  the  west  by  point  one-half  kilo- 
meter east  of  Remenauville,  le  Haricot,  eastern  edge  of  Bois  de  la 
Rappe,  Tremblecourt  (inclusive),  Avrainville  (inclusive),  Franche- 
ville (exclusive).  Martincourt  was  the  only  town  of  the  area  and 
lay  at  about  the  center  of  the  sector,  eight  kilometers  from  the  lines. 

Running  up  to  Martincoiu't  from  the  southeast,  there  extended 
tow^ard  the  lines  a  deep  valley,  winding  and  walled  in  by  wooded  hills. 
A  kilometer  up  the  valley  lay  St.  Jean,  a  tiny  village  little  disturbed 
by  the  war  of  four  years.  Two  kilometers  further  up  the  ravine  was 
St.  Jacques,  like  St.  Jean,  small  and  sheltered  by  the  deep  valley. 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  91 

Thence  the  valley  wound  northward  till  it  reached  the  Metz-St.  Dizier 
highway  at  the  Metz  Bridge,  scarce  three  kilometers  from  the  oppos- 
ing line  of  trenches.  East  of  the  sinuous  canyon  was  Bois  dit  la 
Lampe,  with  Mamey  on  its  borders.  On  the  west  were  Bois  dit  le 
Haut  Chemin  and  Bois  de  St.  Jacques.  Proceeding  north  of  the 
Metz  highway  one  penetrated  on  the  left  of  the  continuing  valley 
Bois  dit  la  Chambrotte  and  on  the  right  Bois  dit  Jolival  and  Bois  dit 
le  Brule.  In  these  woods  were  the  main  defenses  of  the  P^rench  sys- 
tem. Continuing  forward  over  numerous  ridges  and  swales  one 
reached  the  French  first-line  trenches,  protected  everywhere  by  wide 
stretches  of  wire  entanglements. 

The  town  of  Regnieville-en-Haye,  about  the  middle  of  the  Divi- 
sion's front,  reduced  to  mere  piles  of  stones  and  mortar  by  the  four 
years'  conflict,  lay  just  inside  the  French  outpost  lines.  The  Pont- 
a-Mousson-Thiaucourt  highway  ran  across  the  sector  diagonally  from 
right  to  left.  In  Regnieville  it  was  but  a  mere  stretch  of  shell-holes 
and  obstructions.  Further  on  in  German  territory  the  road  was 
known  to  be  full  of  mines  and  traps,  prepared  to  resist  possible  in- 
vaders. 

Intensive  study  of  all  the  maps  and  information  of  the  sector, 
with  careful  reconnaissances  brought  forth  Field  Order  No.  -ll  at 
noon  of  September  9th — the  Division  order  for  the  operation.  The 
past  stability  of  the  line  in  this  vicinity  had  given  ample  opportunity 
to  study  all  the  German  defenses,  and  the  order  was  a  model  of  de- 
tailed plans  for  attack. 

Acting  in  accordance  with  the  directions  to  take  over  the  sector, 
the  Nineteenth,  Twentieth  and  Twenty-first  Field  Artillery  went 
into  position  east  of  Bois  dit  la  Lampe.  near  the  Metz  road,  on  the 
10th  and  11th.  The  positions  were  poor,  for  the  good  ground  had 
already  been  occupied  by  the  additional  artillery  that  had  been  at- 
tached to  the  Division  for  the  operation.  Nine  75  batteries  of  the 
219th  R.  A.  C.  (French) ,  two  220  and  two  1.55  batteries  of  the  182nd 
Regiment  (French)  and  six  8-inch  batteries  of  the  Fifty-ninth 
C.  A.  C.  (American)  -were  crowded  into  the  narrow  sector  to  rein- 
force the  regular  divisional  artillery.  The  front  fairly  bristled  with 
cannon,  a  gun  to  every  fifteen  meters. 

The  infantry  of  the  Division  left  the  Moselle  area  south  of  Nancy 
on  the  6th  and  by  night  marches  reached  the  territory  Martincourt- 
Saizerais  by  September  10th.  The  blackness  of  the  nights  and  the 
perpetual  rain  exhausted  everyone.  The  Military  Police  especially 
were  called  upon  for  supreme  effort,  for  they  had  to  act  as  column 
markers  throughout  the  night  and  then  spend  the  ensuing  daj^  getting 


C) 


■3i 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  93 

in  position  for  the  next  stage  of  the  Journey.  Officers  and  men  ahke 
were  footsore  and  weary  from  exposure  to  the  raw  weather  and  loss 
of  sleep  when  the  brigades  reached  their  designated  stations.  The 
Tenth  Brigade  was  in  the  lead. 

After  reconnaissances  of  the  sector  the  advance  elements  of 
Colonel  Malone's  brigade  began  relief  of  the  Ninetieth  Division  on 
the  night  of  the  10th.  Outpost  lines  remained  in  the  hands  of  the 
Ninetieth  Division.  l)ut  all  combat  and  rear  positions  passed  to  the 
Sixth  and  Eleventh  Infantry,  abreast  in  the  line.  The  rear  battalions 
of  the  Tenth  Brigade  were  in  Bois  de  Martincourt  and  Bois  de 
Couleur,  while  General  Castner's  Ninth  Brigade  was  in  la  Queue  de 
Themard,  northeast  of  Tremblecourt.  Divisional  and  artillery  bri- 
gade P.  C.'s  moved  to  St.  Jacques;  the  Tenth  Brigade  P.  C.  moved 
to  a  point  near  Metz  bridge,  while  the  Ninth  Brigade  P.  C.  was  set 
up  on  the  ]Mamey-St.  .Tac(iiies  road. 

The  German  ])()siti()iis  that  faced  the  troops  of  the  Fifth  Divi- 
sion were  excellently  situated  for  defense.  They  included  in  depth 
four  successive  heights,  tliree  of  whicli  were  defended  by  well  organ- 
ized systems  of  trenches.  Each  of  the  lieights  commanded  several 
valleys  where  enemy  reser\'es  were  stationed  and  from  which  counter- 
attacks might  normall\   \)v  planned  should  the  lieights  be  taken. 

The  German  outpost  trenches,  guarded  liy  the  usual  wide  zone 
of  barbed  wire,  were  on  the  open  forward  slope  about  four  hundred 
meters  above  Regnieville.  Nortli  of  the  first  lines  the  ground  rose 
for  half  a  kilometer  to  the  crest  S4<5.5,  just  east  of  the  road  to  Thiau- 
court.  East  of  Regnieville  tlie  German  lines  lay  on  the  top  of  the 
ridge,  behind  which  the  ground  sloped  back  to  Bois  de  la  Rappe. 

The  intermediate  or  First  Combat  Position  of  the  enemy  was 
here — a  single  trench  running  from  Hill  343.4.  on  the  Thiaucourt 
road,  across  the  top  of  Hill  34.3..).  northeast  to  Bois  de  la  Rappe, 
where  the  trencli  was  i-eplaced  l)y  only  occasional  bands  of  wire.  On 
the  southeast  edge  of  Bois  de  la  Rappe  the  trench  system  reappeared. 
Connection  from  the  outpost  trenches  to  the  combat  ])osition  and  the 
rear  was  l)y  means  of  deep  communication  trenches.  The  principal 
ones  were  Osterlaufgraben,  running  along  tlie  Thiaucourt  road,  and 
the  Boyau  des  Sacs,  parallel  to  Osterlaufgraben  and  three  lumdred 
meters  farther  west.  Boyau  des  Sacs  entered  Bois  du  Four,  whose 
eastern  corner  touched  the  Division  sector  west  of  tlie  Thiaucourt 
road,  a  kilometer  and  a  half  beyond  Regnieville. 

Behind  the  First  Combat  Position,  the  terrain,  on  the  left,  was 
open  and  sloped  down  for  a  kilometer  to  Bois  des  Saulx  and  Bois  des 
Grendes  Portions.     On  tlie  right  in  Bois  de  la  Rappe  were  en- 


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The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  95 

countered  the  Ravine  de  la  Fosse  and  the  valley  of  the  Trey,  which 
marked  the  eastern  boundary  of  the  Division's  field  of  action.  North 
of  Bois  de  la  Rappe  was  Bois  St.  Claude. 

These  three  woods  in  line  across  the  sector,  Bois  des  Saulx, 
Grandes  Portions  and  St.  Claude,  formed  the  Second  or  Real  Combat 
Position,  defending  the  second  height.  Hill  346.4,  south  and  south- 
east of  Vieville-en-Haj^e.  This  second  position  was  solidly  con- 
structed, with  two  lines  of  trenches  200  to  300  meters  apart,  concreted 
and  fitted  with  means  of  powerful  resistance.  The  woods  contained 
deep  dugouts,  built  six  meters  under  the  surface.  North  of  the 
woods  were  strong  artillery  positions.  Paths  led  to  the  rear  and 
supplies  were  brought  up  on  two  narrow  gauge  railroads,  Vieville- 
Grandes  Portions  and  Vieville-Rappe.  Behind  Hill  34G.4  was  the 
town  of  Vieville,  surrounded  by  wire  and  equipped  with  nmnerous 
machine  gun  nests  hidden  in  the  deserted  houses  and  in  position  to 
sweep  all  approaches  to  the  village.  A  stronghold  in  the  old  church 
tower  commanded  the  road  for  a  sweep  of  over  a  kilometer. 

The  third  heights.  Hill  361.4,  northeast  of  Vieville,  were  scarcely 
organized,  and  lay  in  advance  of  the  Third  Com])at  Position,  which 
ran  some  three  kilometers  north  of  Vieville.  A  kilometer  north  of 
the  town  was  Bois  Gerard,  with  its  deep  vallej^  and  pine-clad  slopes 
which  sheltered  a  German  hospital  and  rest  camp.  Bois  d'Heiche 
was  to  the  west  of  Bois  Gerard  and  formed  a  part  of  the  left  border 
of  the  Division  sector. 

The  Third  Combat  Position  on  our  immediate  front  consisted 
only  of  lines  of  wire  along  the  western  edge  of  Bois  de  Bonvaux,  a 
kilometer  north  of  Jaulny,  and  along  the  southern  outskirts  of  Bois 
de  Grand  Fontaine,  about  two  kilometers  north  of  Bois  Gerard. 
Here  the  Division  sector  widened  out  eastward  to  include  a  front  of 
four  kilometers,  taking  in  Bois  Hanido,  and  behind  it  Bois  de  Trou 
de  la  Haie.  This  third  position  was  considered  to  be  the  advance 
zone  of  the  Withdrawal  Position,  and  connected  with  the  strong  Hin- 
denburg  Line  by  paths  and  ravines  through  the  thick  woods. 

The  fourth  and  northernmost  heights  in  the  enemy's  system,  the 
hills  south  of  Villecey  and  the  stream  Rupt  de  INIad,  were  protected 
by  the  main  Withdrawal  Position,  the  Hindenburg  Line,  which 
passed  through  Rembercourt,  through  the  northern  horn  of  Bois  de 
Grand  Fontaine,  south  of  Ferme  de  la  Grange,  and  east  throuah 
Preny.  La  Souleuvre  Ferme.  on  the  boundary  between  the  Fifth 
and  Ninetieth  Division  sectors,  was  a  strong  outpost  of  the  line.  The 
strength  of  the  Hindenbm-g  Line,  which  had  been  constructed  by  that 
famous  General  of  the  Imperial  armies,  had  been  famed  throughout 


96  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

the  world  for  a  year.  It  was  thought  hy  its  makers  to  be  impreg- 
nable. In  the  Fifth  Division  sector  it  consisted  of  a  double  line  of 
trenches,  marked  out  and  reinforced  by  numerous  concrete  dugouts. 
A  double  line  of  zigzag  wire  protected  each  outlined  trench.  Pill- 
boxes and  other  concrete  strongholds  dominated  all  important  points. 
The  position  had  been  organized  in  dejjth  and  concrete  dugouts  ap- 
peared in  checkered  formation  as  far  as  a  kilometer  and  a  half  liehind 
the  trenches.  Fernie  de  la  Grange,  on  the  heights  south  of  Villecey, 
was  a  veritable  fortress. 

The  (xcrman  line  was  not  strongly  held,  as  the  zone  of  action  of 
the  Fifth  Division  was  slightly  overlapped  on  each  side  by  one  regi- 
ment of  (German  infantry,  tlie  332nd.  The  332nd,  with  the  419th 
and  the  2.)7th  to  the  west,  formed  the  Seventy-seventh  Reserve  Divi- 
sion. West  of  the  Seventy-seventh  Division  was  the  Tenth  Division, 
and  to  the  east  was  the  2.j.5th  Division  of  Landwehr  troops. 

Headquarters  of  the  Boche  regiment  o])posite  the  Fifth  Division 
were  located  on  the  north  edge  of  Bois  St.  Claude.  Two  battalions 
were  in  line,  with  a  third  in  reserve  near  La  Souleuvre  Ferme,  just 
east  of  Bois  Hanido.  Tlie  west  battalion  had  its  P.  C.  and  one  sup- 
jjort  c()mi)any  in  the  south  edge  of  Bois  du  Four.  The  other  support 
company  was  in  Bois  des  Saulx.  Two  companies  manned  the  First 
Combat  trenches,  with  Boyau  des  Sacs  as  a  dividing  line.  Most  of 
the  effectives,  therefore,  were  west  of  the  Division  sector.  The  east 
battalion's  P.  C.  was  imknown;  two  companies  in  support  were  in  the 
dugouts  in  the  deep  valley  of  the  Trey,  just  inside  the  sector  on  the 
east.  Two  companies  in  the  line  held  the  trenches  on  the  east  of  Hill 
34.5. .5  and  along  Bois  de  la  Rappe.  A  few  scattered  men,  generally 
with  machine  guns,  manned  the  outpost  lines.  Machine  guns  were 
known  to  be  well  distributed  over  the  sector,  covering  the  north  exit 
of  Regnieville  and  the  approaches  to  Bois  de  la  Rajjpe.  Heavy  ma- 
chine guns  were  located  on  the  reverse  slope  of  Hill  34.5. .5  and  in  Bois 
du  Foiu',  wliere  there  were  minenwerfer  as  well.  Batteries  of  77's, 
10;5's  and  1.50"s  were  emplaced  in  Bois  du  Four  and  Bois  des  Saulx. 

With  the  Xinetieth  on  its  right  and  the  Second  on  its  left,  the 
Fifth  Division  was  to  attack  as  a  part  of  the  First  Army  Corps.  The 
]>lan  of  attack  included  for  the  first  day  two  phases.  Following  artil- 
lery pi-eparation  and  ]n-eceded  by  a  rolling  barrage  and  heavy  tanks, 
the  assaulting  battalions  of  infantry  were  to  rush  the  outpost  and 
First  Combat  lines  and  captin-e  the  Intermediate  Objective,  the  en- 
emy's Second  or  Real  Combat  Position  in  Bois  des  Saulx,  Grandes 
Portions  and  St.  Claude.  Without  losing  the  impetus  of  the  original 
thrust,  the  second  line  battalions  should   pass  through  the  assault 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  91 

battalions  here  and  carry  the  fioht  on  for  three  kilometers  fin-ther  to 
the  northern  edge  of  Bois  Gerard  and  the  heights  northeast  of  Vie- 
ville.  There  ended  the  First  Phase.  Six  hours  were  allowed  for 
attaining  this  objective.  At  H  plus  six  hours  the  attack  was  to  be 
continued  to  the  First  Day  I.,ine  by  the  battalions  that  had  started 
the  fight  as  local  reserve.  From  the  First  Day  Line  strong  recon- 
naissance patrols  should  be  sent  out  to  drive  the  enemy  back  and  to 
hold  the  ground  up  to  his  line  of  withdrawal,  Rembercourt-La 
Souleuvre  Ferme. 

Colonel  IMalone's  brigade,  which  had  occupied  the  sector  on  the 
night  of  the  10th.  was  designated  as  the  attacking  troops.  General 
Castner's  brigade  formed  the  reserve.  The  formation  assumed  was 
line  or  regimental  columns,  one  battalion  of  each  regiment  in  the 
front  line.  In  occupying  the  sector  Colonel  Bennet,  Eleventh  In- 
fantry, on  the  right,  had  placed  INIajor  IMahin  with  the  first  battalion 
in  the  combat  trenches.  jNIajor  ^luncaster,  second  battalion,  in  sup- 
port and  IMajor  Barlow,  third  battalion,  in  reserve.  On  the  left 
Colonel  Hunt  had  disposed  of  the  Sixth  Infantry,  by  placing  Major 
Leonard's  third  battalion  in  the  combat  line.  Major  Huddleson's  first 
battalion  in  support  and  Major  Hodge's  second  battalion  in  reserve. 
The  reserve  brigade  had  similar  formation.  Colonel  Wise  on  the 
right  with  the  Sixty-first  and  Colonel  Hawkins  on  the  left  with  the 
Sixtieth.  In  the  Sixty-first  Infantry  the  battalions  were  formed  in 
column — second  (IMajor  Bankhcad),  first  (]Major  Henley),  third 
(Lieutenant  Colonel  INIcClure)  ;  the  Sixtieth  was  formed,  second 
(Major  Baldwin),  third  (Major  Davis),  first  (IVIajor  Palen). 

Companies  A  and  D  of  the  Sixtieth  Infantry  were  detailed  as 
combat  liaison  troops  with  the  Second  Division  on  the  left,  while  the 
Eleventh  Infantry  sent  out  two  more  platoons  of  its  Company  E  and 
a  machine  gun  platoon  to  connect  with  the  Ninetieth  Division  on  the 
right.  The  second  battalion  of  the  Twentieth  Field  Artillery  was 
designated  to  serve  under  direct  orders  of  Colonel  Malone.  Battery 
E  was  to  accompany  the  attacking  battalions  of  the  Eleventh,  and 
Battery  D  was  assigned  to  the  lead  battalion  of  the  Sixth.  Battery 
F  was  held  to  fire  on  sj^ecial  targets  pointed  out  by  the  assault  bri- 
gade. A  company  of  tweh'c  medium  tanks  (French)  had  been  as- 
signed the  Division  and  wej-e  to  precede  the  infantry,  to  break  down 
the  wire  and  help  overcome  local  resistance.  Two  companies  of  light 
tanks  (French)  were  to  follow  up  the  assault  battalions,  to  lielp  in 
mopping  up  and  to  provide  support  against  counterattacks.  Com- 
pany A  of  the  Seventh  Engineers  was  detailed  to  assist  the  tanks; 
Company  B's  platoons  were  split  up  among  the  assaulting  infantry 


,0 


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"v3 


^  I 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  99 

companies  to  help  open  up  the  wire  with  cutters  and  Bengalore  tor- 
pedoes; Conipanj'  C  was  to  proceed  with  the  accompanying  batteries, 
to  bridge  trenches  and  open  up  the  way  for  the  advance ;  Company  D 
was  assigned  tlie  work  of  opening  up  the  Regnieville-Thiaucourt 
highway  across  Xo  IVIan's  Land;  Company  F  had  a  shnilar  task  from 
Fey-en-Haye  through  Vieville  to  Jaulny;  Company  E  was  assigned 
maintenance  of  the  ^lartincourt-St.  Jacques  road.  Company  E  of 
the  First  Gas  Regiment,  ecpiipped  with  four-inch  Stokes  mortars, 
was  to  take  position  in  the  front  hue  and  provide  a  smoke  screen  for 
the  advancing  troops.  The  companies  of  the  Fifteenth  JNIachine  Gun 
BattaHon  were  attached  to  the  infantry  battahons;  Company  A  went 
to  the  third  battahon  of  the  Eleventh  Infantry,  B  to  the  third  bat- 
talion, Sixth;  C  to  the  first  battalion.  Eleventh,  and  D  to  the  second 
battalion,  Sixth.  The  Thirteenth  and  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun 
Battalions  formed  a  separate  group  under  Lieutenant  Colonel  Gil- 
bert M.  Allen,  Division  Machine  Gun  Officer,  and  took  positions  in 
the  support  trenches  in  Bois  dit  Jolival  and  Bois  de  la  Chambrotte 
for  barrage  fire.  To  the  Fifth  Division  were  also  added  the  Twelfth 
Aero  Squadron,  consisting  of  eighteen  planes,  and  Balloon  Company 
No.  2  for  reconnaissance  and  observation  and  to  assist  in  liaison. 

The  storm  broke  before  the  Boche  was  prejiared.  The  Germans 
had  foreseen  the  operation  and  had  decided  to  withdraw.  But  the 
attack  came  about  forty-eight  hours  before  it  was  expected.  In  fact 
their  orders  were  issued  for  withdrawal  on  the  day  before  the  opera- 
tion began,  and  the  American  barrage  and  assault  caught  the  enemy 
just  as  he  was  beginning  to  evacuate.  He  could  offer  no  strong- 
resistance.  The  American  concentration  had  been  accomplished  with 
successful  secrecy,  despite  the  enemy  avions  constantly  searching  the 
lines  and  the  frequent  shelling  of  all  the  roads  and  areas  in  rear  of  the 
front. 

At  2  p.  M.  of  the  11th  the  troops  of  the  Tenth  Brigade  began 
their  march  to  take  position  for  the  assault.  Major  Barlow's  and 
Major  Hodges'  battalions  moved  from  their  i-eserve  positions  to  the 
jumping-off  trenches.  The  sky  was  heavily  clouded  and  a  light  rain 
prevented  German  aviators  from  discovering  the  movements.  Ob- 
servers on  the  heights  behind  the  enemy  lines  were  blinded  by  the 
mist. 

Nightfall  found  the  assault  battalions  in  Bois  dit  Johval,  north 
of  the  St.  Dizier-Metz  highway.  Routes  to  the  jumping-off  trenches 
had  been  but  partially  reconnoitered,  and  the  night  was  pitch  dark 
and  rainy.  By  midnight,  however,  the  troops  had  reached  their  posts 
for  the  attack  and  were  crouched  in  the  mud  waiting  for  H  hour  of 


&5 


05 


^ 


The  St.  Mihid  Operation  101 

D  day  to  come.  The  message  of  Colonel  Malone  to  Division  Head- 
quarters, "The  fish  are  hatched,"  meant  that  the  front  line  of  the 
357th  Infantry  had  been  reheved.  The  Ninth  Brigade  moved  for- 
ward witli  a  regiment  on  either  side  of  the  St.  Jean-Jjt.  Jacques 
road — head  near  St.  Jacques,  rear  north  of  ]\Iartincourt. 

With  the  coming  of  darkness  the  roads,  that  had  jn-eserved  their 
normal  appearance  in  daytime,  were  overrun  with  traffic  again. 
Wagons  carrying  ammunition  to  the  infantry  and  machine  guns, 
trucks  with  artillery  shells  and  powder,  tanks  large  and  small,  med- 
ical carts,  the  last  batteries  of  artillery,  couriers  and  messengers  on 
horse  and  motorcycle,  crowded  the  few  narrow,  nmddy  roads.  The 
tanks  were  blocked  south  of  the  Metz  ])ridge  and  at  midnight  were 
still  struggling.  The  message  to  Heachjuarters  was  "Roosters  wad- 
dling." All  the  batteries  finally  reached  their  positions  in  time,  but 
grave  doubts  were  felt  as  to  the  sufficiency  of  the  supply  of  ammuni- 
tion for  the  barrage  and  boml)ardment.  One  hundred  truck  loads  of 
ammunition  were  stuck  in  the  jam  on  the  rear  road,  and  only  five 
had  arrived  at  midnight.  The  French  liaison  officer  with  the  Artil- 
lery Brigade  declared  that  the  operation  could  not  be  carried  out,  that 
the  drive  was  foredoomed  to  faihn-e.  Nevertheless,  the  Iieroic  effoi-ts 
of  the  Ammunition  Train,  the  Trench  jNlortar  Battery  and  the  artil- 
lery echelons  finally  provided  the  necessary  amount  of  high-explo- 
sive and  shrapnel,  although  it  l)ecame  necessary  to  thin  do^vn  the 
traveling  barrage  at  the  end  of  the  fire.  No  plan  for  artillery  prep- 
aration previous  to  H  hour  had  been  included  in  the  Field  Order. 
Only  a  tentative  scheme  had  been  worked  out.  At  7  p.  m.  of  Septem- 
ber 11th  orders  came  for  four-horn-  artillery  preparation  previous 
to  the  hour  of  attack,  and  the  discarded  plans  were  hastily  revived. 

Ill 

At  1  A.  :\i.  the  boml)ardment  began.  From  opposite  Verdiui  to 
St.  Mihiel  and  east  to  Pont-a-Mousson  there  roared  the  greatest  artil- 
lery fire  that  American  arms  had  ever  known.  lo5's,  220's  and  8-inch 
guns  of  the  Fifth  Division  sector  rained  steel  upon  every  known 
point  of  the  enemy's  lines.  Trenches  of  the  Boche  combat  position 
in  Bois  des  Saulx,  des  Grandes  Portions  and  St.  Claude  were  del- 
uged. The  zones  of  dugouts  in  Bois  du  Four  and  Valley  de  la  Trey 
were  swept  with  shell.  Battery  positions  were  bombarded  and  the 
routes  of  communication  to  the  rear,  past  Vieville,  even  to  La  Sou- 
leuvre  Ferme,  were  covered  with  interdiction  fire. 

The  roar  of  the  cannon  was  deafening  and  bursts  of  flame  lit  up 
the  sodden  sky.     At  first  the  Hvm  artillery  attempted  to  reply,  but 


102  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

by  1:55  A.  M.  their  last  gun  was  sikiit.  The  only  sounds  that  might 
lie  heard  from  the  dark  heights  behind  the  German  lines  were  the 
booms  of  bursting  shells.  Doughboys  waiting  in  the  trenches  were 
impatient  of  the  delay.  Already  all  except  the  forward  strands  of 
the  defensive  wire  in  front  of  their  jumiiing-off  trenches  were  cut  to 
speed  their  advance.  The  rain  soaked  everyone  to  the  skin.  Some 
men  even  changed  socks  and  underwear  from  their  clean  supj)ly  in 
their  heavy  packs. 

H  hour  was  5  a.  m.  At  4:30  the  machine  guns  all  oi^ened  up  a 
heavy  barrage  of  indirect  and  overhead  fire  on  the  points  in  the  Ger- 
man lines  whence  counterattacks  might  come.  Promptly  at  5  o'clock 
fifteen  75  batteries  began  their  rolling  barrage  along  the  whole  width 
of  the  sector.  High-explosive  rained  on  the  enemy  front  lines  and 
then,  by  fifty  meter  bounds,  went  forward  toward  the  intermediate 
positions  in  the  belt  of  Bois.  The  rate  of  advance  was  a  hundred 
meters  every  fom*  minutes,  three  shots  per  gun  per  minute. 

The  heavy  tanks  had  not  reached  their  positions.  They  were 
mired  in  the  ground  made  soft  by  many  shell-holes  and  constant  rain. 
The  artillery  had  not  cut  the  German  wire  because  reliance  had  been 
placed  in  the  tanks. 

Undaunted  by  the  unbroken  wire  ahead,  at  the  instant  that  the 
barrage  came  down  the  doughboys  of  Major  Barlow's  and  Major 
Hodges'  battalions  dashed  forward.  Three  companies  of  each  bat- 
talion, with  platoons  abreast,  were  in  the  front  line;  the  Fourth  com- 
panies were  in  support.  Four  thin  waves  of  mud-stained  men,', 
helmeted  and  under  full  pack,  bayoneted  rifle  in  hand,  swept  through 
the  lanes  in  their  own  barbed  wire.  It  was  not  quite  dawn.  The 
scattered  Bodies  in  their  lonely  outposts  and  isolated  machine  gun 
nests  must  have  quaked  as  the  avalanche  descended  upon  them. 
Rockets  went  up  in  frantic  calls  for  counter-barrages,  but  German 
artillery  was  wrecked  or  abandoned.  As  the  flexible  line  swept  over 
shell-torn  No  Man's  Land  the  smoke  screen  went  down,  adding  to 
the  opacity  of  the  rain-laden  atmosjjhere  and  blinding  the  enemy 
snipers  and  machine  gunners.  The  wire  held  the  men  up  but  an  in- 
stant. Wire  cutters  were  scarce,  l)ut  the  entanglements  were  old 
and  rusty,  in  only  fair  condition.  When  the  engineers'  wire-cutters 
could  not  do  the  work  fast  enough  for  the  rushing  doughboys,  eager 
hands  pulled  up  the  iron  supporting  stakes  and  the  bands  of  barbs 
were  trampled  under  foot.  It  was  dangerous  work,  but  no  one  hesi- 
tated. Men  filed  through  communication  trenches  when  they  came 
upon  them. 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  103 

On  the  left  the  advance  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  was  opposed  by 
fire  from  a  few  scattered  machine  gims  which  were  quickly  taken  I)}' 
Hanking.  The  right  of  the  Eleventh  was  held  up.  The  men  took 
shelter  in  shell-holes  while  Company  A  of  the  Fifteenth  Machine 
Gun  Battalion  mounted  guns  and  poured  a  rain  of  bullets  into  the 
opposing  nests.  The  waves  washed  over  the  front-line  trenches.  The 
left  of  the  Eleventh  was  held  up  by  machine  guns,  but  the  tactics  of 
the  Fifteenth  destroyed  the  opposition  in  short  order. 

The  front  lines  were  passed  by  5:45  a.  m.  The  men  advanced  so 
rapidly  that  they  jjressed  the  barrage.  Twice  they  overtook  it  and 
shorts  fell  among  them.  Machine  gminers  had  difficidty  in  keeping 
pace  with  the  fast-going  doughboys.  The  unwieldy  tanks  struggled 
to  catch  up,  but  floundered  in  the  mud  and  shell-torn  stretches  of  Xo 
Man's  Land.  At  6:15  a.  m.  the  tanks  were  just  entering  Regnieville. 
The  accompanying  batteries  of  the  Twentieth  Field  Artillerj'  were 
also  stuck  in  the  morass.  The  engiiieers  detailed  to  bridge  trenches 
and  repair  roads  were  too  few,  and  the  teams  could  not  drag  the  light 
75's  across  No  INIan's  Land  and  through  the  wire. 

With  the  first  waves  went  the  outpost  comjianies  of  the  Signal 
Battalion  and  the  medical  men.  The  signalmen  carried  wire  and  tele- 
jihones  to  connect  battalion  commanders  with  their  regimental  P.  C.'s. 
JNIuch  of  their  work  was  set  at  naught  when  the  tanks  cut  their  lines. 
The  medical  stafi^  carried  litters  and  first  aid  sujjplies  and  gave  imme- 
diate attention  to  oiu'  wounded.  The  Thirteenth  and  Fourteenth 
Machine  Gun  Battalions  ceased  their  barrage  and  moved  forward 
in  the  support  wave,  intending  to  take  up  new  positions  on  the  heights 
above  Regnieville.  But  the  sjjeed  of  the  assault  battalions  was  too 
great  for  them  and  their  services  were  not  needed. 

At  6:15  A.  M.  the  observers  at  the  Brigade  1*.  C.  could  dimly 
discern  tlu'ough  the  smoke  screens  a  large  group  of  men  bunched  to- 
gether and  coming  from  Regnieville.  It  was  the  first  jDrisoners. 
Resistance  was  not  stubborn,  jn-isoners  frequently  surrendering  with 
l)ut  little  fighting.  Sixteen  prisoners  arrived  at  the  Tenth  Brigade 
P.  C.  at  7:35  A.  m.,  and  from  then  on  the  stream  was  a  steady  one. 
Few  were  wounded.  Some  had  been  killed  by  the  bombardment, 
and  short  shrift  was  given  resisters. 

As  the  lines  passed  over  the  ridge  beyond  the  German  first  lines 
a  lone  rabbit  darted  out,  unharmed  by  the  tornado  of  war.  He  did 
not  go  far.  A  doughboy  of  the  second  wave  knocked  him  over,  and 
continued  forward,  bayoneted  rifle  in  one  hand,  rabbit  in  the  other. 
Remarks  of  his  comrades  did  not  disturb  the  soldier,  for  he  only 
replied,  "Well,  we  gotta  eat  sometime,  ain't  we?"     For  a  kilometer 


S 
p 

s 


•-si 


Si 

ft5 


The  iSt.  MiJiiel  Operation  105 

or  more  he  swung  the  fresh  ration  along,  till  the  line  approached  the 
woods  des  Saulx.  Enenw  machine  gmis  began  to  sputter  and  the 
waves  in  support  began  their  usual  tactics  of  flanking.  Rabbits  were 
suddenly  of  minor  importance.  The  Ninu-od  threw  down  his  cotton- 
tail and  ran  forward  to  hunt  the  Hun. 

The  woods  held  up  the  lines  a  bit,  but  the  rush  merely  paused. 
Several  machine  gun  nests  in  St.  Claude  were  reduced  with  dispatch. 
The  gunners  were  killed.  Everywhere  the  Bodies  were  stormed. 
Some  surrendered  gladly  with  the  familiar  "Kamerad."  Often  the 
men  on  the  heels  of  the  barrage  reached  the  German  dugouts  before 
the  occupants  had  time  to  come  out.  Colonel  Malone  reported  that 
at  6:15  a.  m.  the  Intermediate  Objective  had  apparently  been  taken. 
The  assault  battalions  stopped  to  consolidate  the  positions.  Boches 
were  called  forth  from  dugouts  and  hiding  places,  and  every  trench 
and  stretch  of  underbrush  was  mopped  up.  Even  the  German  lieu- 
tenant colonel  conmianding  the  332nd  Regiment  was  taken.  He  grew 
choleric  with  rage  when  he  had  to  walk  back  to  the  prisoners'  camp 
with  ordinary  privates. 

With  the  coming  of  dawn  the  sky  was  filled  with  Allied  air- 
planes and  in  the  rear  were  many  observation  balloons.  Desjjite  the 
clouds  and  rain  the  planes  swept  the  air,  pointing  the  way  for  the  in- 
fantry, keeping  the  location  of  the  front  lines  in  view  and  reconnoiter- 
ing  the  enemy's  movements.  St.  Mihiel  beheld  the  greatest  concen- 
tration of  air  forces  of  the  whole  war,  up  to  that  date. 

At  6:50  A.  M.  the  barrage,  which  had  settled  just  ahead  of  the 
Intermediate  Position,  thickened  and  once  more  began  its  forward 
movement.  The  support  battalions  of  Major  Muncaster  and  Major 
Leonard,  followed  by  the  reserve  battalions  of  Major  Mahin  and 
Major  Huddleston,  passed  through  the  lines  and  continued  on, 
straight  toward  Germany.  Packs  wei-e  discarded  as  the  fast  advanc- 
ing lines  swept  forward  from  Bois  des  Saulx  and  Grandes  Portions. 
Men  had  trouble  enough  with  the  sticky  mud  and  wet  bushes.  With 
a  trusty  rifle  in  hand  to  bag  a  Hun,  why  think  of  shelter  or  food! 
The  Springfield  was  dearly  cherished,  and  many  an  eager  private 
armed  with  the  Chauchat  automatic  left  it  to  pick  up  the  rifle  of  a 
wounded  comrade. 

The  Eleventh  Infantry  descended  on  Vieville,  protected  by  its 
belt  of  wire  and  strong  machine-gun  nests.  They  took  the  town  while 
the  barrage  was  leaving  it.  The  men  in  steel  gray  came  out  of  their 
cellars  and  deep  dugouts  to  find  the  olive-drab  waiting  to  receive 
them.  There  was  resistance  only  from  the  isolated  machine  gunners. 
The  main  forces  of  the  enemy  were  attempting  to  retire  to  the  With- 


106  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

drawal  Position.  So  pressed  were  they,  however,  that  the  retreat  was 
a  rout.  Of  tlie  battahons  of  the  332nd  tliat  had  been  in  hne  only  a 
major  and  a  hundred  men  reached  the  Hindenburg  Line.  For  the 
greater  jjart  of  the  day  of  the  12th  there  were  no  other  defenders  of 
the  sector. 

The  advance  swept  on  jjast  Vieville  and  througii  Bois  Gerard 
and  by  9:30  the  front  was  on  the  First  Phase  Objective — the  north- 
east corner  of  Bois  d'lleiche,  the  north  border  of  Bois  Gerard  and  a 
hne  to  the  southeast  toward  Foret  de  ^"enclieres.  The  Thirteenth  and 
Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battahons,  which  had  struggled  with  their 
heavy  Hotchkiss  guns,  took  up  strong  positions  against  possible 
counter-attack  on  a  line  approximately  northwest  and  southeast 
through  Vieville.  The  infantry  mopped  up  the  new  woods.  In  Bois 
Gerard  the  Sixth  and  Eleventh  came  upon  a  German  hospital,  with 
a  huge  Red  Cross  delineated  ujjon  an  open  plot  of  ground  with  red 
and  white  tiles  taken  from  the  roofs  of  French  cottages.  Evidently 
the  Hun  had  confidence  that  Allied  aviators  were  more  merciful 
with  their  bombs  than  were  his  own  men.  Further  up  the  valley  in 
the  woods  were  huts  and  dugouts  furnished  for  comfort.  Rustic  beer 
gardens  showed  that  here  the  Germans  had  a  recreation  camp.  The 
shelters  were  fitted  with  furniture  that  had  been  filched  from  French 
homes.  Even  the  glass  from  cottage  windows  had  been  taken  to 
furnish  the  dugouts.  Everywhere  there  was  lighting  by  electricity, 
even  in  the  dugouts  of  Bois  des  Saulx  and  Cirandes  Portions.  The 
power  came  from  Metz  and  wires  were  cut  as  the  Germans  fled. 
It  was  in  this  hos])ital  area  that  the  Fifth  Division  captured  its  only 
woman  jjrisoner,  a  Red  Cross  nurse.  W  omen's  garments  were  com- 
mon in  the  various  dugouts,  however.  All  but  one  had  escaped  before 
the  drive.  Certainly  the  warfare  in  the  St.  Mihiel  sector  had  been 
peaceful ! 

Meanwhile,  as  soon  as  the  infantry  had  departed  from  the  jump- 
ing-off  trenches,  the  Seventh  Engineers  had  begun  the  enormous  task 
of  clearing  up  and  building  roads  so  that  supplies  might  follow  up 
the  advance.  Tlie  road  through  Regnieville  was  so  obliterated  that 
its  course  was  completely  lost  in  some  places.  Companies  D  and  E 
of  the  Seventh  Engineers  began  a  new  road,  around  the  ruins  of 
Regnieville.  Lieutenant  Graham  with  a  battery  of  the  Nineteenth 
had  gotten  stuck  in  the  morass  and  had  already  roimded  up  some 
prisoners  and  pressed  them  into  the  service  of  helping  build  a  high- 
way. Traffic  forced  the  workers  and  lighter  vehicles  crowded  on 
ahead.  The  little  tanks  finally  plouglied  their  way  across  the  slough 
and  were  on  their  turtle-wav  aftei-  the  douyhbovs.    Bv  noon  tlie  med- 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  107 

ical  carts  and  mule-drawn  ambulances  had  crossed  the  lines.  The 
artillery  attenqjted  to  move  across  in  the  afternoon,  but  was  too  heavy 
on  the  soft  roads  and  could  not  get  past  the  old  front.  So  well  did 
our  engineers  work,  however,  that  they  were  the  first  in  the  Corps 
sector  to  open  a  road  across  Xo  ]\Ian's  I^and.  At  H  plus  12  (5  p.  m.) 
this  axial  road  through  Kegnieville  was  open  for  a  distance  of  two 
kilometers.  Tangled  masses  of  wire  had  been  removed,  mines  and 
traps  had  been  neutralized,  and  shell-holes  leveled.  Five  divisions 
sent  their  trains  over  the  route  because  thej-  had  not  completed  their 
ovm.  Connjany  F  was  working  on  the  lesser  road  on  the  east  of  the 
sector,  near  Fey-en-Haye,  up  which  the  rolling  kitchens  and  ration 
carts  made  their  way  in  the  afternoon. 

By  9:30  in  the  morning  the  battalions  in  Bois  des  Saulx,  des 
Grandes  Portions  and  St.  Claude  had  completed  the  consolidation  of 
their  positions.  Then  the  brigade  and  regimental  P.  C.'s  were  moved 
forward  and  established  in  Bois  des  Grandes  Portions.  To  keep  in 
close  supjjort  of  the  advancing  l)rigade,  two  battalions  of  the  Ninth 
Brigade  were  ordered  forward.  Major  Bankhead  (2nd  Battalion, 
61st)  and  Major  Baldwin  (2n(l  Battalion,  00th)  at  11  a.  m.  moved 
to  the  old  front  lines;  two  com])anies  of  each  l)attalion  took  position 
in  the  old  Boche  front  lines  antl  the  remaining  two  were  in  the  old 
French  front  lines.  The  triage  hospital  that  had  been  at  St.  Jean 
moved  to  Metz  Bridge.  Ambulance  dressing  stations  were  opened 
at  Regnieville,  Bois  des  Saulx  and  Vieville.  Another  dressing  sta- 
tion was  opened  in  Bois  Gerard  as  the  troops  carried  their  lines  past 
the  old  German  hospital,  whose  supplies  were  turned  to  good  ad- 
vantage. Each  dressing  station,  in  addition  to  caring  for  the 
wounded,  served  hot  coffee,  bread  and  corned  beef,  and  chocolate. 
Hundreds  of  tired,  famished  soldiers  were  invigorated  by  the  food 
thus  provided. 

Colonel  Malone  directed  tliat  the  advance  should  not  stop.  At 
9:30  A.  M.  messages  went  to  his  regimental  commanders.  To  Colonel 
Bennet  on  the  right,  where  the  Ai-my  Objective,  First  Day  Objective 
and  First  Phase  Objective  coincided,  the  instructions  were:  "Press 
advance  to  First  Phase  Line.  Rush  digging  with  great  vigor."  The 
word  to  Colonel  Hunt  on  the  left  was:  "B  battalion  will  not  halt  on 
the  First  Phase  Line  but  will  wheel  to  right  and  gain  Objective  of 
First  Day."  The  advance  was  pushed  on  accordingly.  The  Sixth 
Infantry  met  less  resistance  than  did  the  Eleventh.  On  the  right, 
the  troops  had  to  cross  open  fields  in  the  face  of  fire  from  heights 
where  machine  gunners  were  making  a  stand.  The  direction  of 
attack  was  changing  to  northeast,  in  accordance  with  Corps  plan. 


108  Histori/  of  the  Fifth  Division 

And  as  the  fighting  approached  the  main  AVithdrawal  Position  the 
resistance  of  the  enemy  grew  stiffer. 

The  First  Day  Ohjective  was  reached  and  the  troops  threw 
themselves  on  the  ground  to  dig  rifle  pits.  A  man  of  the  Sixth  In- 
fantry rushed  on,  paying  no  attention  to  tlie  fact  that  his  conu*ades 
had  halted. 

"Hev,  where  vou  goin'?"  called  a  sergeant.  "Stop  here  and  dig 
in!" 

"Dig  in  Hell!    Wliy?" 

"This  is  our  ohjective — where  we  stop." 

"My  ohjective's  Berlin,"  and  he  went  on. 

At  1:3.5  p.  M.  it  was  reported  that  all  ohjectives  were  attained. 
The  troops  were  on  the  Army  Ohjective  and  strong  patrols  were 
seeking  to  penetrate  the  approaches  to  the  Hindenhurg  Line.  Con- 
tact had  heen  lost  on  our  right;  the  Ninetieth  Division  had  encoun- 
tered stiff"  resistance  in  the  woods  and  ravines  in  its  sector  and  had  not 
kept  liaison  with  the  Eleventh  Infantry.  A  gap  extending  l)ack  to 
the  Intermediate  Ohjective  existed  on  om*  risfht  flank,  leaving  a  wide 
interval  of  perhaps  1.200  meters  hetween  Colonel  ISIalone's  right  and 
the  left  of  the  Ninetieth,  on  the  Army  Ohjective.  This  was  first  dis- 
covered hy  personal  reconnaissance  of  Colonel  Malone  and  suhse- 
quently  verified  hy  personal  reconnaissance  of  Captain  M.  Claude, 
French  liaison  officer,  and  Captain  van  de  Steeg,  Brigade  Adjutant. 

To  fill  this  dangerous  gaj)  on  the  right.  Colonel  Malone  ordered 
Major  Birmingham,  who  was  now  in  command  of  the  third  hattalion 
of  the  Eleventh,  to  face  his  forces  to  the  right,  beside  Major  Mun- 
caster's  hattalion  in  the  front  lines.  Major  Hodges'  hattalion  was 
moved  from  the  Bois  des  Saidx  to  positions  east  of  Vieville.  The 
machine  guns  of  the  Fourteenth  and  Company  D  of  the  Fifteenth 
were  put  in  place  to  cover  the  lines.  To  protect  the  rear  and  provide 
troops  for  possible  counterattack  the  reserve  battalions  of  the  Ninth 
Brigade  in  the  old  front-line  trenches  were  moved  up  to  Bois  de  la 
Rappe.  The  Thirteenth  INIachine  Gun  Battalion  was  relieved  and 
went  back  to  Bois  de  la  Rappe,  where  it  was  held  in  readiness  for 
future  emergencies. 

On  the  Division's  left,  the  outpost  patrols  of  the  Sixth  Infantry 
had  lost  contact  with  the  Marines.  The  advance  of  Major  Leonard's 
men  was  halted  and  troops  were  drawn  back  to  complete  the  liaison. 
Patrols  connected  with  the  Second  Division  on  the  Army  Objective. 
Major  Leonard's  battalion  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  had  patrolled  to 
the  outskirts  of  Rembercom't  where  prisoners  were  caj^tured,  but 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  109 

learning  that  the  Second  Division's  advance  element  was  near  Jaulny, 
it  was  necessary  to  readjust  his  left  flank  accordingly. 

Everywhere  the  first  day's  operation  of  the  American  Ai'my  had 
heen  successful.  The  Second  Division  had  taken  Thiaucourt,  and  the 
Eighty-ninth,  Forty-second  and  First  had  each  cut  a  deep  slice  out 
of  the  salient.  The  attack  of  the  Twenty-sixth  Division  on  the  west- 
ern face  of  the  Cotes  had  been  a  complete  surprise  to  the  Germans. 
For  the  13th  there  remained  onh^  a  few  kilometers  for  the  divisions  to 
drive  and  the  salient  would  be  no  more.  Every  division  had  taken 
many  prisoneivs  and  much  material.  The  success  of  the  Red  Diamond 
was  but  a  fair  examiile  of  that  which  attended  her  sister  divisions. 

Resistance  to  our  patrols  sent  out  toward  the  line  of  surveillance 
grew  stronger  in  the  aftei-noon.  Toward  evening  reinforcements 
began  reaching  the  enemy  lines  between  Rembercourt  and  la  Sou- 
leuvre  Ferme.  The  174. th  Regiment  (31st  Division)  was  thrown 
against  the  Sixth  Infantry  in  Rois  de  Ronvaux,  while  in  Rois  Hanido 
the  106th  Regiment  of  the  123rd  Division  opposed  the  Eleventh. 
The  remnants  of  the  Se\enty-seventh  Di\'ision,  which  had  held  the 
sector  at  the  beginning  of  the  attack,  were  relieved  by  the  123rd.  The 
Seventy-seventh  had  suffered  heavily  at  the  hands  of  the  Fifth;  all 
but  three  of  the  1,139  prisoners  taken  by  the  Tenth  Rrigade  in  the 
first  day's  fighting  were  from  that  division,  and  probably  two  hundred 
more  lay  dead  on  the  field.  We  had  captured,  in  addition,  practically 
all  their  artillery.  The  332nd  Regiment  had  been  even  worse  handled, 
for  from  its  twelve  companies  of  probably  fifty  men  each,  351  prison- 
ers were  taken.  During  the  larger  part  of  the  afternoon  no  other 
troops  were  defending  the  front.  The  demoralized  enemy  could  not 
stop  our  victorious  advance. 

Our  ovm  losses  for  that  first  day  were  heavy.  First  Lieutenant 
Frank  M.  Thompson  of  the  Fifteenth  Machine  Gun  Rattalion,  First 
Lieutenant  Julius  Niles  and  Second  Lieutenant  John  F.  Jutz  of  the 
Sixth  Infantry,  and  Second  Lieutenants  Robert  H.  Gamble,  John 
Edward  Pyle  and  Robert  Waldo  Tippett  of  the  Eleventh  were  killed. 
Eighteen  oflicers  were  wounded.  Enlisted  casualties  were  144  killed 
and  450  wounded. 

Despite  the  weakened  condition  of  the  enemy  the  outpost  patrols 
of  Major  Huddlesons'  battalion,  that  had  pushed  on  ahead  of  the 
objective  and  had  gained  contact  with  neither  the  Second  Division 
on  the  left  nor  the  Eleventh  Infantry  on  the  right,  spent  an  uneasy 
night,  fearful  of  being  cut  off  by  the  enemy  counterattack.  The  spirit 
of  the  enemy  had  risen  noticeably  on  the  arrival  of  the  units  of  the 


Gig 


!2      ^ 

S   s 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  111 

123rd  Division  and  artillery  fire  had  begun  and  was  steadily  growing 
stronger. 

Our  own  artillery  had  not  yet  gotten  into  action  again.  After 
finishing  their  barrages  about  11:30  a.  m.,  the  guns  had  limbered  up 
and  pulled  out  to  go  forward.  The  chaos  of  the  roads  made  advance 
impossible.  Horses  were  worn  out  and  night  found  the  light  regi- 
ments by  the  roadsides  just  north  of  Regnieville  and  the  heavy 
Twenty-first  was  still  in  No  Man's  Ijand.  Neither  had  the  tanks 
gotten  up.  A  German  prisoner  gave  information  that  he  had  worked 
on  mining  the  Thiaucourt  road  a  kilometer  beyond  Regnieville.  An 
engineer  located  the  mines  and  hiu'ried  away  to  get  men  to  destroy 
them.  But  ere  the  tanks  coidd  be  warned  a  large  tank  reached  the 
area  and  was  blown  to  pieces. 

IV 

The  organization  of  the  front  lines  continued  on  the  morning 
of  the  13th.  The  men  were  digging  rifle  pits  on  the  Army  Objective. 
The  gap  existing  on  the  right,  however,  had  made  it  necessary  to 
round  off  the  salient  thus  exposed.  Company  C  of  the  Fifteenth 
Machine  (iun  was  holding  a  large  part  of  that  open  ground  east  of 
Bols  Gerard.  Major  Mahin's  and  Major  Iluddleson's  battalions 
were  reaching  out  in  recoiniaissance  patrols  to  the  front  and  to  the 
flanks.  Strong  oj^position  was  encountered  before  the  parties  neared 
the  desired  surveillance  line. 

In  the  rear  areas  the  engineers'  constant  work  on  the  roads 
enabled  traffic  to  pass  over  into  the  coiKjuercd  territory.  The  tanks 
reached  Bois  d'Heiche.  By  early  afternoon  some  of  the  batteries 
of  the  Nineteenth  and  Twentieth  Field  Artillery  were  in  position  in 
and  in  front  of  Bois  des  Saulx.  Motor  ambulances  were  able  to  make 
their  way  to  the  front  and  gather  up  the  wounded.  Over  foin-  hun- 
dred soldiers  had  been  evacuated  by  the  medical  department  dm-ing 
the  first  twenty-four  hours  of  the  operation,  in  addition  to  half  a 
hundred  woimded  2)risoners. 

Outside  our  sector,  in  the  west,  the  advance  of  the  '2()th,  1st,  -i'ind 
and  89th  Divisions  had  gone  on  diu'ing  the  night  to  complete  the  army 
mission.  Shoi-tly  after  midnight  the  men  of  the  First  Division  from 
the  south  met  those  of  the  Twenty-sixth  from  the  west  in  the  neigh- 
borhood of  A'igneulles.  Hundreds  of  tardy  Bodies  were  cut  off  from 
their  homeland.  Our  forces  then  turned  to  the  northeast  and  drove 
toward  the  Hindenliurg  Line,  leaving  to  the  French  coming  up 
from  the  jjoint  of  the  old  salient  the  honor  of  taking  prisoners  the 


112  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

marooned  Germans.  The  army  mission  was  accomplished,  the  saHent 
was  reduced,  and  the  German  Hne  was  liroken.  Tlie  offensive  might 
even  have  been  pushed  on  successfully  in  the  direction  of  jNletz,  but 
the  First  American  Army  was  already  preparing  for  the  Meuse- 
Argonne  operation  and  the  St.  ]Mihiel  operation  had  to  be  terminated 
at  the  Hindenbm-g  I^ine. 

Shortly  after  one  o'clock  on  the  afternoon  of  the  13th  the  patrols 
and  observers  of  Major  Mahin's  battalion  advised  that  the  enemy  was 
preparing  a  counterattack.  The  two  Saxon  regiments  that  had  ar- 
rived in  the  sector  the  night  before  had  received  orders  to  retake  Bois 
Gerard.  Enemy  shelling  became  heavier,  coming  apparently  from 
light  and  medium  guns  in  Bois  Hanido  and  Bois  de  Bonvaux.  Troops 
were  massing  in  Bois  Hanido.  Calls  to  the  artillery  brought  light 
fire  from  batteries  of  the  Nineteenth  and  Twentieth  al)out  3:30  v.  m. 
None  of  the  Twenty-first  had  yet  reached  position.  Ammunition 
was  too  scarce  to  give  effective  support  in  l)reaking  up  a  German 
counterattack.  Some  of  the  cooks  and  detail  men  of  Battery  A  of 
the  Nineteenth  Field  Artillery  wheeled  a  captured  77  about,  and 
with  maximum  elevation  and  general  direction  toward  Germany  fired 
its  whole  supply  of  shells  at  the  enemy.  Perhaps  the  random  shooting 
gained  results,  for  next  day  the  piece  was  destroyed  ])y  a  direct  hit. 

The  two  battalions  of  the  Ninth  Brigade  that  had  moved  back 
that  morning  from  Bois  de  la  Rappe  to  the  old  trenches  were  ordered 
up  to  reinforce  the  lines.  The  Ninetieth  Division  had  not  yet  moved 
up  on  the  right,  so  that  Major  Hodges  was  still  holding  the  gap.  The 
tanks  in  Bois  d'Heiche  were  cautioned  to  be  ready.  The  Thirteenth 
Machine  Gun  Battalion  was  ordered  up  from  Bois  de  la  Rappe,  but 
its  motors  were  caught  in  the  jam  of  the  roads  and  the  guns  did  not 
get  up  till  next  morning. 

The  Boche  began  with  a  short.  \  iolent  barrage,  which  inflicted 
severe  casualties  on  the  Eleventh  and  the  machine  gun  company  in 
their  positions  on  the  open  slope  east  of  Bois  Gerard.  From  Bois 
Hanido  and  Bois  de  Bonvaux  the  enemy  infantry  about  4:.50  p.  m. 
advanced  toward  Bois  Gerard.  Heavy  machine  gun  and  rifle  fire 
from  the  edges  of  the  woods  protected  the  attacking  parties.  Aside 
from  minor  attempts  at  infiltration,  with  considerable  enemy  shelling 
on  their  forward  posts  the  Sixth  Infantry  received  little  of  the  force 
of  the  attack.  Bois  de  Gerard  was  guarded  by  the  Eleventh,  who 
under  the  brunt  of  the  assault,  punished  by  the  heavy  artillery  fire, 
drew  back  slightly.  A  strong  flank  attack  came  from  the  east  where 
the  Boche  had  brought  up  heavy  machine  guns  into  the  Foret  de 
Vencheres  and  swe2:)t  the  open  lines  defended  by  Company  C  of  the 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  113 

Fifteenth  ^lachine  Gun  Battalion.  That  company  bravely  stood  its 
ground,  returning  the  fire.  Lieutenant  Frederick  V.  Burgess,  al- 
though wounded,  went  from  post  to  post  supervising  the  fire  of  his 
ten  guns  that  poured  streams  of  lead  into  the  hidden  enemy.  The 
situation  seemed  grave.  The  tanks  were  ordered  to  Vieville  at  7:45 
p.  M.  under  escort  of  two  of  Major  Birmingham's  platoons.  Com- 
panies G  and  H  of  the  Sixth  and  a  platoon  of  machine  guns  were  dis- 
patched by  Major  Hodges  from  the  flank  position  to  support  the 
Eleventh. 

At  8  o'clock  the  enemy  had  penetrated  slightly  the  northeast 
corner  of  Bois  Gerard.  But  here  the  attack  was  overcome.  Infiltra- 
tion was  stopped  and  the  reinforcements  enabled  the  Fleventh  to 
cover  the  invaders  with  superior  fire.  Our  steady  machine  gun  fire 
at  last  silenced  the  enemy  in  Foret  de  Vencheres.  The  Boches  with- 
drew, leaving  five  men  from  three  different  Saxon  regiments  prisoners 
in  our  hands  and  a  dozen  or  more  dead  in  our  front  line  trench.  The 
number  of  dead  and  wounded  in  tlie  Bois  de  Bonvaux  and  to  the  north 
and  east  thereof  could  not  be  determined.  By  10  o'clock  the  attack 
was  completely  rejmlsed  and  the  Germans  had  all  withdrawn  by  their 
routes  of  approach  in  Hanido  and  Bonvaux.  The  tanks  arrived 
about  11  o'clock,  too  late  to  participate  in  the  fight.  ISIidnight  saw 
the  front  almost  quiet  again  with  only  an  occasional  exchange  of  shots. 
All  our  ol)jectives  were  firmly  held.  The  day  had  brought  our  regi- 
ments tAvo  hundred  casualties.  Second  Ijieutenants  Robert  A.  Davis 
and  Harry  C.  Horton  of  the  Eleventh  Infantry  had  lost  their  lives. 

Orders  had  been  received  from  the  Corps  on  the  afternoon  of 
the  13th  to  push  out  strong  patrols  to  the  Hindenburg  Line  in  con- 
junction with  the  Second  and  Ninetieth  Divisions.  The  counter- 
attack of  the  enemy  had  prevented  action  by  Colonel  Malone,  and  the 
Ninetieth  had  not  yet  come  up.  The  Second  had  succeeded  in  estab- 
lishing its  outpost  line  witli  its  ri<>ht  at  Rembercourt.  The  presence 
of  three  regiments  ojjposite  the  Division  indicated  that  considerable 
opposition  might  be  expected  against  patrols  so  close  to  the  Hinden- 
burg Line.  The  Tenth  Brigade  attack  was  prepared  for  1  p.  m. 
and  artillery  support  requested,  with  simultaneous  action  by  the  ad- 
joining brigades.  The  hour  of  attack  was  delayed.  Then  came  word 
that  the  1.55's  could  not  fire.  Only  the  first  battalion  had  gotten  into 
position  in  rear  of  Bois  des  Saulx. 

Preceded  by  a  light  barrage  from  the  7.5's.  INIajor  Mahin  and 
Major  Leonard  launched  their  attack  at  5  o'clock.  The  advance  of 
the  patrols  immediately  called  forth  fire  from  enemy  rifles  and  ma- 
chine gims,  for  the  barrage  was  too  light  to  be  effective.     Enemy 


114  History  of  the  Fifth  Dividon 

artillery,  both  heavy  and  light,  opened  up  and  began  to  play  on  the 
trenches  and  the  advancing  waves.  First  Lieutenant  V^ories  P. 
Erown  of  the  Sixth  was  killed.  The  troops  advanced  steadily  in  spite 
of  the  ojjposition.  On  the  left  Major  Leonard  found  easier  going 
and  swept  the  ravine  in  the  west  of  Bois  de  Bonvaux.  By  8  p.  m. 
outposts  had  been  established  north  of  Bonvaux.  Contact  was  gained 
with  the  Marines  at  Renibercourt.  Further  advance  was  suspended, 
however,  because  the  Eleventh  had  not  kept  pace  with  the  Sixth. 

The  enemy's  strong  positions  in  front  and  on  the  right  of  Major 
Mahin  made  it  necessary  for  the  Eleventh  to  fight  for  every  foot  of 
ground.  Heavy  artillery  fire  punished  his  troops  in  the  open  and 
small-arms  in  the  edges  of  Hanido  and  Bonvaux  held  the  lines  up. 
Three  companies  were  rushed  to  reinforce  the  battalion,  and  the  artil- 
lery, which  was  all  in  position  at  last,  was  directed  on  Bois  de  Hanido. 
The  Boche  attacked  at  7:30  p.  M.  and  the  Eleventh  was  forced  to 
retire  from  the  line  it  had  reached  about  three  hundred  meters  north 
of  Bois  Gerard.  At  the  end  of  an  hour,  however,  the  battalion  was 
reorganized  and  the  enemy  checked.  Major  Bankhead  arrived  with 
a  support  battalion. 

By  midnight  the  patrols  were  in  the  neighborhood  of  the  required 
outpost  line.  At  1:15  a.  m.  Captain  Wood  was  established  at  La 
Souleuvre  Ferme.  The  3.57th  Infantry  of  the  Ninetieth  Division  on 
the  right  had  slow  going  and  had  come  up  only  to  within  700  meters 
of  Major  Mahin's  forces.  Major  Mahin  went  on  forward  to  clean 
up  Bois  de  Trou  de  la  Haie.  His  message  to  Colonel  Payne  of  the 
Twentieth  Field  Artillery,  who  was  keeping  up  a  light  bombard- 
ment of  the  enemy  lines,  was:  "Be  careful  with  our  fire.  Our  troops 
on  way  to  Berlin.  Hard  to  get  exact  position,  but  we  have  infantry 
in  Bois  de  Trou  de  la  Haie.  Have  taken  Souleuvre  Ferme,  have 
some  men  in  Bois  de  Bonvaux.  No  liaison  of  any  strength  with  3.57th 
on  I'ight.  They  don't  seem  to  advance  as  fast.  At  all  events  keep 
fire  well  in  advance  of  points  mentioned." 

The  work  of  establishing  the  outposts  continued  through  the  re- 
mainder of  the  night,  with  the  enemy  sending  over  considera])le  mus- 
tard gas.  Major  I^eonard  on  the  left  had  swung  back  his  right  flank 
under  orders  from  the  lirigade  commander,  in  an  eff'ort  to  connect 
up  with  the  Eleventh  Infantry:  but  in  the  darkness  and  the  woods 
liaison  was  not  gained  until  daylight.  Major  Mahin,  having  lost 
contact  with  Major  Leonard  and  meeting  very  strong  resistance  at 
La  Soideuvre  Ferme,  witlidrew  some  three  hundred  meters  in  rear 
of  the  farm  and  there  establislied  himself  on  a  line  in  liaison  with 
elements  of  the  Ninetieth  Division.     When  daylight  came  the  right 


The  St.  Mihkl  Operation  115 

flank  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  was  located  m  Bois  de  Bonvaux,  and 
joined  the  3.57th  Infantry  about  half  a  kilometer  southwest  of  La 
Souleuvre  Fernie.  The  positions  were  strengthened  and  held.  The 
brigade  had  suffered  over  three  hundred  casualties  in  the  action,  but 
had  taken  about  '200  prisoners  and  material.  ^Ve  were  begiiuiing  to 
suffer  the  heavy  artillery  reaction,  which  follows  upon  the  termination 
of  every  attack  while  troops  are  still  in  the  open  and  cannot  be 
thoroughly  protected  by  trenches  and  dugouts. 

The  rainy  weather  had  come  to  an  end  and  the  sun  shone  brightly 
on  the  15th.  The  tanks  were  relieved  from  fm-ther  duty  with  the 
Division.  They  had  failed  to  be  of  assistance  in  any  operations,  but 
had  continually  broken  lines  of  communication  and  hindered  move- 
ments on  the  roads.  Enemy  airmen  were  becoming  bolder  and  they 
now  ventured  over  our  lines  frequently.  A  plane  was  brought  down 
near  Vieville  and  another  near  Regnieville.  One  daring  aviator 
camouflaged  as  an  Allied  flyer  made  his  way  far  behind  our  lines 
and  set  fire  to  two  observation  balloons.  He  had  almost  made  good 
his  escape  when  an  Allied  combat  plane  brought  him  down  on  the 
edge  of  German  territory.  The  digging-in  was  kept  up  on  the  front- 
line positions  under  intermittent  shelling  by  the  Boche.  No  attacks 
on  either  side  were  attempted. 

In  the  afternoon  the  troops  of  the  Eleventh  received  a  young 
Frenchwoman  who  escaped  from  La  Souleuvre  Ferme.  She  had 
lived  there  throughout  the  war  with  her  father  and  brother,  and  gave 
the  Intelligence  Section  valuable  information  concei-ning  the  Ger- 
man troops,  supplies  and  positions.  She  described  the  Hindenburg 
Line  as  being  "first  two  bands  of  wire,  then  a  string  of  many  dug- 
outs; next  three  bands  of  wire  and  more  dugouts,  placed  checkerwise 
and  about  a  hundred  meters  apart,  built  low  and  camouflaged," — 
evidently  pillboxes. 

Orders  were  issued  for  the  relief  of  the  Sixth  and  Eleventh  by 
the  Ninth  Brigade  on  the  night  of  the  lo-16th.  At  7  o'clock  Major 
Bankhead  (11/61)  and  Major  Baldwin  (11/60)  advanced  from  their 
support  positions  in  rear  of  Bois  Gerard  to  take  over  the  outpost 
lines  of  Major  Mahin's  (I/ll)  and  Major  Leonard's  (III/6)  bat- 
talions. The  Army  Objective  Line,  or  main  line  of  resistance,  through 
Bois  Gerard  and  Hill  361.4,  was  taken  by  Major  Henley  (1/61)  on 
the  right.  Lieutenant  Colonel  McClure  (III/61)  in  the  center,  and 
Major  Davis  (III'60)  on  the  left.  Major  Palen  took  over  the  In- 
termediate Position  with  the  first  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth.  The 
troops  of  the  Tenth  Brigade  moved  back  to  the  old  positions  north 
of  the  Metz  highway.     General  Castner  and  Colonel  Malone  ex- 


116  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

changed  P.  C.'s  and  at  8  a.  m.  of  September  16th  conunand  passed  to 
General  Castner,  conunanding  tlie  >;  inth  Brigade. 

In  order  to  organize  the  new  positions  thoroughly,  the  relieving 
battalions  carried  to  the  Army  Objective  Line  the  necessary  tools, 
wire  and  stakes  for  entrenching  and  wiring-in.  Colonel  Adams  of  the 
Seventh  Engineers  had  prepared  plans  for  the  construction  of  a  posi- 
tion of  resistance  along  the  Army  Objective  Line  and  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Panics  of  the  Engineers  supervised  the  work  of  staking  out 
the  lines  and  distributing  the  labor.  Permanent  organization  was 
begun,  and  when  the  Division's  relief  came  next  night  two-foot 
trenches  had  been  constructed  and  the  whole  front  had  been  solidly 
wired  by  the  Engineers.  Captain  Walter  S.  Keller,  Seventh  En- 
gineers, was  killed  by  shell-fire  on  the  morning  of  the  17th  while 
returning  from  work  on  the  new  positions. 

The  outpost  battalions  of  the  Sixty-first  and  Sixtieth  had  orders 
to  establish  their  patrols  on  the  surveillance  line,  up  to  La  Souleuvre 
Ferme — Rembercourt.  Major  Baldwin  (11/60)  had  relieved  Major 
Leonard  (III  6)  on  the  left  on  the  south  edge  of  Bois  de  Bonvaux 
about  9:00  p.  m.  The  enemy  was  harassing  the  lines  with  a  light 
artillery  fire.  Bright  moonlight  and  machine  gun  nests  a  couple 
of  hundred  meters  ahead  prevented  Major  Baldwin  from  making 
the  ordered  disposition  of  his  troops.  Contact  patrols  found  neither 
the  Marines  on  the  left  nor  the  Sixty-fii-st  on  the  right. 

On  the  east  half  of  the  sector  Major  Bankhead's  (11-61)  troops 
went  forward  with  instructions  to  occupy  the  heights  of  Bois  de 
Grand  Fontaine.  Companies  G  and  H  on  the  left  advanced  with- 
out finding  any  signs  of  the  enemy  and  at  7:00  a.  m.  of  the  16th  had 
ahnost  reached  the  crest  of  the  ridge  in  Grand  Fontaine  before  they 
were  discovered.  Seven  machine  guns  w^ere  cajjtured  and  their 
crews  killed.  Others  were  routed  and  the  height  was  won.  Com- 
panies E  and  F,  striking  in  the  direction  of  I^a  Souleuvre  Ferme,  met 
the  usual  resistance,  and  took  up  positions  on  Hill  361.4.  Steady 
enfilade  fire  from  Company  D  of  the  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Bat- 
talion broke  the  resistance.  In  the  afternoon  the  right  again  at- 
tempted to  advance  and  pushed  its  way  up  to  the  desired  lines,  only 
to  be  forced  to  retire  in  the  evening  when  the  valley  was  drenched 
with  gas. 

Major  Baldwin  undertook  to  place  his  patrols  in  the  left  half  of 
the  sector  on  the  desired  line  of  surveillance.  All  day  long  the 
troops  had  stood  up  under  harassing  fire  of  77's  and  105's,  inter- 
spersed with  gas.  The  Germans  had  had  sufficient  time  to  concen- 
trate their  artillery  and  were  subjecting  our  lines  to  a  severe  and 


The  St.  Mihicl  Operation  117 

continued  bombardment.  At  4  o'clock  they  put  over  a  lialf-hoiir's  bar- 
rage. At  6:20  V.  M.,  however,  in  spite  of  another  enemy  bombard- 
ment, the  battahon  advanced.  The  troops  went  forward  in  good 
order  and  encomitered  little  opposition  from  German  infantry.  The 
line  of  surveillance  was  reached  and  the  men  dug  in.  Captain  Lee  S. 
Eads  of  the  Sixtieth  had  received  wounds  which  caused  his  death. 
Liaison  patrols  found  ojiposition  from  machine  guns,  but  the  enemy 
was  speedily  dispatched.  The  tactics  of  one  gun  crew  were  described 
tlius: 

"M.  G.  fire  until  close  approach  of  our  infantry. 

Threw  grenades  when  our  troops  advanced  to  30  yards. 

Called  "Kamerad"  at  20  yards. 

Attached  to  A.  E.  F.  for  rations  at  0  vards." 


The  Seventy-eighth  Division,  wliich  had  formed  part  of  the 
First  Corps  reserve  in  the  St.  jNIihiel  Operation,  took  over  the  sector 
of  the  Fifth  Division  on  the  night  of  the  KM  7th.  Relief  of  the  Ninth 
Brigade  was  begun  at  7  p.  m.  and  by  morning  the  companies  of  the 
311th  and  312th  Infantry  were  established  in  their  jjositions  clear  up 
to  the  surveillance  line,  Rembercourt — La  Souleuvre  Ferme. 

The  Tenth  Brigade  had  already  started  on  its  march  to  the  vicin- 
ity of  Tremblecourt.  After  its  relief  General  Castner's  brigade 
moved  back  to  Manoncourt  and  the  region  of  Dom-evre-en-Haye. 
The  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  and  Seventh  Engineers  remained 
in  the  sector.  On  the  IGth  the  batteries  of  the  .)9th  C.  A.  C,  219th 
F.  A.  and  182nd  F.  A.  had  been  relieved  from  iluty  with  the  divisional 
artillerj'.  On  the  night  of  the  17-18th  the  Fifth  Brigade  took  over 
additionally  the  sector  of  the  Second  Ai'tillery  Brigade,  inasmuch  as 
the  Seventh-eighth  Division  had  also  relieved  the  Second  Division. 
The  operation  was  over,  the  sector  was  to  become  once  more  a  quiet 
one,  and  the  lines  were  to  be  held  by  the  normal  inactive-sector  number 
of  troops.  The  Engineers  policed  the  entire  area,  burying  the  dead, 
salvaging  equipment  and  property,  collecting  and  classifying  cap- 
tured material. 

The  spoils  mounted  high.  Twenty-five  77-mm.  guns,  four  105- 
mm.  guns,  thirteen  1.50-mm.  guns,  seven  anti-tank  guns,  one  anti- 
aircraft battery,  thirty  trench  mortars,  125  machine  guns,  550  rifles, 
over  100,000  rounds  of  artillery  and  trench  mortar  amnumition,  65 
horses,  thirty  flat  cars  and  several  miles  of  60  cm.  railroad  equipment, 
one  complete  field  hospital,   twenty  wagons,   thousands  of  dollars' 


118  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

worth  of  signal,  engineei-  and  medical  property,  many  maps  and  secret 
docimients,  and  innmnerable  miscellaneous  articles  were  listed  in  the 
captures  of  the  Fifth  Division. 

Heavy  losses  had  been  inflicted  on  the  enemy  personnel.  Ger- 
mans killed  in  the  Division  sector  were  estimated  at  three  hundred. 
Thirty-two  officers,  1,"210  enlisted  men  and  one  woman  were  taken 
prisoner.  There  was  no  possible  estimate  of  the  enemy  wounded. 
Sixty-one  wounded  prisoners  had  received  medical  attention  at  the 
evacuation  hospital.  The  Seventh-seventh  Reserve  Division  that  had 
opposed  the  Fifth  Division  at  the  outset  had  been  almost  wiped  out, 
and  the  123rd  Saxon  Division  that  had  come  to  the  rescue  had  suf- 
fered so  severely  that  the  troops  had  refused  to  make  fiu-ther  counter- 
attacks. 

Our  own  casualties  numbered  1,612.  Thirteen  officers  were 
killed,  forty-four  wounded  and  eleven  gassed.  Among  the  enlisted 
men  30.)  were  killed,  1,123  wounded  and  116  gassed.  Only  two  were 
known  to  be  captured.  Most  of  the  casualties  were  suffered  by  the 
Tenth  Brigade,  which  had  conducted  the  assault,  sustained  the 
counterattack  and  occupied  the  sector  fom-  of  the  five  days  of  the 
operation.  However,  on  account  of  the  increased  severity  of  the  Ger- 
man artillery  fire  on  the  16th,  the  losses  of  the  Ninth  Brigade  were 
very  heavy  for  the  time  engaged. 

The  Red  Diamond  Division  had  met  its  first  real  test  and  had 
succeeded,  even  reaching  its  objectives  before  adjoining  divisions.  To 
the  Commanding  General,  Major  General  Ligget  of  the  First  Corps 
had  telegraphed  after  the  first  day's  victory:  "Congratulate  sincerely 
the  Fifth  Division  on  its  splendid  achievement  today  and  desire  to 
express  my  pride  and  gratification  in  having  sucli  a  splendid  unit 
under  my  command." 

In  publishing  this  commendation  to  his  command  in  General 
Orders,  General  McMahon  said:  "The  Division  Commander  also  de- 
sires to  exjiress  his  deep  ajjpreciation  of  the  splendid  spirit  which 
has  animated  the  entire  Division  during  the  recent  operations.  Only 
a  well  discijjlined  command,  inspired  by  excellent  morale,  could  have 
under<>one  so  cheerfullv  the  severe  conditions  of  service  and  weather 
and  have  carried  out  with  such  splendid  spirit  in  battle  the  orders  of 
the  Corps  Commander. 

"It  is  to  be  distinctly  understood  that  this  expression  of  appre- 
ciation is  intended  not  only  for  the  combatant  troops  of  the  Division, 
but  also  for  those  whose  untiring  efforts  under  trying  conditions  of 
traffic  and  weather  made  ])ossible  the  forwarding  of  supplies  and  the 
evacuation  and  care  of  the  wounded." 


T}ie  St.  Miliiel  Operation  119 

For  acts  of  special  bravery  and  gallantry  five  officers  and  six- 
teen enlisted  men  were  awarded  the  Distinguished  Service  Cross. 
Fifteen  officers  and  a  hinidred  enlisted  men  were  cited  in  Division 
General  Orders.  The  Fifth  Division  had  won  a  place  in  the  A.  E.  F. 
Honor  Roll  and  shortly  after  the  operation  the  members  began  wear- 
ing the  shoulder  insignia  of  the  Red  Diamond.  Colonel  JNIalone, 
leader  of  the  victorious  Tenth  ]?rigade,  was  made  a  Brigadier 
General. 

From  September  17th  to  27th  the  Division  remained  in  the  rear 
of  its  old  sector,  southeast  of  Domevre.  Two  days  were  given  the 
men  for  rest.  New  clothing  and  equipment  were  issued  and  the 
troops  cleaned  up  after  the  week's  hard  work  in  the  mud  and  rain. 
Many  recruits  were  received  to  replace  men  lost  in  the  operation. 
Inspections  were  held  and  ti'aining  schedules  were  started  to  increase 
discipline  and  prepare  the  Division  for  another  trip  to  the  front. 
Special  attention  was  given  to  correcting  the  mistakes  that  had  been 
made  in  the  drive.  Problems  in  going  through  woods,  and  liaison, 
with  close  order  drill  and  wearing-  of  gas  masks  characterized  the 
instruction. 

The  Ammunition  Train  was  kept  busy  hauling  salvage  and  filling 
up  all  combat  units  with  the  required  amount  of  ammunition.  The 
Mobile  Ordnance  Repair  Shop  was  busy  overhauling  guns  of  the 
Artillery  Brigade  that  had  been  put  out  of  action  by  rough  travel 
or  enemy  hits  in  the  drive.  The  ]Mol)ile  Veterinarj'  Section  had  its 
hands  full  receiving  and  taking  care  of  sick  and  disabled  horses. 
Practically  all  the  artillery  horses  and  many  of  the  animals  of  other 
units  had  been  worn  out  by  the  rigors  of  the  operation.  The  veteri- 
narians had  as  many  as  two  hundred  horses  on  their  sick  line  and 
made  as  many  as  a  himdred  evacuations  in  a  day. 

The  Seventh  Engineers  remained  behind  with  the  Seventy- 
eighth  Division,  laid  out  the  defensive  positions  on  the  former  front 
of  the  Second  Division,  and  assisted  the  Engineer  Regiment  of  the 
Seventy-eighth  Division  in  continuance  of  the  work  of  organizing  the 
sector  until  the  24.th,  when  they  marched  back  to  rest  billets  at 
Rosieres-en-Haye.  The  following  night,  however,  they  were  re- 
turned to  the  JNIetz  l)ridge-Regnieville-Limey  area  for  road  work 
under  Corps  orders.  On  the  '28tb  they  were  again  relieved  and 
marched  back  to  Cornieville  to  rejoin  the  Division.  Company  A, 
Seventh  Engineers,  which  had  been  detached  from  the  regiment  on 
the  24th,  was  at  Boucq  building  new  quarters  for  Fouith  Corps 
Headquarters. 


120  Historij  of  the  Fifth  Division 

The  Eleventh  Infantry,  with  attached  companies  of  the  Fifteenth 
Machine  Gun  Battahon,  was  sent  from  Tremhleeourt  to  Dieulouard 
on  the  Moselle  and  placed  at  the  disposition  of  the  French  Sixty- 
ninth  Division  in  the  Pont-a-JNlouson  sector  in  case  of  enemy  attack. 
While  here  they  were  constantly  under  enemy  shell-fire,  as  the  Eoche 
artillery  was  searching  for  the  position  of  a  huge  French  railroad 
gun,  one  of  the  largest  of  the  entire  western  front.  On  September 
29th,  while  the  men  were  at  noon  mess,  a  couple  of  direct  hits  were 
registered  upon  the  kitchens  of  the  first  battalion  of  the  Eleventh 
and  Company  A  of  the  Fifteenth.  First  Lieutenant  James  O.  New- 
pher  was  mortally  wounded.  Thirteen  men  were  killed  and  three 
officers  and  sixty  men  were  wounded.  Other  shells  killed  several 
horses.  The  regiment  moved  to  Manoncourt  during  the  night  of 
September  29-30th. 

While  in  the  Domevre  ai'ea  the  Fifth  Division  was  a  part  of  the 
reserve  of  the  Fourth  Corps,  behind  the  Seventy-eighth  and  Ninetieth 
Divisions.  On  the  night  of  September  2.5th  the  69th  French  and  90th, 
78th,  89th  and  42nd  Divisions  made  a  series  of  concerted  raids  on 
the  German  lines  to  divert  the  attention  of  the  enemy  and  assist  in 
the  success  of  the  new  American  drive  that  was  being  launched  north 
of  Verdun,  between  the  Meuse  and  the  Argonne.  For  the  action 
the  Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  was  attached  to  the  Nine- 
tieth Division.  It  marched  to  a  position  in  reserve  with  the  343rd 
Machine  Gun  Battalion,  but  did  not  go  into  action.  The  Thirteenth 
rejoined  the  Division  on  September  29th. 

Companies  A  and  C  of  the  Sixtieth  Infantry,  with  Company 
C  of  the  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  and  two  sections  of 
Stokes  mortars,  were  attached  to  the  Sixty-ninth  French  Division 
for  the  raid.  The  force  under  command  of  Major  Palen  ojjerated 
with  a  company  of  Senegalese  in  taking  Bois  de  Frehaut,  east  of  the 
Moselle.  The  mission  was  carried  out  and  prisoners  taken.  The 
troops  were  subjected  to  severe  high-explosive  and  gas  shelling  and 
machine  gun  fire,  and  had  as  casualties  fom*  officers  wounded;  eleven 
enlisted  men  killed,  twenty-eight  wounded,  nine  gassed  and  twelve 
missing. 

On  September  27-28th  the  Division  moved  by  night,  marching 
back  to  the  Pagny-sur-lVIeuse  area,  west  of  Toul.  All  the  detached 
units  joined,  except  the  Artillery  Brigade  and  its  sections  of  the  Am- 
munition Train  and  M.  O.  R.  S.,  which  remained  in  the  Thiaucourt- 
Pont-a-Mousson  sector  till  the  end  of  the  war.  The  troops  went  into 
more  comfortable  billets  in  the  small  towns  along  the  Meuse  and  tlie 
training  schedules  were  resumed. 


Ho/rr    /     ri\ 


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vfe",»:g/  •>, 


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The  St.  Mihiel  Operation 


121 


ENLISTED  MEN   KILLED  IN  ACTION 
ST.  MIHIEL  OPERATION 


SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  Elon  E.  Hill,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Martin  J.  Jennings,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Leslie  McPherson,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Charles  Weaver,  Hq.  Co. 
*Pvt.  Frank   Lodick,   Co.   .\. 
•Pvt.  Thomas  MeCaffery,  Co.  \. 
*Sgt.  Percy  R.  Winch,  Co.  \. 

Pvt.  Dan  Antrillo,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  John  N.  Cool,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Auhrey  M.  Meserbey,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Alexander  Rogacki,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Lee  Slv,  Co.  B. 
•Corp.  Ross  W.  Welch,  Co.  B. 
•Pvt.  Daniel  Bron.ski,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  John 


Pvt.  John  Cimoch,  Co.  F. 
•Sgt.  Henry  J.  Fields,  Co.  F. 
Corp.  William  B.  Kent,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  George  Britt,  Co.  G. 
Pfc.  Richard  C.  Tramble,  Co.  G. 
Sgt.  William  Wood,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Thomas  D.  Costello,  Co.  H. 
Bug.  John   H.    Mason,   Co.    H. 
Pvt.  John  Salava,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Jeremiah  C.  Shallow,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Adams  Spohn,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  William  Twardoski,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Henry  K.  Weikel,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Carl  A.  Willig,  Co.  H. 
Nedzimski,  Co.  L. 


SIXTY-FIRST   INFANTRY 


•Pfc.  John  T.  Coleman,  Co.  D. 
•Pvt.  Feli.\  Jagodinsky,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  George  K.  Ditmars,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.  Joseph  C.  Ramires,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Jim  .\dams,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Solferino   Barberini,  Co.   H. 


Pvt.  Alfred  L.  Dyer,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  John   Corr,  Co.   L. 
Pvt.  Emery  L.  Frame,  Co.  L. 
•Pvt.  Albert  Korton,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  Ray  Miller,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  Harry  O.  Wiemar,  Co.  L. 


FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


♦Wag.  George  Fulton,  Hq.  Co. 
Wag.  John  H.  Smith,  Hq.  Co. 
Pvt.  Patrick  J.  McGuinness,  Co.  A. 
Sgt.  Senae  Begnacke,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  BLshop  M.  J 11  pin,  Co.  B. 


Pvt.  Ambrose  O'Keefe,  Co.  B. 
Sgt.  George  W.  Ackley,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Charles  L.  Jannetz,  Co.  C. 
Pfc.  Harry  Loose,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Otis  ijoss,  Co.  D. 


SIXTH    INFANTRY 


Corp.  Joseph  G.  .\rmistead,  Hq.  Co. 

Pfc.  Ervin  L.  Bolten,  Hq.  Co. 
•Pvt.  James  H.  Haywood,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Charles  Lorenz,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  John  K.  Sands,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Cornelius  F.  Strandburg,  Hq.  Co. 
•Corp.  Joseph  Bartosiewicz,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Walter  S.  Jumps,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Michael  P.  Smith,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  William  L.  Helms,  Co.  B. 

Cook  Ivory  W.  Woodward,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Cecil  Brummett,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  Henry  C.  Cunningham,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Edward  DeCalle,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Joseph  J.  Duffek,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Noah  Eckols,  Co.  C. 
•Pvt.  John  M.  Fitzgerald,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Jack  Foster,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Oscar  W.  Green,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Ward  Henderson,  Co.  C. 

(•)  Died  of  wounds. 


Pvt 
Pvt 
Pfc. 
Corp 
Corp 
Pvt. 
Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pfc. 
•Corp. 
Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Pfc. 
Pvt. 
Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Corp 


Henry  W.  HoUe,  Co.  C. 
Wojciech  l.efek,  Co.  C. 
John  Malone,  Co.  C. 

Claude  Sauls,  Co.  C. 

James  P.  Sullivan,  Co.  C. 
James  R.  Whittle,  Co.  C. 
George  W.  Young,  Co.  C. 
Hayes  A.  Cornelius,  Co.  E. 
John  B.  Gabbard,  Co.  E. 
Tom  Jones,  Co.  E. 
James  B.  Pryor,  Co.  E. 
Levi  Starr,  Co.  E. 
.  James  Tevnan,  Co.  E. 
Charles  F.  Barker,  Co.  F. 
John  J.  Connelly,  Co.  F. 
Dewitt  Gober,  Co.  F. 
Frank  Miecezkow.ski,  Co.  I 
Albert  Bobbins,  Co.  F. 
Milton  Sandler,  Co.  F. 
.  Donald  Taylor,  Co.  F. 


122 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


SIXTH    INFANTRY— r„H^»«,,/ 


Pvt.  James  F.  Calhoun.  Co.  G. 
•Pvt.  Charles  W.  Ard,  Co.  H. 
Pfc.   Rus.sell  Crabtree,  Co.   H. 
Sgt.  John  Dennison,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Richard  Williams,  Co.  H. 
Sgt.  Guy  -\.  Blalock,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Lloyd  Brewer,  Co.  I. 
Corp.  Mearle  C.  C<]oper,  Co.  I. 
Pfc.  Robert  M.  Davis,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Silvio  F.  DeCapito,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  George  W.  Decker,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Benjamin  Griffin,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  George  E.  Naekcr,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Galatana  Parravano,  Co.   I. 

Pvt. 


*Pvt.  William  Sulikx,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Mart  Wallace,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Sanuiel  H.  Duncan,  Co.  K. 

Pfc.  Laure  H.  Messinger,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Lester  Taylor,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Virgil  L.  Walker,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Leslie  B.  Adams,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Kelly  Elam,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Johii  E.  Hill,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.  George  T.  Hunter,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.   Raymond  Kerper,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  Joe  Kosivick,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.  James  E.  McDouglas,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  Andrew  P.  Alves,  Co.  M. 
James  Durbin,  Co.  M. 


ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 


Pfc.  Charles  E.  Boyer,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Raljih  J.  Davidson,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Edward  Tripp,  Hq.  Co. 
•Pfc.  John  E.  Socia,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Robert  O.  Weston,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  John   Brown,  Med.   Det. 

Pvt.  William  M.  Mylius,  Med.  Det. 

Pvt.  Culess  Christopher,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Steve  Evicz,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  John  Garrison,  Co.  A. 
*Sgt.  Roliert  F.  Lowe,  Co.  A. 

Corp.  Holly  F.  MacCaslin,  Co.  A. 

Pfc.  Edward   xManshieder,  Co.  A. 

Corp.  Cecil  Martin,  Co.  A. 

Pfc.  Florentine  Morales,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  James  Phillips,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  James   Roach,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Antonio  Santora,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Nils  Thompson,  Co.  A. 

Pfc.  Jeremiah  Zerbe,  Co.  .\. 

Pvt.  Leslie  Allen,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Guy  R.  Brown,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Nick  Casiano,  Co.  B. 
*Sgt.  Clarence  L.  Corey,  Co.  B. 

Mess  Sgt.  Virgilio  Curetto,  Co.  B. 

Mech.  David  Dean,  Co.  B. 
*Corp.  Clinton  F.  Delias,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Lawrence  Emmons,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Curvin   H.  Hei.ss,  Co.  B. 

Corji.  Homer  F.  Moidin,  Co.  B. 

1st  Sgt.  Clifford  Murphy,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  David  O'Connor.  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  Emilio  Orlando,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Ryer,  Co.  B. 
•Corp.  Robert  j".  Sal)iston.  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  John  C.  Stroup.  Co.  B. 
•Pvt.  Charles  J.  Wasch,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  John  Belzer,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Eath  Bush,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Arthur  W.  Cadwallader,  Co.   C. 

Pvt.  Mount  E.  Goulson,  Co.  C. 

(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


Corp.  James  W.   McCutcheun,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  Owen  J.  Rains,  Co.  C. 
*Pvt.  Ivan  L.  Scott,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Montgomery  A.  Sealy,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Eugene  Stuffelbauni,  Co.  C. 
♦Pvt.  Pleasant  Woods,  Co.  C. 
•Pvt.  William  J.  Wott,  Co.  C. 

Sgt.  Herman  Zeska,  Co.   C. 

Pvt.  Emil  B.  Blumchi,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Orville  E.  Fourman,  Co.  D. 
•Pfc.  Stephen  L.  Francis,  Co.  D. 
•Pvt.  Lada  Friedle,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  Rex  D.  Jenkins,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  John  Adams,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  James  E.  Armstrong,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Claude  L.  Fifer,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Robert  H.  Jones,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Richart  Levett,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Marvin  J.  Odom,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  John  M.  Wix,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Antoni  Klemieticz,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Tony  Montesi,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Maurice  Cotter,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Pietro  Di  Piazzo,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Harry  Getino,  Co.  G. 

Corp.  ,Tohn  D.  Haubert,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Tilgham  Meitzler,  Co.  G. 

Corp.  Ralph  V.  Morris,  Co.  G. 

Pfc.  Elliot  F.  Perry,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Steve  Yackumoich.  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Tom  Zauras,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.   Everett   Brothers,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Charles  Collier,  Co.  H. 
•Pvt.  Patrick  J.  Coyne,  Co.  H. 

Pfc.  Frank  R.  Gardner,  Co.  H. 

Pfc.  Dick  Gricas,  Co.  H. 

Corp.  George  W.  Hastings,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Oscar  Martin,  Co.   H. 

Mech.  Chester  Meek,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.   Ernest  Newberry,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Pellet.  Co.  H. 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation 


123 


ELEVENTH  ISF \WniY— Cuntmued 


Corp.  Frasier  E.  Smith,  Co.  H. 

Corp.  Marcus  W.  Cockerliam,  Co. 

Corp.  Ralph  McKeown,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Ira  A.  Miller,  Co.  I. 

Corp.  Jacob  VanEsen,  Co.  I. 

Sgt.  Tony  ^'ince,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Frank  Wilson,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  John  Williams,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Carr,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Charles  M.  Davis,  Co.  K. 
*Sgt.  Francis  Garland,  Co.   K. 

Sgt.  Jacob  Gorgoschilitz,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Samuel  I.  Jopp,  Co.   K, 
*Sgt.  James   Moran,  Co.   K. 

Pvt.  Bennie  Paul,  Co.  K. 

Sgt.  Cyrnier  Warras,  Co.   K. 

Corp.  Louis  Drenseck,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Grober  P.  Erb,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  Thomas  McCorraick,  Co.  L. 


Pvt.  Ezra  Mayo,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.  .Abraham"  Ohren,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  Thomas  Regan,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Thomas  P.  Vaughn,  Co.  L. 
*Corp.  Louis  Verbiscar,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  William  Weekly,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  John  R.  Wilson,  Co.  L. 

Pfc.  Lexie  Cherry,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Edward  G.  Dumler,  Co.  JL 

Pfc.  John  F.  Garven,  Co.  M. 
*Pfc.  Mark  I.  Good,  Co.  M. 

Corp.  Charles  Grimes,  Co.  M. 

Corp.  Edward  J.  Harmon,  Co.  M. 

Pfc.  Clarence  Hoff,  Co.   M. 

Sgt.  John  H.  Lewis,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Thom  Mathews,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Harlow  M.  Picton,  Co.  M. 
*Sgt.  Fred  S.  Rohrbeck,  Co.  M. 

Corp.  Herbert  C.  Ward,'  Co.  M. 


FIFTEENTH  M.VCHINE  GUN  BATT.\LION 


Mech.  Frank  W.  Brady,  Co.  A.  *Pvt. 

Pfc.  Harry    C.   Caliill,  Co.    B.  *Corp, 

Pvt.  Robert  L.  Roberts,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  John  C.  Russ,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Herman  G.  Steagall,  Co.  B.  Pfc. 

Pfc.  Hugh  A.  WiUiams,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

*Pfc.  Elbert  Wolfe,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Corp.  Josepli  Bailey,  Co.  C.  *Pvt. 

Pvt.  Rol)ert  Bracken,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  William  Cubljerl)^  Co.  C.  *Pvt. 

*Pvt.  Thomas  A.  Tobin. 


Harlie  Hazen,  Co.  C. 
.  William  P.  McCoU,  Co.  C. 
Urgan  J.  Mont,  Co.  C. 
Wil.son  Newton,  Co.  C. 
Ervin  Pearson,  Co.  C. 
Spencer  W.  Wallace,  Co.  C. 
Louis  Wilson,  Co.  C. 
Steve  Yendrick,  Co.  C. 
Thomas  Harmer,  Co.  D. 
William  T.  O'Hearn. 


TWENTIETH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 
Pfc.  Clayton  J.  Keller. 

TWENTY-FIRST  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Corp.  Myron  I).   Dodge,  Hq.  Co.  *Corp.  Sanford  Cain.  Btry.  Co. 

Pvt.  Hans  Miller,  Hq.  Co.  *Pfc.  Russell  L.  Cheatle,  Btry.  Co. 

Pvt.  Markey  Revnik,  Btry.  F. 


SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 


Pvt.  Anthony  Balcer 
*Pvt.  Edward   O.   Fugle. 


*Pvt.  Rudolph  Johnson. 
Corp.  .\llen  K.  Stelle. 


ENLISTED  MEN   KILLED  IN  ACTION 
SIXTIETH   INFANTRY'S  ACTION   WITH   FRENCH,   SEPTEMBER  2.5th 


Pvt.  Benjamin  H.  Carr,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  O-scar  A.  Noren,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Elmer  M.  Romaine,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  Frank  Hammond,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Henry  C.  Pauley,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Joe  Cadili,  Co.  C. 

(*)  Died  of  wounds. 


Pvt.  Abe  Cell,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Joseph  Jankiewicz,  Co.  C. 
Sgt.  Henry  L.  Ker.sey,  Co.  C. 
Bug.  Stewart  W.  Krider,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Elisha  Rocklin,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Martin  Gleason,  Co.  I. 


124  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

DIEULOUARD  SHELLING,  SEPTEMBER   29th 

ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 

*Cook  James  Augustine,  Co.  A.  Pvt.  Zeb  McCurry,  Co  .A. 

Pvt.  George  CoUard,  Co.  A.  *Pvt.  Quiller  Richardson,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  Hardnian  Deming,  Co.  A.  Pvt.  Thomas  Amies,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Grant  Dissinger,  Co.  A.  *Pvt.  Julius  Wooten,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  John  K.  Thatcher,  Co.  K. 

FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

*Pfc.  Ephrian  Thompson,  Med.  Det.  *Pvt.  Ocey  Jones.  Co.  C. 

*Sgt.  Albert  Chinn,  Co.  C.  *Corp.  Howard  Miller,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Charles  W.  Clark,  Co.  C.  *Pvt.  Henry  J.  Rammel,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Grant  W.  Cole,  Co.  C.  Pvt.  Robert  M.  Stevens,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  William  J.  DuValle.  Co.  C.  *Pvt.  John  B.  Swart,  Co.  C. 

•Pvt.  Joseph  Griffith,  Co.  C.  *Pvt.  Lester  W.  Taylor,  Co.  C. 

Sgt.  Clarence  J.  Weaver,  Co.  C. 

(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


The  St.  Mihiel  Operation  125 

BATTALION   AND   HIGHER   COMMANDERS    IN    FIFTH    DIVISION 

IN  ST.  MIHIEL  OPERATION 

Major  General  John  E.  McMahon,  Commanding  Division. 
First  I^ieutenant  Leslie  W.  Devereux,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Second  Lieutenant  Roy  F.  Ash,  Aide  de  Camp. 

GENERAL  STAFF 
Colonel  Clement  A.  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff. 

Major  Martin  C.  Shallenljerger,  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1. 
Major  Herbert  Parsons,  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-2. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  John  B.  Barnes,  .Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-3. 

PRINCIPAL  STAFF  OFFICERS 
Colonel  Robert  H.   Pierson,  Division  Surgeon. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Gilbert  M.  .\llen.  Division  Machine  Gun  Officer. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Charles  F.  Leonard,  Division  Signal  Officer. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Robert  G.  Peck,  Division  Inspector. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  David  P.  Wood,  Division  Adjutant. 
Major  P.  James  Cosgrave,  Division  Judge  .\dvocate. 
Major  Thomas  G.  Hayes,  Division  Ordnance  Officer. 
Major  Charles  Meals,  Division  Quartermaster. 
First  Lieutenant  A.  M.  Fisher,  Division  Gas  Officer. 
First  Lieutenant  Thomas  A.  Knight,  Secretary  to  General  Staff. 

NINTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 
Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner,  Commanding  brigade. 
First  Lieutenant  Frank  M.  Smith,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Second  Lieutenant  Rowland  H.  Peacock,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Major  James  D.  Rivet,  Brigade  .Vdjutant. 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 
Colonel  Frank  B.  Hawkins,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  Matthew  A.  Palen,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Geoft'rey  P.  Baldwin,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
Major  Lee  D.  Davis,  Commanding  third  battalion. 

SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 
Colonel  Hugh  D.  Wise,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  Donald  C.  Henley,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Charles    C.    Bankhead,    Commanding  second  battalion. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Lowe  A.  McClure,  Commanding  third  battalion. 

FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Major  Jens  A.  Doe,  Commanding  battalion. 

TENTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 
Colonel  Paul  B.  Malone,  Commanding  brigade. 
First  Lieutenant  Joseph  H.  Hinwood,  Jr.,  .\ide  de  Camp. 
Major  George  H.  van  de  Steeg,  Brigade  .-Adjutant. 

SIXTH  INF.'VNTRY 
Colonel  Henry  J.  Himt,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  George  H.  Huddleson,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Courtney  H.  Hodges,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
Major  John  W.  Leonard,  Commanding  third  battalion. 

ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 
Colonel  John  B.  Bennet,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  Frank  C.  Mahin,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  John  H.  Muncaster,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
Major  Everett  D.  Barlow,  Commanding  third  battalion  to  September  12th. 
Major  Richard  C.  Birmingham,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  September  13th- 


126  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

FIFTEENTH   MACHINE  GUN   BATTALION 

Major  William  M.  Grimes,  Commanding  battalion. 

FIFTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler,  Conmianding  brigade. 
First  Lieutenant  Jackson  H.  Boyd,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Second  Lieutenant  Howard  F.  Fletcher,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Major  John  Magruder,  Brigade  Adjutant. 

NINETEENTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Lieutenant  Colonel  C.  P.  Hollingsworth,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  John  S.  MacTaggart,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Walton  F.  Winton,  Conunanding  second  battalion. 

TWENTIETH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonel  Brook  Payne,  Commanding  regiment. 

Major  Cuyler  L.  Clarke,  Commanding  first  battalion. 

Major  George  I^.  Miller,  Conunanding  second  battalion. 

TWENTY-FIRST  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonel  Richard  H.  McMaster,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  George  S.  Gay,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Jean  A.  Jeancon,  Comnuinding  second  battalion. 
Captain  George  J.  Downing,  Commanding  third  battalion. 

SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 

Colonel  Lewis  M.  Adams,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  William  M.  Hoge,  Jr.,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Leon  L.  Morton,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
First  Lieutenant  Peter  Murphy,  Commanding  train. 

THIRTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Major  Walton  H.  Walker,  Commanding  battalion. 

NINTH  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 

Major  Deane  B.  Small,  Commanding  battalion. 

HEADQUARTERS  TROOP 

First  Lieutenant  Carl  \].  Luers,  Commanding  troop. 

FIFTH  DIVISION  TRAINS 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Harry  E.  Conistock,  Commanding  trains. 

FIFTH  SUPPLY  TRAIN 

Major  Oral  E.  Clark,  Commanding  train. 

FIFTH  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 

Lieutenant  Colonel  R.  John  West,  Commanding  train. 
Major  Robert  B.  Lorch,  Commanding  horsed  battalion. 
Major  Frederick  A.  Barker,  Commanding  motor  battalion. 

FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIN 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Carey  J.  Vaux,  Commanding  train. 

Major  Dana  W.  Drury,  Director  of  Field  Hospitals. 

Major  John  I.  Robinson,  Director  of  Ambulance  Companies  to  September  14th. 

Captain  Edward  C.  Morton,  Director  of  Ambulance  Companies  from  September  15th. 

FIFTH  MILITARY  POLICE 
Major  William  H.  Gill,  Commanding  Military  Police. 


Chapter  IV 
WINNING  THE  BOIS  DES  KAPPES 


flHE  first  of  October  saw  the  fortunes  of  the  Cen- 
tral Powers  wanin<>'  fast,  Marshal  Foch,  Su- 
preme Commander  of  the  Allied  Armies,  was 
striking  the  (Germans  hard  and  continually,  driv- 
ing first  here,  then  there,  exhausting  tlie  enemy 
leserves  and  forcing  ra2)idly  the  withdrawal  of 
tlie  Huns  from  France.  The  tide  that  had 
threatened  to  engulf  the  Entente  in  July  had 
turned  forever.  The  American  Army  had  fol- 
lowed up  its  victorious  drive  at  St.  Mihiel  by  the  hard-smashing  at- 
tack in  the  Argomie  and  on  the  jNIeuse.  Westward  the  French, 
British  and  Belgians  were  continuing  their  rapid  reconquest  of  terri- 
tory thej'  had  not  held  since  the  opening  days  of  the  war.  The  Boche 
were  being  driven  off  the  Chemin  des  Dames,  were  making  their  last 
stand  in  St.  Quentin,  Cambrai  and  Lens  and  had  recoiled  before  a 
terrific  wedge-drive  east  of  Ypres  in  Belgium. 

On  October  2nd  came  orders  for  the  Fifth  Division  to  move  to 
the  Souilly  Area,  southeast  of  Verdun,  ])reparatory  to  going  into 
that  inferno  where  the  best  of  the  Allied  forces,  our  First  Army,  was 
hammering  between  the  Argonne  and  the  Meuse  to  cut  the  artery  of 
the  German  line  of  communications,  tlie  jNIetz-Sedan-Hirson  rail- 
way. The  trains  began  the  toilsome  northward  trek  on  the  .'3rd,  while 
the  foot  troops  were  hurried  up  in  bulky  war-worn  French  camions 
a  night  later.  No  sooner  was  the  Division  arrived  in  Souilly  than 
the  orders  read  "the  Blercourt-Nixeville  region." 

Continuing  in  their  busses  the  doughboys  made  the  ten  kilo- 
meters further  north  and  set  up  pup-tents  for  their  bivouac  in  the 
open  fields  and  woods.  The  Red  Diamond  had  said  good-bye  to 
civilization,  to  the  land  of  peace  and  quiet,  to  whole-roofed  houses  and 
rest-giving  beds,  even  to  comfortable  liay  mows — for  henceforward 
there  were  to  be  no  billets  save  crumbled  villages,  artillery-riddled 


^T'%^, 


For  a  u'eek  preceding  their  entrance  into  the  Meuse-Arc/onne  fight,  the  men  of  the 
Fifth  Dii>ision  lived  in  the  damp  nndcrhriish  of  the  Foret  de  Hesse. 


Wi7ining  the  Bois  des  Bappes  129 

woods  and  muddy  shell-holes;  no  music  but  the  whine  of  the  obus, 
the  rattle  of  the  machine  gun  and  the  boom  of  the  cannon. 

Short  stay  was  made  at  Blereoui't-Xixeville.  That  night  of  the 
5th  the  march  was  resmiied  over  winding  trails  to  the  northwest  and 
the  Division  came  to  camp  in  the  wide  spreading  Foret  de  Hesse, 
fifteen  kilometers  west  of  "^^erdun  and  twenty  below  the  front  where 
our  divisions  were  pushing  back  the  Boche  from  north  of  Montfaucon, 
Cierges,  Nantillois,  Septsarges — towns  that  had  already  become 
famous  in  the  annals  of  American  achievement.  Division  Headquar- 
ters opened  at  Blercourt.  Every  unit  trained  as  never  before  for  the 
strenuous  days  that  were  sure  to  come.  Many  green  recruits  had 
been  added  to  the  rolls,  men  who  had  never  seen  a  hand  grenade,  who 
knew  not  the  "manual  of  the  gas  mask,"  who  had  not  learned  the  en- 
dearing qualities  of  the  Spi-ingfield.  Those  da\'s  in  the  woods  helped 
give  the  new  men  knowledge  of  their  weapons  and  showed  our  old- 
timers  wherein  they  might  profit  by  the  mistakes  of  St.  IVIihiel. 
There  was  food — plenty  of  hot,  invigorating  food,  which  went  far  to 
make  up  for  the  long  toilsome  drills  and  the  weary  nights  of  sleeping 
on  damp  ground  in  frequent  rain  and  cold. 

The  Fifth  was  designated  as  the  reserve  of  the  Third  Army 
Corps,  behind  the  Fourth  and  Eightieth  Divisions,  operating  just 
west  of  the  IVIeuse.  The  Seventh  Engineers  on  reaching  Blercoin-t 
received  only  seven  hours'  rest  when  they  were  ordered  to  march  to 
Esnes  and  take  up  road  maintenance  and  traffic  regulation  on  the 
Esnes-Malancourt  and  Esnes-Bethincourt  roads  under  Corps  orders. 
The  Engineer  Train  ojjeratcd  a  large  dump  in  the  town.  Only  four 
days  had  been  sj^ent  in  the  new  area  when  directions  came  for  enter- 
ing the  line.  Corps  ordered  the  relief  of  the  Eightieth  by  the  Fifth 
Division,  in  a  narrow  sector  just  east  of  Cunel  and  five  to  six  kilo- 
meters west  of  and  paralleling  the  jSIeuse.  The  right  limits  of  the 
area  were  described  as  running  from  Malancourt  to  Cuisy,  through 
Septsarges  in  a  direction  slightly  west  of  north,  to  the  southeastern 
edge  of  Bois  de  Fays ;  after  crossing  Bois  de  Fays  the  sector  widened 
out  by  turning  to  the  northeast,  reaching  the  Meuse  about  a  kilometer 
north  of  Brieulles.  On  the  left  the  boundary  followed  the  Avocourt 
road  to  Montfaucon,  thence  ran  northward  west  of  Xantillois  to 
Cunel.  From  Cunel  the  line  turned  northwest  and  opened  the  sector 
still  wider  by  including  Bantheville.  The  front  was  then  in  the 
neighborhood  of  Cunel  and  Bois  de  Fays;  thus  the  Fifth  was  prepar- 
ing to  enter  the  small  end  of  an  ever- widening  funnel ;  any  advance 
of  our  troops  would  bring  a  constantly  lengthening  front  line. 


SI. 


h; 


VJ 


Winning  the  Boitf  dcs  Rappes  131 

Preparatory  to  the  relief,  the  second  and  tliird  battalions  of  the 
Sixtieth  Infantry  and  the  third  of  the  Sixty-lirst,  with  the  Fourteenth 
Machine  Gun  Battalion,  moved  forward  on  the  afternoon  of  October 
10th  under  command  of  Colonel  Hawkins.  From  Bois  de  Hesse  the 
troops  followed  trails  east  of  Avocoiu't,  went  through  Bois  de  Malan- 
court  and  bivouacked  for  the  night  north  of  ruined  ^Nlalancourt.  On 
the  11th  the  Division  P.  C.  was  established  near  the  crossing  on  the 
Montfaucon-Cuisy  road  about  a  kilometer  southwest  of  Fayel  Ferme. 
The  post  of  command  of  the  Ninth  Brigade,  which  was  designated 
to  occupy  the  sector,  was  set  up  at  Xantillois.  The  Tenth  Brigade, 
in  reserve,  located  its  P.  C.  in  Bois  de  Cuisy,  two  kilometers  in  rear 
of  Division  Headquarters. 

The  sector  on  which  the  Division  w-as  embarking  had  been  the 
scene  of  terrific  fighting  since  the  launching  of  the  assault  on  Sep- 
tember 26th.  American  bombardments  and  barrages  and  German 
counterfire  had  converted  the  open  ridges,  ravines  and  slopes  into 
stretches  of  cluu-ned  and  shell-torn  earth.  The  wooded  areas,  dense 
with  tangled  underbrush,  looked  as  though  they  had  been  struck  by 
fierce  cyclones.  The  villages  of  the  area  were  wrecked  and  ruined. 
In  that  initial  attack  the  Seventy-ninth  Division  had  stormed  the 
heights  of  ]Montfaucon  and  carried  the  advance  to  Xantillois,  where 
the  impulse  had  spent  itself.  Then  on  October  3rd  the  Eightieth 
Division  had  gone  in  on  a  narrow  front  of  less  than  two  kilometers, 
astride  the  north-south  road  through  Nantillois,  with  the  Fourth 
Division  on  its  right  and  the  Third  Division  on  its  left.  The  express 
mission  of  the  Eightieth  was  the  taking  of  the  Bois  des  Ogons,  two 
kilometers  north  of  Xantillois;  and  for  two  davs  the  forces  struasrled 
to  ci'oss  the  open  ravines  and  ridges.  After  penetrating  the  thick 
woods  of  Ogons  the  Division  beat  for  four  days  against  the  fortress 
positions  of  Ferme  de  la  Madeleine  and  the  many  pillboxes  and  con- 
crete trenches  on  the  hill  east  of  the  farm  and  west  of  Bois  de  Fays. 
Finally  on  the  afternoon  of  October  9th  the  319th  Infantry  stormed 
those  strongholds  of  the  Kriemhilde  Stellung  and  succeeded  in  plac- 
ing outposts  as  far  north  as  La  Ville  au  Bois  Ferme  and  Bois  de 
Fays.  The  Fourth  Division  to  the  right  of  the  Eightieth  Division 
finally  penetrated  the  western  portions  of  Bois  de  Foret,  north  of  the 
Cunel-Brieulles  road,  on  October  11th. 

When  the  Fifth  Division  came  to  the  relief  of  the  Eightieth  on 
the  11th  the  front  held  was  reported  to  be  from  the  neighborhood  of 
Cunel  eastward  along  the  road  to  Brieulles,  with  a  line  of  surveillance 
north  of  Cunel  and  including  the  Bois  de  Foret.  It  was  ordered  that 
battalions  of  the  319th  and  320th  Infantrv  be  relieved  in  the  vicinity 


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Winning  the  Bois  dcs  lioppes  133 

of  the  small  triangular  wood  called  St.  C'hristophe,  east  of  Cunel  and 
at  the  western  edge  of  Bois  de  Foret.  On  the  right,  where  the  sector 
widened  to  the  northeast,  elements  of  the  Fom-th  Division  were  to  be 
relieved  in  Bois  de  Pent  de  Faux  and  western  and  central  Bois  de 
Foret. 

General  Castner  organized  his  troops  in  the  familiar  formation, 
regiments  in  line,  battalions  echeloned  in  depth — Colonel  Wise  with 
the  Sixty-first  on  the  right,  Colonel  Hawkins  on  the  left  with  the 
Sixtieth.  The  battalions  remaining  in  Bois  de  Hesse  were  marched 
up  to  Bois  de  Montfaucon.  The  companies  of  the  Fourteenth  Ma- 
chine Gun  Battalion  were  assigned  to  the  infantry  battalions.  Cap- 
tain Glasgow  (1st  Bn.,  61st)  and  Major  Davis  (3rd  Bn.,  60th)  were 
named  to  take  over  the  outjjost  positions.  Major  Rivet  (3rd  lin., 
61st)  and  Major  Baldwin  (2nd  Bn.,  60th)  were  to  form  the  support 
and  Captain  Stark  ('2nd  Bn.,  61st)  and  Lieutenant  Colonel  Peyton 
(1st  Bn.,  60th)  were  to  be  in  reserve.  General  Malone  marched  two 
battalions  of  his  reserve  brigade  to  the  Nantillois  area  and  placed  the 
rest  of  his  forces  in  Bois  de  Cuisy  and  east  of  ]VIontfaucon. 

Reconnaissance  by  the  officers  of  the  relieving  units  discovered 
that  the  actual  front  line  held  was  not  the  road  Cunel-Brieulles  as 
stated  in  the  Field  Order,  but  that  the  forces  of  the  Eightieth  Division 
were  some  distance  south,  in  Bois  de  jNIalaumont  and  south  of  Cunel. 
Arrangements  were  made  with  General  Brett  of  the  160th  Brigade 
that  no  attempt  would  be  made  to  place  troops  on  the  desired  line 
until  after  the  reliefs  had  all  been  completed.  Finally  when  the  relief 
was  well  under  way,  about  4  a.  m.,  orders  came  from  the  Corps  direct- 
ing that  only  one  battalion  should  be  used  to  relieve  the  Eightieth 
Division's  outposts  and  front  lines  and  one  battalion  for  the  Fourth 
Division  in  Bois  de  Foret.  The  remainder  of  the  brigade  should  be 
held  south  of  an  east  and  west  line  through  La  Ville  au  Bois  Ferme, 
and  the  Fourth  Division  would  continue  to  hold  the  central  and 
eastern  parts  of  Bois  de  Foret  and  Bois  de  Pent  de  Faux  which  had 
been  designated  previously  as  a  part  of  the  Fifth  Division  sector. 

From  the  very  first  entrance  of  our  troops  into  the  area  they 
were  subjected  to  harassing  shell-fire.  Inasmuch  as  the  sector  was 
only  a  few  kilometers  west  of  the  Meuse  and  throughout  its  entire 
length  was  visible  from  the  eastern  heights  still  in  the  hands  of  the 
enemy,  his  artillery  sheltered  in  those  hills  could  constantly  deluge 
the  whole  region  with  gas.  shrapnel  and  high-explosive.  Casualties 
were  inflicted  on  our  advancing  troops,  even  in  the  back  areas  of 
Montfaucon  and  Nantillois.  Guides  from  the  Eightieth  Division 
took  the  men  of  the  Ninth  Brigade  forward  from  Nantillois  about 


Winning  the  Bois  des  Rappes  13S 

midnight  of  the  11th,  across  roads  and  tlirough  shell-pitted  fields  and 
broken  woods,  subjected  to  continuous  enemy  artillery  fire,  which 
at  times  became  barrage-like  in  intensity.  By  morning  all  the 
Eightieth  was  relieved.  Most  of  the  Fourth  Division  units  in  our 
sector  were  relieved  somewhat  later.  Command  passed  to  General 
McMahon  at  6  a.  m.  of  October  12th. 

Immediately  after  our  troops  were  in  position  the  front-line  bat- 
talions sent  forward  strong  reconnaissance  patrols  in  the  endeavor 
to  bring  the  lines  up  to  points  supposedly  taken  over.  Companies 
K,  L  and  M  of  the  Sixtieth  Infantry,  with  half  a  platoon  of  Com- 
pany A  of  the  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun,  advanced  up  the  narrow 
gauge  railroad  cut  east  of  Cunel.  Resistance  was  encountered  im- 
mediately. The  enemy  had  his  machine  gun  outposts  all  around  the 
town  and  to  the  east  and  they  greeted  our  patrols  with  a  prompt 
sputter  of  lead.  The  isolated  nests  did  not  stop  those  men,  however, 
for  singly  or  in  groups  they  rushed  gun  after  gun,  killing  or  taking 
prisoner  the  crews  and  silencing  the  offending  mitrailleuses.  Lieu- 
tenant Samuel  Woodfill,  leading  Company  INI,  swept  the  way  by  his 
own  personal  valoi-,  wiping  out  four  machine  gun  nests,  killing  more 
than  a  dozen  Boche  and  capturing  three  others. 

Company  M  was  meeting  heavy  fire  and  the  commander  rushed 
forward,  followed  by  two  soldiers  at  twenty-five  yards.  He  worked 
his  way  around  to  the  flank  of  the  nest  whence  came  the  heavy  fire, 
leaving  the  two  men  in  front.  When  he  got  within  ten  yards  of  the 
gun  it  ceased  firing  and  four  of  the  enemy  apjieared.  Three  were 
shot  by  Lieutenant  Woodfill,  i)ut  the  fourth,  an  oflncer,  rushed  at  him. 
He  attempted  to  club  the  German  with  his  rifle.  After  a  hand-to- 
hand  struggle.  Lieutenant  Woodfill  killed  the  oflncer  with  a  pistol 
shot. 

The  advance  of  the  Company  continued  till  another  machine 
gun  nest  was  encountered.  Calling  on  his  men  to  follow,  the  lieuten- 
ant rushed  ahead  of  his  line  in  the  face  of  the  fire  and  when  several 
of  the  enemy  appeared  he  shot  them,  capturing  three  other  members 
of  the  crew  and  silencing  the  gun.  The  advance  went  on  and  for  a 
third  time  the  lieutenant  displayed  his  bravery  by  charging  another 
machine  gun  position,  killing  five  men  in  one  pit  with  his  rifle.  He 
then  drew  his  revolver  and  started  to  jump  into  the  pit  when  two 
other  guiuiers  only  a  few  yards  away  turned  their  gun  on  him.  Fail- 
ing to  kill  them  with  his  revolver.  Lieutenant  Woodfill  grabbed  up  a 
pick  and  dispatched  them  both.  For  such  conspicuous  daring  and 
gallantry  this  ofiicer  of  the  Sixtieth  was  awarded  the  Medal  of  Honor. 


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Winning  tlic  Boi.s  dcs  linppes  137 

The  2)atrols  succeeded  in  reaching  the  northern  edges  of  Bois  de 
la  I'ultiere  opposed  by  these  scattered  machine  gun  posts.  Other 
jjarties  entered  Cunel  and  cleaned  uji  the  town.  In  and  about  the 
little  wood  St.  Christophe  six  prisoners  were  taken  from  four  differ- 
ent regiments,  indicating  that  tlie  enemy  had  massed  his  troops  and 
was  determined  to  hold  his  ground  with  the  utmost  tenacity.  Re- 
treating Boche  had  sounded  the  alarm,  for  shortly  after  Cunel  and 
Pultiere  had  been  occupied  a  terrific  barrage  was  laid  on  those  areas. 
Thei'e  was  no  support  on  the  left  and  no  liaison  on  the  right,  so  that 
the  patrols  relin(iuished  their  gains,  being  without  orders  to  hold  or 
to  establish  a  new  front.  The  withdrawal  to  the  region  of  the  Cunel 
road  was  carried  out  with  many  losses  from  the  intense  shelling. 
Half  a  hundred  casualties  were  the  residt  of  the  morning's  action. 

On  the  right  the  first  l)attalion  of  the  Sixty-first,  supported  by 
the  third  battalion,  advanced  to  the  northern  edge  of  the  western  por- 
tion of  Bois  de  Foret.  The  paths  were  swept  by  shell-fire  and  enemy 
machine  guns  Avere  ever  acti\'e.  Captain  Glasgow  and  most  of  his 
officers  were  wounded  but  the  companies  held  on.  Instead  of  playing 
out,  the  artillery  fire  became  more  intense  as  the  forenoon  passed. 
The  men  were  disorganized  In'  the  barrage  and  by  the  thick  under- 
growth of  Bois  de  Foret.  ^Nlajor  liivet  sent  Company  jNI  to  steady 
the  lines. 

In  the  afternoon  the  Sixtieth  sent  out  another  patrol.  Com- 
panies G  and  H  went  forward  east  of  Cunel  thi-ough  St.  Christophe. 
On  the  open  ground  between  Bois  de  Foret  and  Bois  de  la  Pultiere 
the  combat  groups  were  caught  in  another  heavy  barrage.  Somehow 
the  report  came  that  the  enemy  was  counterattacking  with  tanks. 
No  tanks  appeared  and  the  enemy's  infantry  was  held  oft'  by  the 
groups  in  the  wood.  Having  located  the  enemy's  position,  with  the 
areas  defended  by  machine  gun  and  artillery  fire,  the  patrol  retired 
and  reported  the  result  of  the  afternoon's  work.  Company  G  was 
withdrawn  to  the  support  line  and  Comjjany  H  joined  the  third 
battalion  which  had  suffered  from  its  adventure  in  Cunel  and  Pultiere 
in  the  morning.  This  company  established  liaison  with  the  Sixty- 
first,  over  six  hundred  meters  to  the  right.  A  barrage  from  our 
artillery,  the  15.5th  Field  Artillery  Brigade,  which  we  had  taken  over 
from  the  Eightieth  Division,  had  helped  break  ujj  the  counterattack 
of  the  afternoon,  but  skirmishing  between  snijjcrs  and  machine  gun- 
ners kept  up  all  night.  All  our  areas  from  foremost  outposts  to  rear 
echelons  at  Xantillois  were  subjected  to  heavy  shelling. 

At  7  p.  M.  of  the  12th  orders  had  arrived  directly  that  the  Ninth 
Brigade  be  relieved  that  night  by  the  Third  Division,  so  that  the 


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Fifth  Division  might  be  re-formed  for  an  attack.  The  Tliird  was  on 
our  left  and  liad  only  to  extend  its  lines  to  the  east  in  taking  over  our 
sector,  but  movement  was  very  slow  on  account  of  the  constant 
harassing  fire  from  east  of  the  Meuse.  No  signs  of  relief  came  to  the 
Sixtieth  until  about  5  a.  m.  of  the  13th,  when  Colonel  Hawkins  was 
informed  that  the  Thirtieth  Infantry  had  taken  the  positions  they 
desired  to  occupy  and  that  his  regiment  might  withdraw.  Thus  the 
withdrawal  was  begun  in  daylight.  The  clear  weather  enabled  the 
enemy  observers  on  the  heights  across  the  river  to  direct  their  artillery 
fire  with  telling  accuracy.  Despite  the  movement  of  only  small  irreg- 
ular parties  many  men  were  lost,  some  casualties,  some  Ijy  separation 
from  their  companies  in  the  strange  territory.  Even  the  place  of 
assembly  south  of  Bois  dc  Cuncl  was  under  fire.  The  reorganization 
of  the  worn  and  much-mixed  units  was  begun  under  difi!iculties.  Sec- 
ond Lieutenant  David  Hockstein  of  the  Sixtieth  had  been  killed  and 
Lieutenant  Sanuiel  J.  Gowler  was  mortally  wounded  in  the  day's 
fighting. 

Elements  of  the  Third  Di\  ision  were  all  day  filtering  through 
the  lines  of  the  Sixty-first,  and  it  was  not  until  4  p.  m.  that  that  regi- 
ment was  relieved.  As  Colonel  Wise  reported,  "Skirmishing  and 
fighting  between  infantry  units  became  desidtf)ry  but  IJoche  ai-tillery 
fire  became  ever  more  active.  Our  i-egiment  was  ])ut  in  the  position 
of  simply  grinding  its  teeth  and  holding  on  to  its  position  in  the  face 
of  a  terrific  bombardment  to  which  they  could  not  retaliate.  From 
it  they  got  under  shelter  as  best  they  could  by  hastily  digging  in." 
I^ate  in  the  afternoon  the  regiment  moved  in  small  groups  to  Bois  de 
Beuge,  southwest  of  Nantillois.  often  stopped  l)y  barrages.  The 
units  were  badly  disorganized  largely  due  to  the  necessity  of  the  regi- 
ment's having  to  move  first  to  the  rear  and  then  to  the  left  in  order 
to  take  up  its  position  for  the  attack  of  the  IJ-th.  The  Sixty-first  had 
lost  Chaplain  J.  A.  Deaver  and  Lieutenants  Willoughby  R.  Marks, 
Herbert  G.  Hollister:  Second  Lieutenant  Alfred  G.  Sudborough  of 
the  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  was  mortally  wounded. 

The  Division  had  suffered  severely  from  its  exposure  to  a  day 
and  a  half  of  continuous  shelling.  Nevertheless  the  forward  move- 
ment of  the  Ninth  Brigade  in  bringing  its  lines  abreast  of  and  even 
beyond  the  lines  of  the  adjoining  divisions  had  relieved  for  the  first 
time  the  enemy's  pressure  on  the  right  flank  of  the  Fourth  Division 
and  on  the  left  flank  of  the  Third  Division. 

The  Fifth  Di\ision's  attack  had  Ijeen  set  unofl^cially  for  the  13th, 
but  on  account  of  the  disi)osition  of  our  troops  had  been  later  changed 
to  the  14th.     The  Third  Corps  was  to  drive  to  the  northwest  and 


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Winning  the  Bois  des  Rappcs  141 

connect  with  the  Fifth  Corj^s,  driving-  northeast  further  to  the  left. 
General  Malone's  Tenth  Brigade  liad  been  selected  as  the  assault 
brigade.  The  Third  Division  formed  the  Corps  support  and  the 
Fourth  the  reserve.  The  Chief  of  Staff  and  General  Malone  were 
called  to  Corps  Headcjuarters  for  consultation  on  the  morning  of  the 
12th,  where  the  plans  for  the  attack  were  discussed  very  thoroughly. 

The  operation  from  the  start  promised  to  be  a  hard  one.  Acting 
in  conjunction  with  General  Mc Arthur's  brigade  of  the  Forty-second 
Division,  which  would  attack  west  of  Sommerance,  the  Tenth  Brigade 
was  to  drive  across  open  ground  visible  from  the  jMeuse  heights,  to- 
ward the  junction  point  at  Grand  Carre  Ferme.  The  lines  would 
have  to  pass  first  between  Cunel  and  Romagne,  both  still  in  the  hands 
of  the  enemy  and  filled  with  machine  guns  and  snipers.  North  of 
Cunel  was  Bois  de  la  Pultiere  and  then  Bois  des  Rappes,  both  enemy 
strongholds  from  which  enfilading  fire  could  mow  down  our  troops  in 
any  attempt  to  advance  past  them.  Northwest  of  Romagne,  on  the 
hills  west  of  the  Andon  Ran,  were  Bois  de  Chauvignon  and  Bois  de 
Bantheville,  also  in  the  hands  of  the  Germans  and  commanding  the 
path  of  oin-  proposed  advance.  On  the  Andon  stream  two  kilometers 
north  of  Romagne  was  the  town  of  Bantheville,  which  our  troops  were 
to  occupy  before  mounting  the  open  slopes,  exposed  to  one-pounder 
and  artillerj^  fire  from  all  the  ground  to  the  north. 

Advance  without  co-operation  on  the  flanks  would  be  impossible. 
General  ^Malone's  efforts  secured  the  promise  that  the  Thirty-second 
Division  holding  the  sector  to  the  left  of  our  proposed  attack  would 
also  advance  and  take  Romagne  and  neutralize  the  resistance  in  the 
woods  west  of  the  Andon.  One  regiment  of  General  Castner's  bri- 
gade was  to  attack  Cimel  and  the  woods  Pultiei-e  and  Rappes.  At 
first  it  was  proposed  to  place  a  smoke  curtain  and  an  artillery  barrage 
along  the  western  edges  of  Pultiere  and  Rappe  and  to  have  elements 
of  the  Ninth  Brigade  pass  through  the  assaulting  column  to  cover 
the  right  flank  in  its  passage.  General  Babbitt,  commanding  the 
artillery  had  not  enough  smoke  to  cover  the  whole  advance,  however, 
and  the  column  would  have  to  pass  too  close  to  the  woods  to  leave  it 
unconquered.  Accordingly  a  direct  attack  by  the  Ninth  Brigade  on 
Bois  de  la  Pultiere  and  Bois  des  Rappes,  througli  Cunel,  was  decided 
upon  after  the  necessary  authority  had  been  obtained  from  Corps 
Headquarters. 

The  attack  was  ordered  for  8:30  a.  m.  of  October  lith.  On  the 
afternoon  of  the  13th  General  Malone  moved  his  post  of  command 
to  General  Castner's  headquarters  at  Nantillois.  The  two  brigade 
commanders  were  able  to  confer  constantly  throughout  the  attack. 


\g^:f  ■'T^'J.l 


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Winnmg  the  Bo'is  dcs  Itappes  US 

At  dusk  the  troops  of  the  Tenth  Brioade  moved  up  toward  tlieir 
positions  for  the  operation  and  took  their  assault  formation.  The 
Sixth  Infantry  was  on  the  left  with  Major  Leonard's  third  battalion 
leading.  Major  McLean's  first  battalion  in  support  and  JSIajor 
Hodges'  second  battalion  in  reser\e.  On  the  right  the  Eleventh  In- 
fantry was  formed  with  INIajor  Muncaster's  second  battalion  in  as- 
sault. Major  Birmingham's  third  battalion  in  support  and  Major 
Mahin's  first  battalion  in  reserve.  To  attack  the  woods  on  the  right 
was  the  mission  of  the  Sixtieth,  in  colmnn  of  battalions — Lieutenant 
Colonel  Peyton,  first  battalion,  assault;  Major  Baldwin,  second  bat- 
talion, support;  Major  Davis,  third  battalion,  reserve.  The  Sixty- 
first  formed  in  rear  of  the  Tenth  Brigade — second  battalion  (Captain 
Stark)  on  the  left  behind  the  Sixth  and  third  l)attalion  (Major 
Rivet)  on  the  right  in  rear  of  the  Eleventh.  The  first  battalion  (Cap- 
tain Olmstead)  was  behind  the  third  battalion  and  maintained  liaison 
with  the  reserve  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth.  The  Fifty-eighth  Infantry 
was  attached  to  the  Fifth  Division  and  held  in  reserve  in  Bois  de 
Beuge.  Companies  E  and  F  of  the  Seventh  Engineers  were  attached 
to  the  assault  battalions  of  the  Tenth  Brigade,  carrying  improvised 
foot-bridges  for  the  crossing  of  the  Andon  Brook.  Company  D  of 
the  Engineers  was  attached  to  the  assault  battalions  of  the  Ninth 
Brigade  for  cutting  wire  and  mopping-up  purposes  and  the  first 
battalion  (less  Company  C,  on  detached  service)  was  assigned  to 
station  in  the  Bois  de  Beuge  as  part  of  the  divisional  reserve. 

Reconnaissance  proved  that,  as  in  the  case  of  the  relief  of  the 
Eightieth  Division  on  the  11th,  the  line  actually  held  was  consider- 
ably in  rear  of  the  one  specified  in  the  attack  order.  Our  assault 
battalions  found  the  junmping-ofi"  line  to  be  the  Tranchee  de  la 
ISIamelle,  three-quarters  of  a  kilometer  south  of  the  announced  front 
instead  of  "just  south  of  the  Cunel-Romagne  road."  The  companies 
occupied  the  old  trench  which  had  been  a  part  of  the  Kriemhilde 
Stellung  with  the  troops  of  the  Thii'd  Division.  Word  of  the  change 
in  the  jumping-off  line  was  sent  to  Division  Headquarters,  but  it  is 
probable  that  the  information  did  not  reach  our  artillery  in  time  for 
them  to  shorten  their  barrage  correspondingly,  to  wipe  out  the  Ger- 
man outposts  and  front  lines. 

Not  long  before  the  attack  the  field  order  of  the  attacking  bri- 
gade of  the  Thirty-second  Division  reached  General  Malone,  and 
indicated  that  the  attack  on  the  left  against  Romagne  and  the  woods 
to  the  west  would  not  start  till  three  hours  after  our  own  advance. 
An  urgent  request  for  immediate  protection  on  our  left  flank  secured 
a  change  of  the  order  and  co-ordination  of  the  hours  of  attack.     At 


a, 
e 

as 


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JVinninc/  the  Bois  dcs  Rap  pes  145 

General  Maloiie's  request  Major  Iloge's  first  battalion  of  Seventh 
Engineers  was  attached  to  the  Tentli  Brigade  as  infantry  and  thrown 
in  to  protect  the  exposed  left  flank  and  to  efl^'ect  liaison  with  the 
Thirty-second  Division. 

The  enemy  had  learned  of  om-  proposed  attack  (from  a  deserter 
from  the  American  Army,  as  it  later  appeared  in  intelligence  re- 
ports), and  our  own  destructive  Are  had  not  yet  commenced  when 
the  Boche  put  down  the  strongest  counterfire  our  men  had  ever  seen. 
For  two  hours  the  positions  of  the  assault  battalions  were  raked  with 
high-ex])losive.  Losses  were  severe  and  some  confusion  was  felt  bc- 
foi-e  the  attack  was  started.  The  bombardment  by  our  artillery 
started  at  6:30  a.  m.  To  the  lo.5th  Brigade  had  been  added  two  regi- 
ments from  the  Fourth  Brigade,  two  regiments  of  the  Third  Brigade, 
the  4.5()th  R.  A.  L.,  the  'i.^Oth  K.  A.  C.  P.,  and  battalions  from  the 
4..>4th.  330th  and  301st  R.  A.  L. 

At  8:30  A.  M.  the  assault  was  launched  with  \-io:or  and  courage, 
despite  the  punishment  that  had  just  been  undergone.  The  men  still 
remembered  the  victorious  rush  at  St.  ^lihiel  and  dashed  forward 
impetuously.  But  it  was  a  different  enemy  here,  one  who  was  stick- 
ing till  the  last  and  fighting  for  every  foot  of  the  ground.  Three 
nu'nutcs  after  the  hour  H  an  intense  barrage  descended  on  our  ad- 
vancing waves.  Major  Muncaster  termed  it  "a  band  of  steel  across 
our  front."  Men  fell  all  around  but  the  attack  never  faltered  and 
passed  through  the  storm.  As  the  thinned  lines  left  the  trench 
Mamelle  and  topped  the  crest  just  in  front  of  it  they  were  met  with 
a  strong  fire  from  hostile  machine  gims  scattered  along  the  entire 
stretch  of  the  valley  ahead.  Our  own  artillery  barrage  had  not  been 
close  enough  to  our  lines  to  be  effective  and  our  battalions  looked 
down  into  Ravin  des  Perrieres  and  at  the  Romagne-Cunel  road, 
thickly  populated  with  German  machine  gun  nests. 

Nevertheless,  the  waves  rolled  on  down  into  the  valley.  Machine 
guns  of  the  accompanying  Fifteenth  Battalion  were  brought  uj)  to 
the  infantrj'  assault  lines  because  of  the  heavy  losses  in  personnel. 
The  fire  of  the  Boche  was  returned  with  interest.  The  doughboys 
vied  with  each  other  in  deeds  of  thrilling  daring.  By  marching  fii-e, 
by  flanking  and  by  rushing,  the  opposition  was  literally  exterminated. 
Time  after  time  hostile  guns  were  silenced  by  the  use  of  machine  gun, 
accurate  rifle  or  deadly  bayonet.  There  was  Private  Horn  of  Com- 
pany D.  Seventh  Engineers,  who  on  entering  a  dugout  in  the  valley 
and  finding  a  German  major  and  his  orderly,  killed  the  major  and 
captured  the  orderly.  INIajors  Leonard  and  Muncaster  were  leading 
their  battalions  and  encouraging  their  men  in  the  assault. 


Winning  the  Buis  dcs  Rappes  147 

The  lines  passed  the  road  and  mounted  the  liill  on  the  north, 
leaving  hehind  scores  of  German  dead.  IJiit  the  left  was  held  up  hy 
the  concentrated  fire  from  Roniagne,  which  the  Thirty-second  Divi- 
sion had  not  succeeded  in  taking.  Companies  A  and  B  of  the  Seventli 
Engineers,  who  had  heen  detailed  for  the  flank  guard  in  such  an 
emergency,  fought  valiantly  on  the  left  of  the  Sixth  Infantry  and 
took  twenty-seven  prisoners  of  the  Twenty-eighth  Prussian  Division, 
several  machine  guns  and  a  one-pounder  gun  in  the  little  wood  near 
the  town.  It  was  not  till  mid-afternoon  that  the  Thirty-second 
Division  reached  Roniagne  and  with  the  aid  of  our  Engineers  com- 
jjanies  drove  the  enemy  northward. 

In  spite  of  the  hostile  shelling  from  which  there  was  no  relief 
and  which  there  was  no  means  (jf  silencing,  the  troops  slowly  forged 
ahead.  The  bursting  shells  rendered  the  muddy  fields  a  sea  of  death. 
The  engineers  who  had  gone  forward  to  bridge  the  Andon  found  no 
need  for  engineer  work,  threw  down  their  matei-ial  and  fought  along- 
side infantrymen  and  machine  gunners,  proving  their  worth  as 
combatants  as  well  as  technical  troops.  In  the  fierce  fighting  each 
company  of  that  second  battalion  of  the  Engineers  lost  its  leader. 
Captain  C.  J.  ]Moore  of  Company  E,  First  Lieutenant  R.  ]M.  Wilson 
of  Company  F,  and  First  Lieutenant  L.  C.  Brown  of  the  CompauY 
D  detachment  fell  mortally  wounded.  A  fourth  Engineer  officer, 
Second  Lieutenant  Henry  H.  Russell,  was  also  killed  that  day. 

The  attack  might  have  been  pushed  on  northward,  down  into 
the  valley  of  the  Andon,  across  the  stream,  through  Bantheville  and 
to  the  objective,  had  not  the  lines  been  struck  by  a  concentrati(jn  of 
fire  from  three  directions.  From  Bois  de  la  Pidtiere  and  Bois  des 
Rappes  on  the  east,  from  Roniagne  and  Bois  Chauvignon  on  the  west 
and  from  the  direction  of  Bantheville  straight  ahead,  came  the  steady, 
murderous  stream  of  machine  gun  and  rifle  bullets.  Overhead  flew 
the  whiz-hangs,  and  the  shrapnel  popped.  The  waves  were  stopped. 
Further  advance,  until  the  woods  on  right  and  left  were  cleared, 
meant  disaster,  even  extinction.  The  valley  of  the  Andon  could  not 
be  reached.  The  lines  of  the  Tenth  Brigade  i-an  in  zigzag  from 
near  Romagne  across  Hills  260  and  271  toward  Bois  de  la  Pultiere, 
when  about  10  o'clock  progress  was  held  ujj. 

The  Sixtieth  Infantry,  reinforced  by  the  first  battalion  of  the 
Sixty-first,  could  not  take  the  northern  part  of  Bois  de  la  Pultiere 
and  had  not  penetrated  Bois  des  Rappes.  The  cleaning  up  of  these 
woods  was  a  full-sized  operation  in  itself,  for  the  thick  underbrush 
was  everywhere  set  with  machine  guns.  The  Boche  had  prepared 
for  such  a  drive  on  their  territoi-v  bv  makinu-  of  these  woods  regular 


1= 

a. 


5  ^ 


13 


a. 


a. 


1:4...  •-,,.    i...^ 


Winning  the  liais  des  liappes  149 

fortresses.  The  battalions  of  the  Sixtieth,  reduced  in  numbers  and 
worn  out  by  their  lack  of  rest  and  sleep  in  the  two  days'  occupation 
of  the  front  under  constant  fire,  had  advanced  through  Cunel  in  the 
face  of  the  ul)iquitous  machine  gun  and  artillery  fire.  Company  B. 
commanded  by  Captain  George  K.  Howitt,  and  Company  C,  under 
Captain  J.  E.  Haywood,  leading  the  attack,  fought  hard  and  with 
exceptional  courage  and  gallantry,  suffering  appalling  losses.  It  was 
a  question  of  forcing  every  bush  and  mopping  every  hillock  and 
trench. 

With  his  battalion  completely  held  up  l)y  the  hostile  machine 
gun  fire,  Lieutenant  Colonel  Peyton  went  forward  with  a  runner  to 
reconnoiter  the  enemy's  positions.  Skirting  his  right  fiank  and  climb- 
ing a  little  knoll  in  the  woods,  the  l)attalion  commander  beheld  a  Crcr- 
man  gun  firing  on  his  men,  not  forty  meters  away.  The  nest  was 
cleverly  constructed  and  well  camouflaged  and  was  discovered  to  the 
colonel  only  because  he  had  come  upon  it  from  the  flank.  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Peyton's  runner,  with  his  rifle,  killed  the  operator  of  the  gun, 
but  immediately  another  Boche  appeared  from  the  shelter  and  re- 
sumed the  fire.  Again  the  dougliljoy  shot  the  machine  gunner,  but 
before  our  combat  groups  could  rusii  the  nest  a  third  (icrman  took 
his  place  at  the  machine  gun.  The  colonel  and  his  companion  were 
well  hidden,  and  the  third  enemy  marksman  was  killed.  A  fourth 
and  a  fifth  Boche  gunners  were  slain,  one  after  another,  before  tlie 
enemy  nest  was  silenced. 

The  spent  troops  of  the  Sixtieth  were  stopped  half  way  across 
Bois  de  la  Pultiere  and  efforts  to  go  farther  were  futile.  Every 
patrol  seeking  to  filter  forward  was  enfiladed.  It  apj)eai-e(l  that  tlie 
Third  Division,  which  was  to  advance  and  occupy  the  woods  Clairs 
Chenes,  east  of  Bois  des  Rappes,  had  not  come  up.  The  Sixtieth 
could  not  effect  liaison  with  them. 

The  only  possible  action  for  the  troops  of  both  brigades  was  to 
dig  in,  to  hold  the  hard-won  two  kilometers  and  to  get  a  little  pro- 
tection from  the  drum  fire  that  swept  the  whole  area.  Enemy 
balloons  north  of  Bantheville  and  east  of  the  Meuse  were  undisturbed 
in  their  direction  of  the  fire  of  the  big  German  guns  that  played 
continuously  on  the  Division.  The  day  was  bright  and  clear  and  ob- 
servation was  easy.  The  shells  wrought  havoc  with  the  rear  echelons 
in  the  Bois  de  Cunel,  Bois  de  Beuge,  Bois  des  Ogons,  Ferine  de  la 
Madeleine,  and  even  in  Nantillois  and  jNIontfaucon.  The  fire  seemed 
to  come  down  at  right  angles  to  the  Cunel-Nantillois  road  from  across 
the  river,  and  a  battery  of  our  15o's  was  faced  to  the  east  to  reply 
to  the  bombardment.     A  shell  struck  the  Division  Signal  Dump  at 


"•'-    ■  '««■'  ■•■''*'») .v\~-  '■■* 

iz-j  '. k. > vtik a- sum iM-       &  ■  -*    Sri  \i       '-  \  "iV-t-Wi^'^      •    ^ 


Bethincnurt,  near  Dead  Man's  Hill.  Rather  the  location  of  the  once-upon-a-time 
Bethincoiirt.  The  Division  Field  Hospital  tvas  located  here  during  the  attacks  on 
Bois  des  Rappes  and  the  territory  to  the  north  and  east,  and  received  several  visits 

from  Boche  bombers. 


Winning  the  Bois  dcs  Rappes  151 

Septsarges  and  destroyed  it,  despite  the  heroic  work  of  the  Ammuni- 
tion Train  to  save  it. 

So  the  afternoon  was  spent  in  organizing  the  dearly  won  Unes, 
in  connecting  shell-hole  to  shell-hole  by  shallow  scooped-out  trenches. 
Patrols  felt  out  the  enemy  whose  resistance  never  slackened.  The 
ridge  that  ran  westward  from  Bois  des  Rappes,  just  north  of  Hill 
271  and  separated  from  it  by  an  open  swale,  sheltered  Boche  infan- 
try and  the  usual  clustered  machine  guns.  Three  times  that  after- 
noon these  forces  counterattacked  savagely  and  three  times  the 
Eleventh  Infantry  drove  them  back.  These  opjjonents  were  the 
famous  Twenty-eighth  "Flying  Shock  Division,"  which  had  been 
thrown  into  the  line  to  stop  the  Americans  at  Belleau  AVood  in  June. 
On  the  left,  where  due  to  the  concentrated  resistance  from  the  vicinity 
of  Romagne,  Major  INIcLean's  battalion  (1/6)  had  come  up  on 
Major  Leonard's  right  (III  6)  and  Major  Hodges  (II/6)  had  sent 
three  of  his  companies  to  protect  the  left  flank  where  the  Thirty- 
second  Division  had  not  advanced  their  right,  the  resistance  Avas 
wliolly  machine  gun  and  artillery  fire.  Until  Romagne  was  taken 
in  mid-afternoon  our  left  flank  was  held  back  by  the  stream  of  lead 
coming  from  the  ravine  east  of  the  town.  Its  fall  permitted  the  line 
to  pass  over  the  ravine  and  connect  up  with  the  adjoining  troops 
northwest  of  Romagne — only,  however,  by  retaining  Major  Hodges' 
men  in  line.  There  was  ever  steady  play  of  machine  guns  from  Bois 
de  Chauvignon,  northwest  of  Romagne,  which  it  was  utterly  impos- 
sible for  our  troops  to  reach.  The  Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Bat- 
talion from  its  positions  in  northern  Bois  de  Cunel  poured  thousands 
of  rounds  into  that  wood,  but  the  Boche  were  still  there.  Enemy 
airplanes  flew  low  over  our  lines  at  times  and  swept  them  with  their 
guns.  Our  artillery  poured  destructive  fire  into  Bantheville  and  Bois 
des  Rappes  endeavoring  to  make  our  lines  on  the  unsheltered  ridge 
more  tenable.  The  Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  moved  up 
liehind  the  Tenth  Brigade  and  took  positions  to  protect  its  flanks. 

Our  men  lay  in  the  shell-holes  scattered  over  the  entire  area  of 
advance.  The  battalions  were  sorely  diminished.  The  intense  shell- 
fire  and  barrages  had  inflicted  casualties  that  for  the  day's  fighting 
surpassed  the  thousand  mark.  Our  fighters  were  not  alone  as  heroes. 
The  medical  men  accompanied  the  assault  waves  and  worked  every 
minute  administering  first  aid  and  getting  the  seriously  wounded  to 
the  rear.  Litter  bearers  were  scarce,  for  often  the  men  detailed  to 
carry  them  forgot  their  assignments  and  rushed  into  the  hand-to- 
hand  fighting  against  the  Boche.  The  regimental  chaplains  were 
constantly  passing  in  and  out  of  the  front  lines,  too,  encouraging  the 


a; 


1= 

53 


Winning  the  Bois  des  Rappcs  153 

liard-beset  doughhoys,  aiding  the  sufferers  and  supervising  the  re- 
moval and  hin-ial  of  the  dead.  The  motor  anihuhmces  ran  over  the 
shell-swept  roads  at  top  s])eed  carrying  the  wounded  from  Ferme  de 
la  Madeleine  l)aek  to  the  hospital  at  lietliineourt.  One  driver  with  a 
load  of  wounded  had  his  gast)line  feed  pipe  l)roken  by  the  shell-tire. 
He  promptly  had  the  orderly  with  him  drain  gas  from  the  tank  into 
his  mess  cup  and  supply  the  carburetor  until  the  ambulance  could  be 
driven  to  a  place  of  safety.  Few,  indeed  were  tliere  of  all  the  men 
who  entered  the  battle  that  briglit  ()etol)er  day  but  proved  their 
heroic  metal  and  gloriously  sustained  the  honor  of  the  Red  Diamond. 
Units  were  scattered,  but  it  was  because  men  rushed  to  help 
strengthen  a  thinned  line  furthci-  on.  (xrouud  gained  was  held  from 
Komagne  to  Bois  de  la  I'ultiere. 

Headquarters  of  the  two  brigades  had  moved  an  liour  after  tlie 
assault  began  from  Xantillois  to  Ferme  de  la  Madeleine.  The  Sig- 
nal Corps  men  were  l)usy  constantly  running  the  lines  and  ])ushing 
the  wires  to  the  points  of  farther  adxanee.  I'ractically  without  in- 
terruption throughout  the  entire  fighting.  Generals  Malone  and  Cast- 
ner  had  telephone  communication  with  their  battalion  commanders  in 
the  front  lines,  despite  the  incessant  slielling.  Prisoners  were  not 
taken  in  large  mmibers.  i\t  noon  there  were  ten  at  Brigade  head- 
quarters. They  represented  units  of  three  divisions,  the  Third 
Guards,  the  Famous  Twenty-eighth,  and  the  I'J.'Jrd  Saxons,  wlio  had 
been  rushed  to  oppose  the  Fifth  Division  at  St.  Mihiel. 

The  Ninth  Brigade  made  another  strenuous  ett'ort  to  take  Bois 
de  la  Pultiere  and  Bois  des  Rappes  after  Romagne  fell.  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Peyton's  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth  was  reported  to  have  pene- 
trated the  southern  edges  of  Clairs  Chenes  wood.  Major  Davis' 
battalion  had  been  so  reduced  that  its  men  were  used  only  as  carriers. 
The  Sixty-first,  following  behind  the  Tenth  Brigade  and  at  the  same 
time  keeping  its  rear  battalion  in  liaison  with  the  Sixtieth  had  already 
thrown  its  forces  into  the  front  line.  The  second  battalion  was  in 
reserve  behind  the  Sixth,  the  thirfl  battalion  behind  the  Eleventh  and 
the  first  battalion  was  aiding  the  Sixtieth.  General  Castner  put 
Colonel  Wise's  entire  regiment,  the  Sixty-first,  in  support  of  the  Six- 
tieth in  its  renewed  attack.  At  4  p.  m.  with  some  artillery  prepara- 
tion Colonel  Hawkins  threw  his  decimated  forces  against  the  hidden 
enemy  again.  Patrols  reached  I'ultiere's  northern  edges,  but  could 
not  penetrate  Rappes.  The  lines  were  established  about  three  hun- 
dred meters  from  the  northern  edges  of  Bois  de  la  Pultiere  for  the 
night. 


151.  Ilistorij  of  the  Fifth  Dix-ision 

The  whole  Division  was  in  tlie  line,  yet  a  check  on  the  men  that 
were  actually  present  indicated  tiiat  the  effective  strength  was  hardly 
that  ot*  a  hrigade.  The  two  brigatles  had  lost  twenty-nine  otlicci's 
killed.  Captains  Stewart  D.  Bubbell  and  George  Sackett,  First 
Lieutenant  Cedric  II.  Shaw  and  Second  Lieutenants  Leo  P.  JVIc- 
Naniara,  Charles  A.  Duffy  and  Victor  K.  D.  Elakely  of  the  Eleventh 
Infantry  had  given  their  lives.  Captain  Kdward  AV.  Leonard  and 
Second  Lieutenants  Jack  S.  Allison,  Noble  G.  Ross,  Fred  Marek, 
lienjamin  Sewaski  and  Harold  Craig  of  the  Sixth  had  fallen.  The 
Fifteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  had  lost  Captain  Davis  Kossell 
and  First  Lieutenant  Solomon  iNIarcovitz  and  Josephus  B.  AVilson, 
First  Lieutenant  Stuart  L.  Marlow  and  Second  Lieutenants  Charles 
A.  Wagner,  Efton  M.  James,  and  Roy  H.  Trezavant  of  the  Sixty- 
first  had  been  killed.  The  Sixtieth  had  suffered  the  most,  losing  ten 
officers:  First  Lieutenants  Rodney  W.  Polack  and  Lewis  IVI.  Thune 
and  Second  Lieutenants  James  E.  Akers,  John  T.  Brandt,  Walter 
Clementz,  Earl  E.  Rahn,  Herbert  Clarkson,  Judson  G.  Martell, 
James  C.  N.  Richardson  and  Slater  Vollentine.  Of  the  twenty-four 
officers  who  had  gone  over  the  tojJ  that  morning  in  Lieutenant  Colonel 
Peyton's  battalion  only  foiu'  remained  uninjured  at  nightfall.  There 
were  but  eleven  sergeants  still  with  tliat  hard-handled  battalion  of 
the  Sixtieth.  The  triage  hospital  had  received  that  day  ten  officers 
and  466  men.  INIany  of  the  fifty-three  officers  and  493  men  admitted 
on  the  loth  were  casualties  on  tlie  14th.  Other  wounded  men  passed 
through  the  evacuation  system  of  the  Third  Division.  There  was  a 
far  larger  number  of  slightly  wounded  who  refused  to  quit  their  posts. 
Probably  three  hundred  of  our  men  had  been  killed,  and  many  were 
lost  or  mixed  with  other  organizations. 

The  attack  on  Bois  des  Rajjpes  was  ordered  to  l)e  continued  at 
7:30  A.  M.  of  the  15th.  Reorganization  of  the  groups  of  the  Sixtieth, 
scattered  in  the  mazes  of  Pultiere,  was  begun  in  the  darkness  and 
rain,  that  had  once  more  come  to  our  discomfort  and  difficulties.  It 
was  8  o'clock  before  the  formations  were  effected  and  the  assault 
launched.  On  the  left  of  the  Sixtieth,  the  Sixty-first  attacked  with 
its  first  battalion,  third  in  support  and  second  in  reserve. 

The  comliined  efforts  of  the  Sixtieth  and  Sixty-first  drove  the 
Boche  from  out  Pultiere;  machine  gunners  were  slain;  there  were  few 
prisoners.  Then  from  across  the  clearing  between  the  two  woods 
came  the  avalanche  of  bullets  from  the  Boche  guns  in  Bois  des 
liappes.  Our  artillery  barrage  had  fallen  a  little  l^eyond  the  southern 
edge  of  the  wood.  Much  of  oiu'  fire  was  ineffective  because  of  the 
shells  bursting  among  the  higher  branches  of  the  thick  trees.     The 


Winning  the  Bois  des  Rappes  155 

delay  of  half  an  hour  in  the  assault  caused  the  advancing  infantry  to 
lose  the  traveling  barrage,  which  had  begun  promptly  at  7:30  a.  m. 
Colonel  Wise  reported  his  front  lines  a  kilometer  and  half  behind 
the  artillery  fire.  Accordingly  the  barrage  was  stopped;  the  heavies 
were  turned  loose  on  Bois  des  Rappes  and  a  curtain  of  harassing  fire 
was  thrown  on  tlie  edge  of  the  woods.  Gradually  small  parties  of 
the  fighting  groups  filtered  into  the  wood.  Twenty-two  prisoners 
were  taken  by  the  Sixty-first  in  the  close  fighting.  One  prisoner 
stated  that  there  was  a  counter  attack  bv  the  entire  armv  forminu". 

At  noon  the  patrols  had  not  succeeded  in  doing  moi-e  than  enter 
the  edges  of  the  wood.  From  Rappes'  westei'ii  borders  machine  guns 
were  still  playing  on  the  Eleventh  Infantry  in  tlieir  open  positions 
on  Hill  271,  where  Second  lieutenant  Welty  A.  Miller  was  slain 
that  day.  At  12:30  a  box  barrage  was  drop])cd  on  tlie  western, 
northern  and  eastern  portions  of  the  woods.  The  Ninth  Brigade  was 
enabled  to  push  on  a  little.  As  the  patrols  filtered  further  into  the 
Avood  the  box  was  gradually  lifted  to  insure  them  safety.  The  three 
battalions  of  the  Sixtieth  were  combined  as  one.  with  'Major  Davis 
commanding  the  left  and  INIajor  Baldwin  the  right.  In  tlie  Sixty- 
first  the  first  and  second  battalions  were  abreast  with  the  third  just 
l)ehind.  By  2  o'clock  small  ])ortions  of  the  second  battalion  of  the 
Sixty-first  had  reached  the  nortliern  border  of  the  woods,  while  j^arts 
of  the  other  two  battalions  had  gained  the  western  edge.  As  our 
men  fought  they  saw  occasionally  carrier  pigeons  rise  from  the  Ger- 
man positions  ahead  and  wing  their  way  to  the  northward.  The 
accurate  barrage  that  immediately  followed  indicated  that  the  enemy 
was  using  the  birds  to  keep  their  artillery  informed  of  the  location  of 
our  troops.  The  Boche  stayed  there,  in  trees,  in  bushes,  in  hidden 
emplacements,  and  they  did  not  desert  tlieir  posts  or  give  up  tamely. 

INIajor  James  D.  Rivet  fouglit  at  the  head  of  his  battalion,  wiped 
out  single-handed  a  machine  gun  nest  and  then  dispatched  a  Boche 
sni])er  hidden  in  a  tree.  AVliilc  charging  up  a  path  covered  by  en- 
emy rifles.  Major  Rivet  fell.  The  Sixty-first  lost  also  Second  Lieu- 
tenant Clarence  Wood.  Captain  Geoi-ge  X.  ^Nlunro  of  the  ^Military 
Police  brought  up  a  hundred  men  who  had  become  lost  from  their 
commands,  and  when  he  was  unable  to  find  their  organizations  he 
organized  the  men  into  a  company,  using  his  five  INI.  P.'s  as  noncoms. 
Captain  Munro  joined  in  the  attack  and  led  his  men  on  until  he  was 
killed  by  the  machine  gun  fire  ahead. 

Erroneous  reports  reached  headquarters  that  nearly  all  the  of- 
ficers were  killed  and  that  the  fragments  of  the  patrols  were  with- 
drawing.   Every  effort  to  send  further  patrols  forward  to  investigate 


156  History  of  tJie  Fifth  Division 

was  held  up.  To  the  machine  gun  and  sniper  fire  the  enemy  added  a 
heavy  artillery  barrage  which  made  the  routes  unapproachable.  Of 
the  Sixtieth  only  Major  Baldwin  and  eight  of  the  seventy-eight  men 
with  Avhom  he  had  started  out  reached  the  north  edge  of  the  wood. 
There  he  found  half  a  hundred  of  the  men  of  the  Sixty-first  in  little 
grou]:)s.     Clairs  Chenes  was  still  held  by  the  enemy  in  force. 

The  report  of  Colonel  Wise  that  his  men  had  withdrawn  seemed, 
therefore,  to  be  the  true  situation.  Every  messenger  that  the  foi'ces 
in  the  wood  tried  to  send  back  \\as  stopped  by  the  lurking  snipers  or 
lost  himself  in  the  jungles  and  darkness.  Throughout  the  night  the 
lonely  forces  waited,  surroimded  on  all  sides  by  the  enemy,  their 
presence  unknown  to  their  regiments.  On  hearing  that  the  ]:)atrols 
were  being  driven  back,  General  Castner  had  immediately  directed 
that  the  troops  be  re-formed  and  pushed  again  to  the  northern  edge 
of  Bois  des  Rappes,  to  dig  in  and  hold  at  all  costs.  General  ^Ic- 
Mahon,  the  Division  Commander,  however,  in  person  directed  that 
no  fiu'ther  attempt  be  made  to  ad\ance  that  day.  but  that  the  Ninth 
Brigade  should  be  reorganized  in  the  vicinity  of  Cunel  with  the  line 
of  observation  on  the  northern  edge  of  Bois  de  la  Pultiere. 

The  Sixty-first  Infantry  relieved  the  Sixtieth,  which  moved  l)ack 
to  the  Bois  de  Cunel  and  went  into  a  support  position.  Reorganiza- 
tion of  the  Sixty-first  was  eff^ected  during  the  night.  Provisional 
groups  were  formed.  About  12.5  men  inidei-  Captain  Stark  held  an 
advance  line  along  the  northern  border  of  Pultiere;  Captain  Olm- 
stead  held  a  resistance  line  with  about  a  hundred  men  in  the  middle  of 
the  woods,  while  Ijieutenant  Colonel  ]\IcClure  formed  a  reserve  line 
in  the  trenches  south  of  Cunel,  where  lost  men  were  reorganized  and 
dispatched  to  the  front.  The  Sixth  and  Eleventh  had  remained 
throughout  the  day  on  their  lines:  the  capture  of  the  Bois  des  l?appes 
was  a  necessary  preliminary  to  any  fm-ther  advance.  The  engineer 
com])anies  tliat  had  lieen  in  the  first  day's  fighting  had  been  with- 
drawn to  the  reserve.  Company  A  of  the  Fifteenth  Machine  Gun 
Battalion  had  gone  to  the  su])port  of  the  Sixtieth  Infantry,  while  the 
other  companies  of  the  battalion  were  in  position,  generally  right  up 
with  the  front-line  infantry  along  the  ridge  from  Romagne  to  Pul- 
tiere. Reorganization  of  tlie  Tenth  Brigade  had  been  accomplished 
and  the  troops  had  spent  the  daA'  digging  in  under  the  drizzling  rain. 

No  new  attack  was  ordered  for  Octol)er  IGth.  Consolidation  of 
the  positions  was  to  be  continued  with  organization  in  de])th.  The 
Boche  were  also  working  north  of  Banthexille  and  Aincreville,  devel- 
oping the  Freya  Stellung.  They  were  not,  however,  withdrawing  at 
any  point  on  our  front.     Om-  patrols  were  constantly  in  contact  with 


Winning  the  Bois  des  Rappes  157 

the  enemy.  Early  in  the  morning  three  strong  combat  patrols  went 
forward  from  the  Sixty-first  to  reconnoiter  Bois  des  Rappes.  Ovei'- 
coming  isolated  snipers  and  machine  gminers,  their  advance  revealed 
the  presence  of  the  parties  who  had  ])enetrated  the  wood  the  day  be- 
fore. Runners  brought  back  at  10:.-J0  a.  ii.  to  General  Castner  the 
news  that  his  men  on  the  north  border  of  the  woods  were  still  in  ex- 
istence. Permission  was  seciu'ed  from  the  Division  Commander  to 
hold  Bois  des  Rappes  as  the  front  instead  of  Bois  de  la  Pultiere, 
which  had  been  ordered  the  night  before,  and  a  force  was  immediately 
dispatched  to  reinforce  these  advanced  groups.  But  the  men  had 
already  started  back  on  the  previous  day's  orders  which  they  had  just 
received,  and  before  the  relief  was  under  way  these  units  were  arriv- 
ing in  the  Pultiere  lines.  Major  Baldwin  and  lieutenants  Rex  E. 
Enochs  and  Otha  K.  Morrison  of  the  Sixtieth  and  Captain  F.  O. 
Schmidt  and  Tjieutenants  J.  E.  Cole  and  T>.  B.  Rock  of  the  Sixty- 
first  reported  back  with  half  a  luuidred  men. 

Orders  were  issued  for  the  relief  of  the  Nintli  Brigade  by  the 
Eleventh  Infantry.  The  reconquest  of  Bois  des  Rappes  was  not 
undertaken,  therefore,  by  the  reduced  forces  of  the  Sixty-first  in  the 
few  hours  of  daylight  previous  to  their  relief,  because  of  their  worn- 
out  condition  and  on  account  of  tlie  uncertainty  it  would  cause  in  the 
front  lines  to  he  relieved  that  night.  So  at  dark  the  third  battalion 
of  the  Eleventh  moved  from  its  support  position  and  took  over  the 
northern  edge  of  Bois  de  la  Pultiere;  the  second  ])attalion  of  the  Sixth 
occupied  the  entire  former  sector  of  the  Tenth  Brigade,  extending  its 
lines  to  the  right  and  taking  over  the  front  held  by  the  second  bat- 
talion of  the  Eleventh,  wliich,  reduced  to  a  mere  fragment  of  its  for- 
mer self  by  the  terrific  fighting,  moved  back  to  the  reserve.  INIajors 
McLean  and  Leonard  of  the  Sixtli  were  both  wounded  and  had  to 
relinquish  command  of  their  battalions.  First  Lieutenant  Almeron 
W.  Shanklin  and  Second  I^ieutenant  William  R.  Royer  of  the 
Eleventh  had  been  killed.  The  first  battalion  of  the  Sixth,  now 
under  Captain  Reiser,  took  over  the  support  line  in  the  Mamelle 
trenches,  while  the  third  battalion  under  Lieutenant  Hartman  went 
into  Bois  de  Cunel  as  reserve.  The  first  battalion  of  the  Eleventh  in 
support  of  its  sector  moved  into  the  German  trenches  south  of  Cunel 
and  the  second  went  into  reserve  in  the  west  part  of  Bois  des  Ogons. 
The  Fifty-eighth  Infantry  was  returned  to  the  Fourth  Division. 

The  battered  and  worn-out  units  of  the  Ninth  Brigade  made 
their  way  through  the  shell-swept  zone  back  to  the  rear  areas  for  re- 
organization and  rest.  The  Sixtieth  moved  on  the  17th  from  Bois  de 
Cunel  to  Bois   de  Montfaucon  and    Sixtv-first  went  into  Bois  de 


£i>.frJS^>Jg*VJ 


Winning  the  Boi.s  dcs  liappcs  159 

Beuge,  west  of  Nantillois.  A  check  of  the  Sixty-first  on  tlie  18th 
showed  its  casualties  for  the  week  past  to  l)e  nearly  a  thousand.  Ten 
officers  and  132  enlisted  men  were  killed.  Thirty-seven  officers  and 
839  men  were  wounded.  Only  two  comijanies  were  commanded  hy 
the  officers  who  took  them  into  the  fight.  Two  hattalion  commanders 
were  casualties:  Major  Rivet,  killed,  and  Captain  Glasgow, 
wounded — and  only  one  hattalion  adjutant  remained.  Accurate  re- 
ports of  the  Sixtieth  showed  that  44  officers  and  914  men  were  casu- 
alties. Twelve  officers  were  killed  and  32  were  wounded.  Of  the 
enlisted  men  94  were  killed,  .510  wounded  and  310  missing.  The 
bodies  of  many  of  the  men  reported  missing  were  afterwards  dis- 
covered in  policing  the  area.  There  was  no  accurate  check  on  the 
prisoners  the  brigade  had  taken,  because  many  had  been  turned  over 
to  the  Military  Police  of  the  Third  Division,  who  held  the  support 
lines  in  rear  of  and  on  right  of  the  brigade. 

Ill 

October  17th  was  spent  in  solidifying  the  front.  A  battalion  of 
the  Seventh  Infantry  was  relieved  in  the  eastern  edge  of  Bois  de  la 
Pultiere  and  firm  liaison  was  establislied  with  the  Third  Division. 
The  front  was  the  same  as  estaljlislied  on  the  l.jtli — along  the  northern 
border  of  Pultiere,  over  Hills  271  and  2(30  and  along  the  ridge  to 
Romagne,  where  connection  was  made  with  the  Thirty-second  Divi- 
sion. Here  Company  D  of  the  Engineers,  Captain  .Joseph  Laracy, 
commanding,  had  constructed  a  bridge  across  tlie  Andon  on  the  Kith. 
The  town  and  bridge  site  were  in  full  view  of  the  enemy  on  his  domi- 
nating heights,  and  the  construction  was  carried  out  under  the  now 
customary  shell  storm.  Material  was  removed  from  neighboring 
buildings,  carried  piece  by  piece  to  the  stream  and  ])uilt  into  a  solid 
wagon  bridge  by  men  unmindful  of  shells  bursting  everywhere.  The 
work  was  entirely  that  of  the  Seventh  Engineers.  In  addition  the 
Engineers  were  laying  out  a  system  of  defense  and  wiring  in  our 
lines.  A  line  of  resistance  on  either  side  of  the  Cunel-Xantillois  road 
was  completely  wired  on  the  night  of  the  Ifith  and  the  next  night  the 
outpost  system  was  solidly  strung.  That  day  the  Eleventh  Infantry 
had  completed  the  mopping  up  of  Bois  de  la  Pultiere,  taking  eighteen 
prisoners  in  the  hunt  from  bush  to  bush  and  tree  to  tree. 

Reports  from  the  Thirty-second  Division  were  that  tliey  had 
advanced  in  Bois  de  Bantheville  iniopposed  and  liad  found  no  Boche 
in  the  neighborhood  of  Bantheville.  Patrols  sent  by  Major  Hodges 
down  the  Andon  valley  to  enter  and  exploit  the  town,  however,  en- 


160  History  of  the  Fifth  Dividon 

countered  very  alert  enemy  machine  <)uns  in  the  .south  end  of  the 
village.  So  oiu-  artillery  continued  to  l)oml)ard  Bantheville  and  Bois 
des  Rappes.  The  enemy's  fire  gradually  diminished  as  our  attacks 
suhsided.  and  it  was  noted  that  a  large  num])er  of  his  shells  were 
duds — failed  to  explode. 

Nevertheless  the  17th  day  of  October  was  a  most  important  day 
for  the  Fifth  Division,  despite  the  (|uiet  in  the  lines.  The  Com- 
mander-in-Chief of  the  American  forces  was  exercising  a  close 
personal  supervision  of  the  operations  from  Meuse  to  Argonne  and 
on  that  day  sent  to  the  Red  Diamond  a  leader  famous  for  his  energy 
and  initiative,  well  able  to  carry  to  a  successful  completion  the  mis- 
sion of  the  Division.  General  McMahon  was  relieved  from  command 
and  assigned  to  the  Forty-first  Division.  Succeeding  him  came 
Major  General  Hanson  E.  Ely  from  the  Second  Division.  General 
Ely  was  a  veteran  in  the  A.  E.  F.,  having  commanded  with  marked 
distinctioji  the  Twenty-eighth  Infantry  in  that  early  period  of  the 
First  Division's  trench  fighting  "nfirthwest  of  Toul"  and  later  in  the 
operations  west  of  Montdidier  and  in  the  crucial  battle  of  Cantigny. 
At  St.  INIihiel.  Soissons  and  Blanc  Mont  Massif  he  bad  commanded 
the  Third  Brigade  of  the  Second  Division.  General  Ely  knew  well 
the  strategy  of  the  warfare  being  waged  against  the  stubbornly  with- 
draM'ing  Germans;  he  knew  the  capability  of  men  and,  best  of  all,  he 
had  the  power  of  co-ordinating  his  forces  and  using  them  where  action 
meant  victory. 

The  morning  of  the  18th  dawned  clear.  American  airplanes 
scouted  the  lines  and  effectively  kept  enemy  avions  away.  Efforts  to 
take  Bois  des  Rappes  were  renewed,  but  without  a  direct  attack. 
General  Ely  gave  instructions  that  all  ground  to  the  front  reached 
by  patrols  would  be  held,  with  the  aid  of  reinforcements,  if  necessary, 
sent  to  esta])lish  the  line.  Reconnoitering  parties  were  pushed  up  to 
the  hostile  lines,  but  every  effort  to  infiltrate  was  checked.  The 
patrols  dug  in  at  the  edge  of  Bois  des  Rappes,  subjected  to  enfilading 
fire  from  Clairs  Chenes.  The  enemy  was  securely  organized  in  the 
two  woods  and  his  flanks  could  not  be  tiu'ned.  Heavy  fire  by  our 
artillery  did  nothing  to  loosen  the  Roche's  hold  on  the  woods  and  the 
Eleventh  hammered  in  vain  against  the  strongholds. 

Reports  came  again  from  the  Thirty-second  on  om-  left  that  their 
troops  had  occu])ied  Bois  de  Bantheville  and  that  their  ])atrols  had 
gone  a]nK)st  into  Bantheville  and  found  the  town  empty  of  Crermans. 
Our  patrols,  eager  to  bring  up  the  lines  to  Bantheville  as  soon  as  pos- 
sible, ventured  all  through  the  Andon  valley,  clear  to  the  Bois  de 
Bantheville.  a  kilometer  west  of  the  stream.     The  Sixth  met  the  en- 


Winniny  the  Bois  des  Ruppea  161 

emv's  machine  gun  resistance  in  Bantheville,  and  further  found  that 
the  troops  of  the  Thirty-second  Division  had  not  been  able  to  clean  up 
the  eastern  and  northern  portions  of  Bois  de  Bantheville.  Their 
jjatrols  had  been  driven  in  and  they  were  not  holding  north  of  Bois 
de  Chauvignon.  One  of  jNIajor  Hodges'  patrols  dug  in  at  a  point 
three  hundred  meters  south  of  Bantheville.  Another  established  it- 
self on  the  hill  a  kilometer  southwest  of  the  village,  while  a  third 
located  itself  on  the  slope  six  or  seven  hundred  meters  southeast  of 
the  town.  General  Malone's  plan  to  send  Lieutenant  Ilartman's 
battalion  west  into  Bois  de  Bantheville  to  attack  the  town  from  the 
west  could  not  be  carried  out  until  the  Thirty-second  made  good  their 
advance,  but  our  patrols  kept  Bantheville  under  close  surveillance  and 
bridged  that  gap  in  the  valley  of  the  Andon.  The  activity  of  our 
patrols  continued  throughout  the  19th,  but  no  appreciable  gains 
were  made.  One  nervy  pati-ol  crept  down  the  Andon  clear  to  Banthe- 
ville and  entrenched  in  the  southern  outskirts  of  the  village.  Patrols 
were  unable  to  penetrate  Bois  des  Rappes  nor  could  they  accomj)lish 
gains  in  the  open  fields  between  that  woods  and  Bantheville,  where 
the  sunken  road  to  Cunel  sheltered  many  of  the  enemy's  guns.  The 
enemy  shelled  all  oin-  areas  intermittently,  killing  Second  Lieutenant 
Jens.  H.  Frostholm  of  the  Fourteenth  ^Machine  Gun  Battalion. 

The  failure  of  our  small  combat  groups  to  penetrate  Bois  des 
Rappes  on  the  18th  and  again  on  the  19th  proved  that  only  a  direct 
attack  could  be  successful  in  wresting  the  woods  from  the  Hun.  Svich 
an  assault  was  planned  for  the  "iOth.  The  artillery  of  the  Fourth 
Division,  which  had  l)een  withdrawn  from  the  Corps  sector,  was 
turned  over  to  the  Fifth  Division  for  the  operation.  Effective  sup- 
port of  infantry  by  artillery  was  insured,  for  the  Division  Commander 
directed  that  all  requests  for  artillery  support  by  General  ]\Ialone 
be  granted  without  question.  Hereafter  all  calls  of  the  Tenth  Bri- 
gade for  artillery  support  would  be  answered  promptly.  The  French 
batteries  moved  forward  to  better  positions.  The  clouds  that  had 
rendered  visibility  poor  all  day  thickened  and  it  began  raining  again 
in  the  evening.  All  our  troops  that  had  dug  in  on  the  edges  of  Bois 
des  Rappes  were  stealthily  withdrawn  under  cover  of  darkness  to 
permit  our  artillery  to  smash  completely  the  Boche  defenses  in  the 
southern  part  of  the  wood.  The  third  battalion  of  the  Eleventh, 
under  Major  Birmingham,  occupied  the  jumping-off  line. 

Fifteen  minutes'  concentration  of  high-explosive  from  every 
gun  of  the  Fourth  and  l.j.jth  Artillery  Brigades  covered  the  woods 
and  then  suddenly  lifted  as  the  doughboys  charged  the  enemy.  Three 
companies  were  in  the  van,  with  the  fourth  company  following  as 


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friiniiiii/  I  hi-  Bois  dcs  liappes  163 

moppers-up.  The  Third  Division  was  attacking  C'lairs  Chencs  at 
the  same  instant.  The  assault  struck  hard  hut  the  lioche  had  em- 
ployed his  three  days'  possession  of  the  wood  well;  he  was  fixed  there. 
Only  incli  hy  inch,  as  it  were,  did  Major  Birmingham's  men  crowil 
the  enemy  hack.  The  left  and  center  entered  the  forest  and  passed 
the  rifle-pits  they  had  held  the  day  before,  but  the  right  could  not 
penetrate  at  all.  The  Third  Division  was  cleaning  up  C'lairs  Chenes 
and  reached  its  northern  extremity  on  the  east,  although  the  western 
edges  still  hekl  out.  Fire  from  hidden  machine  gims  in  a  gully  be- 
tween the  two  woods  covered  the  whole  area  and  prevented  advance 
in  eastern  Rajjpes  and  western  Clairs  Chenes.  Prisoners  reported 
that  there  was  a  i-egiment  in  each  area,  witli  a  third  regiment  in 
reserve  at  Aincreville.  ^Vll  the  German  companies  were  heavily 
armed  with  machine  guns. 

As  on  the  1.5th,  the  heavy  growth  of  trees  reduced  the  effective- 
ness of  our  barrage.  Major  Muncaster,  who  had  moved  his  reserve 
battalion  up  to  Bois  de  la  Pultiere,  pushed  his  forces  up  to  add 
weight  to  iSIajor  Birmingham's  thrust,  but  the  Germans,  still  superior 
in  numbers,  held  their  lines  impregnably  against  our  s])ent  troops. 
Even  the  2)resence  of  the  first  battalion  under  Captain  Harris,  who 
had  succeeded  Major  Mahin,  failed  to  improve  the  situation.  The 
regiment  reached  a  northwest  horn  of  the  woods  and  held  a  line  about 
two  hundred  meters  inside  the  l)order  of  the  wood.  About  0  o'clock 
in  the  evening  the  efforts  to  advance  were  discontinued,  the  troops 
dug  in  for  the  night  and  prepared  to  strike  again  on  the  morrow. 
Two  more  officers  of  the  Eleventh,  First  Lieutenant  Northfleet  S. 
Smith  and  Second  Fieutcnant  Patrick  J.  Cummings,  had  lost  their 
lives.  The  Third  Divison  had  finally  succeeded  in  clearing  all  except 
the  western  fringes  of  Clairs  Chenes,  while  to  the  left  of  the  Fifth 
Division  the  Eighty-ninth  had  relieved  the  Thirty-second  and  had 
spent  the  entire  day  sti'uggling  to  clean  out  Bois  de  Bantheville. 

Six  days  of  fighting  had  failed  to  concjuer  Bois  des  Rappes. 
Direct  attacks  as  well  as  infiltration  by  patrols  had  not  succeeded. 
It  was  evident  that  only  a  surprise  attack  could  force  the  enemy  to 
give  up  the  place.  Major  Muncaster  took  command  of  the  P^leventh 
on  the  21st,  as  Colonel  Bennet  had  received  his  promotion  to  Briga- 
dier General,  and  Lieutenant  Colonel  Binford  had  been  evacuated  to 
the  hospital.  Major  Muncaster  was  familiar  with  all  the  lioche 
strong  points  in  the  woods  and  knew  the  situation  intimately.  He 
took  charge  of  a  surprise  attack,  to  be  launched  squai-ely  to  the  front. 
Fortunately  the  rolling  kitchens  reached  Pultiere  the  night  of  the 
20tli,  and  the  first  hot  food  in  a  week  revived  and  stinmlated  the  men 


161  History  of  the  Fiftli  Division 

wonderfully.  After  their  chow  the  men  of  ^Nlajor  Muncaster's  and 
Captain  Harris'  hattalions  were  stealthily  filtered  up  to  the  attaek 
line,  all  massed  well  within  that  zone  that  hostile  hai-rages  had  been 
2)ounding  for  days. 

There  was  only  five  minutes'  artillery  prejiaration.  The  75's 
shelled  the  front  lines  while  the  heavies  honiharded  the  second  and 
third  positions.  At  11:30  a.  m.  the  assault  plunged  forward  and 
literally  overwhelmed  the  Germans  in  the  front  lines.  The  surprise 
was  a  success.  The  rolling  barrage  by  the  light  artillery  swept  the 
area  and  stood  at  the  northern  edge  of  the  wood.  The  Eoche  gave 
up  in  the  hand-to-hand  fighting.  INIachine  gun  fire  almost  subsided. 
A  company  on  the  left  advanced  over  the  ridge  west  of  Rappes  and 
took  the  trenches  on  the  west  slope,  whence  the  enemy  had  so  long 
held  up  the  lines  on  Hill  271.  By  2  o'clock  the  woods  were  practically 
cleared  and  175  prisoners  had  been  taken.  They  represented  two  new 
divisions  that  had  come  to  oppose  us  since  the  fighting  on  the  14th- 
loth.  Three  jjlatoons  of  the  Seventh  Engineers  under  command  of 
First  Ivieutenant  ^Morgan  B.  McDernn)tt  had  accomjianied  the  as- 
sault with  w  ire  and  stakes  and  the  organization  of  the  hard-won  wood 
was  begun  at  once.  In  his  work  Lieutenant  INIcDermott  was  mortally 
wounded  by  machine-gun  fire  and  died  two  days  later.  The  signal 
men  had  carried  their  telephones  with  the  assaulting  infantry.  The 
very  last  reel  of  wire  was  jjut  in  the  line  and  the  field  phone  was  on 
the  end  of  it  300  meters  from  the  farthest  outpost  when  the  day  Avas 
won. 

As  had  been  expected,  the  enemy  displayed  his  intention  to 
counterattack  immediately.  The  Boche  who  had  escaped  to  Aincre- 
ville  were  forming  with  their  reserves.  But  General  ]\Ialone  had 
anticipated  even  the  place  of  the  enemy's  formation  and  the  route  of 
his  approach,  and  the  artillery  had  its  data  all  prepared  for  C.  O.  P. 
fire  on  those  areas.  At  6:20  p.  :m.  the  runner  from  the  outpost  of  the 
Eleventh  carried  to  the  phone  the  message  that  the  counterattack 
was  advancing.  At  6:23  shells  were  dropping  on  Aincreville  and 
the  valley  northeast  of  Rappes.  The  Germans  were  disorganized. 
Another  message  from  the  front,  "Recpiest  you  shift  artillery  fire 
.500  meters  to  the  east,"  was  answered  in  three  and  a  half  miruites. 
The  fire  was  transported  and  struck  the  achancing  gray  lines 
squarely.  Rifle  and  machine  gun  completed  the  shattering  of  the 
counterattack.  The  enemy  was  routed.  He  retreated  in  confusion 
leaving  us  moi-f;  prisoners.  Bois  des  Rappes  was  won  for  good  and 
solid  contact  was  made  with  the  Third  Division  on  northern  Clairs 
Chenes.     The  Eleventh  Infantrv  had  that  dav  lost  its  twelfth  officer 


Winning  the  Bois  ties  Rappes  165 

killed  by  the  enemy  since  October  13th — First  Lieutenant  Percival 
C.  Jones. 

^Vitll  Bois  (les  Rappes  taken  the  conquest  of  Bantlieville  and 
Grande  Carre  Fernie  became  a  comparatively  simple  problem.  The 
Eighty-ninth  Division  had  taken  Eois  de  Bantlieville;  so  that  the 
town  in  the  vallej'  could  not  hold  out  against  concerted  attacks  from 
the  heights  on  east  and  west.  General  ]Malone  was  prepared  to  finish 
up  the  original  task  of  the  Fifth  Division  in  short  order.  AVliile  the 
combat  in  the  woods  was  still  raging,  a  strong  patrol  from  the  Sixth 
Infantry  had  advanced  directly  to  take  Bantlieville  and  continue  on 
north  and  east,  but  could  not  go  l)eyond  the  edge  of  the  town  on 
account  of  the  superior  forces  of  infantry  and  machine  guns  there. 
Bantlieville  had  been  incorporated  as  an  outpost  of  the  Freya  Stel- 
lung,  which  the  Boche  had  developed  along  the  line  of  heights  from 
Grande  Cai-re  Ferme  eastward  above  the  Andon  Rau. 

General  Malone  secured  permission  from  the  Eighty-ninth  to 
send  his  troops  through  that  thvision's  territory  to  attack  Banthe- 
ville  from  the  west.  Our  artillery  moved  forward  to  advantageous 
positions  close  up.  The  Ele\'enth  in  Bois  des  Rappes  was  ready  and 
guides  from  the  Eighty-ninth  had  arrived  to  conduct  the  troops  of 
the  Sixth  Infantry  to  Bois  de  Bantlieville.  when  word  came  that  the 
Ninetieth  Division  would  relieve  the  Fifth  immediately.  The  attack 
had  to  be  called  off.  Six  hours  more  would  certainly  have  seen  the 
conquest  of  Bantlieville  by  our  pincer-attack  from  west  and  east. 
But  the  units  of  the  Xinetieth  were  arriving  and  the  Tenth  Brigade 
turned  over  its  lines  without  incident,  sadly  depleted  by  eight  days 
of  constant  combat.  Casualties  of  the  Tenth  Brigade  were  over  two 
thousand.  The  Eleventh  had  suffered  more  than  any  other  regiment, 
first  in  its  open  positions  on  Hills  2G0  and  271,  and  then  in  Bois  des 
Rappes.  Its  losses  Avere  12  officers  and  210  enlisted  men  killed  and 
952  men  wounded.  One  hundred  and  fifteen  officers  had  entered  the 
fight  with  the  Eleventh;  scarce  more  than  a  score  remained  miinjured 
when  relief  came;  the  Sixth  had  lost  G  officers  and  130  men  killed 
and  31  officers  and  49.5  men  wounded.  Command  of  the  sector  passed 
to  the  Commanding  General  of  the  Ninetieth  Division  at  8  A.  m.  of 
the  22nd  of  Octolier,  and  the  Sixth  and  Eleventh  withdrcAV  to  the 
zone  south  of  ]Moiitfaucon.  The  1.3.>th  Field  Artillery  Brigade  re- 
mained in  jKjsition  and  was  attached  to  the  relieving  division. 

IV 

Eleven  days  of  the  fiercest  fighting  the  Fifth  had  ever  seen  had 
won  back  eight  square  kilometers  of  French  soil.     After  our  jjatrols 


166  Hisluri)  uf  the  Fifth  Division 

had  entered  Cunel  on  the  liJtli,  it  was  the  attaek  of  the  Ninth  Brigade 
on  the  1-lth  that  eonqiiered  the  town  and  made  it  permanently  ours. 
It  was  only  with  the  aid  of  our  Engineers  that  the  division  on  our  left 
had  taken  Roniagne.  After  the  eonquest  of  Bois  de  la  Pultiere,  the 
Bois  des  Happes  had  heen  won  hy  the  Eleventh  Infantry  against 
most  determined  resistanee,  as  lieree  as  any  ever  met  hy  American 
troops — netting  the  Division  a  gain  of  three  kilometers.  Over  the 
open  ground  west  of  the  woods  the  advance  had  been  only  about  two 
kilometers,  but  just  as  the  Division  was  relieved  the  way  had  been 
opened  up  for  the  march  on  Bantheville  and  the  heights  beyond. 
Foin-  hundred  and  seventy-two  prisoners,  including  six  officers,  had 
been  captured,  while  at  least  that  many  more  Boches  had  been  killed. 
One-pounders  and  machine  guns  had  been  Avon  only  after  their  crews 
had  l)een  exterminated. 

The  intensity  of  the  lighting  is  graphically  recorded  in  the  diary 
of  a  German  officer  captured: 

"On  (October  14th,  we  were  again  sent  forward,  entering  the 
I'roiit  line  in  the  evening.  The  Americans  attacked  the  sector  of  the 
3.51st  I.  ]{.  but  were  temporarily  repulsed.  We  suffered  consider- 
able losses. 

"On  Octol)er  15th,  the  Americans  are  still  in  possession  of  the 
Bois  des  Happes  and  for  the  present  nothing  can  be  done. 

"On  October  Kitli,  tlie  lOGth  Reserve  Regiment  tried  in  vain  to 
dislodge  the  Amei-icans.  In  the  afternoon  our  positions  in  the  woods 
were  very  heavily  shelled.  I  was  almost  buried  alive.  In  the  after- 
noon our  company  in  conjunction  with  the  Second  and  Third  Com- 
panies reconnoitered  the  Bois  des  Rajjpes.  There  were  no  traces  of 
occupation. 

"On  October  17th  our  orders  to  withdraw  were  postponed.  Dur- 
ing the  night  our  rear  areas  were  heavily  shelled,  but  the  front  lines 
were  undisturbed. 

"October  18th  was  one  of  my  worst  days  in  the  war.  Beginning 
at  noon  a  barrage  which  I  could  not  have  imagined  more  intense  was 
laid  down  on  our  position.  Lt.  Hoffman  fell  ten  paces  to  my  left. 
Many  otlier  casualties  resulted.     'Further  with  God.' 

"Octo])er  19th,  my  company  was  ordered  to  move  farther  west 
and  we  were  forced  to  leave  our  newly  constructed  dugout.  On  our 
left  the  enemy  continued  his  harassing  fire." 

Thus  the  enemy  testifies  to  the  hard  attack  of  the  14th,  the  pene- 
tration of  Bois  des  Rappes  by  the  men  of  the  Ninth  Brigade  and  their 
courageous  stand  there,  the  fortification  of  the  woods  after  om-  un- 
fortunate withdrawal  and  the  severe  punishment  that  our  artillery 


Winning  tlic  Bois  des  Rappes  167 

gave  to  the  forces  that  manned  the  wood.  Bois  des  Rappes  Avas 
turned  into  a  glorious  victory,  after  a  withdrawal  due  to  misunder- 
standing of  circumstances,  and  General  Liggett,  commanding  the 
First  Army,  expressed  through  the  Corps  Commander  his  praise: 

"The  Army  Commander  directs  that  you  convey  to  the  Com- 
manding General,  officers  and  men  of  the  Fifth  Division  his  appre- 
ciation of  their  persistency  and  success  in  improving  the  line  held  by 
this  Division  by  clearing  the  Bois  des  Rappes  of  the  enemy." 

To  this  General  Hines  had  added  his  thanks.  "The  difficulties 
under  which  the  Third  Corps  has  labored  to  improve  its  position 
have  been  numerous  and  great  and  the  part  the  Fifth  Division  took 
in  establishing  the  present  advantageous  position  of  this  Corps  is 
deeply  appreciated  by  the  Corps  Commander,  and  he  adds  his  con- 
gratulations to  those  of  the  Commanding  General  of  the  Army 
for  the  vigorous  and  untiring  efforts  of  the  personnel  thereof,  whose 
resolution  and  fortitude  are  worthy  of  the  best  traditions  of  the 
American  Army." 

General  Ely  commended  the  Eleventh  Infantry  in  a  letter  to 
General  Malone,  commanding  the  Tenth  Brigade,  as  follows: 

"After  two  attacks  on  the  ]5ois  des  Rappes  had  failed,  you  were 
instructed  that  the  wood  must  be  taken.  You  chose  for  this  duty  part 
of  the  Eleventh  Infantry  under  JVIajor  Muncaster.  They  took  the 
wood;  the  losses  were  comparatively  light  and  the  number  of  prison- 
ers was  com{)arativeh'  large. 

"The  Division  Commander  desires  to  highly  commend  the  valor 
and  tenacity  of  purpose  of  the  officers  and  men  engaged.  He  fully 
appreciates  the  difficulties  under  which  the  Eleventh  Infantry  labored 
— a  large  percentage  of  replacements,  the  great  paucity  of  officers, 
due  to  losses  recently  sustained,  the  weariness  of  the  men  due  to  many 
days  and  nights  of  fighting  under  heavy  shell  and  machine-gun  fire. 
In  spite  of  all  drawbacks,  the  wood  was  taken  in  a  brilliant  charge; 
was  organized  and  held  against  the  enemy's  counterattack.  The 
Division  Commander  exjiresses  his  high  appreciation  of  the  patriot- 
ism and  valor  which  were  exhibited  by  these  troops,  extends  his  con- 
gratulations to  all  officers  and  men  engaged,  and  desires  that  this  be 
published  to  the  troops." 

One  officer  had  won  that  honor  hardest  in  the  world  to  gain,  the 
Congressional  Medal  of  Honor.  Seventeen  officers  and  fifty-two 
enlisted  men  were  awarded  the  Distinguished  Service  Cross  for  spe- 
cial acts  of  bravery  and  gallantry,  while  a  score  of  officers  and  a  hun- 
dred and  fifty  men  were  cited  in  Division  General  Orders.  The 
casualty  list,  which  is  ever  the  barometer  that  indicates  the  fierceness 


A  '  ,'■"•■   ..^v  4.;.       ^T^ 


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WliniuHj  the  Bois  dcfi  Kappcs  169 

of  the  battle,  read  4, 449,  over  20  per  eeut.  of  the  Division.  Fifty-one 
officers  and  728  men  had  given  their  hves;  l(i8  officers  and  .'i,.j()4  men 
were  wounded;  two  officers  and  27.>  men  weie  missing"  only  seven 
were  known  to  be  captured.  The  Division  v  as  sorely  in  need  of  rest. 
Durinff  those  eleven  davs  men  and  officers  alike  had  existed  under 
the  most  trying  and  wearing  conditions.  'J'hroughout  almost  all  the 
jjeriod  there  had  been  rain,  which  kept  clothing  wet  and  rendered 
the  battlefields  "seas  of  nmd."  The  chill  of  autumn  was  in  the  air 
and  the  warmth  of  a  fire  was  never  possible  in  the  open  under  the 
observation  of  the  enemy.  x\-  shelter  tent  stretched  over  a  shell-hole 
half  filled  with  water  was  all  the  protection  that  could  be  had  against 
both  artillery  and  weather.  Food  reached  the  front  lines  cold  and  in 
insufficient  quantities.  It  was  not  till  almost  the  end  of  the  opera- 
tions that  the  kitchens  could  be  brought  n\}  far  enough  to  pro\'ide  hot 
meals.  AVater  was  very  scarce  and  often  contaminated.  The  am- 
bulance dressing  stations  at  Ferme  de  la  ^Madeline,  Xantillois  and 
Septsarges  had  provided  hot  food  and  drink  for  thousands  of  men 
daily,  yet  that  was  only  a  drop  in  the  bucket.  Practically  every 
officer  and  man  was  suffering  from  diarrhea  and  exposure.  A  thou- 
sand sick  patients,  in  addition  to  the  wounded,  were  cared  for  by  the 
Triage  Hosijital  at  Bethincourt  dining  the  action.  And  even  back 
here,  in  the  shadows  of  Dead  Man's  Hill,  there  was  no  peace,  for  by 
night  there  were  visits  from  the  buzzing  (German  planes  and  bombing, 
and  by  day  the  observers  east  of  the  Meusc  could  see  the  activities  of 
our  rearmost  echelons  and  direct  their  heavy  guns  on  every  point. 

Thus,  when  the  troops  moved  back  to  the  Montfaucon-Malan- 
court  areas  after  relief  on  the  night  of  October  21st-22d,  they  were 
still  under  fire.  No  better  shelter  was  available  than  on  the  battle- 
fields. Sleep  came  to  men  lying  on  damp  ground  only  because  they 
were  utterly  exhausted.  Hot  food  in  plentiful  quantities  helped  in- 
crease the  morale  a  great  deal,  however,  and  new  clothes  made  the 
"cootie"  feeling  less  noticeable.  About  3,000  replacements  were 
received  on  the  24th.  Most  of  these  rookies  were  untrained,  many 
having  been  in  the  service  only  six  weeks  or  a  couj)le  of  months.  At- 
tempts were  made  to  give  them  hasty  instruction  in  the  use  of  rifle 
and  machine  gun,  but  the  time  was  too  short.  The  Seventh  En- 
gineers, after  fighting  as  infantry,  building  bridges  and  organizing 
positions,  were  called  upon  to  act  as  Corps  troops  in  road  construc- 
tion during  this  period  of  "rest"  and  reorganization.  They  received 
no  replacements  to  fill  up  the  losses  they  had  sustained. 


170 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ENLISTED  MEN   KILLED  IN  ACTION 
FIRST  PHASE   MEUSE-ARGONNE  OPERATION 


SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  Joseph  Haas,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Ben  C.  Roberts,  M.  G.  Co. 
•Pvt.  Samuel  Smith,  M.  G.  Co. 
♦Pvt.  Henry  G.  Taylor,  M.  G.  Co. 
*OrcI.  Sgt.  Allen  W.  Saussaman,  Sup.  Co. 
•Pfc.  Samuel  W.  GacUly,  Med.  Det. 

Pfc.  George  C.  Hammond,  Med.  Det. 

Pfc.  Vannie  Stewart,  Med,  Det. 

Pvt.  Lawrence  A.  Handel,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Roy  W.  Benjamin,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  William  R.  Hart,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  Jolm  H.  I.enon,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Alexander  Perelli,  Co.  A. 
•Pvt.  John  J.  Rossiter,  Co.  A. 

Corp.  Charles  C.  Cooch,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Thomas  E.  Crayne,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Henry  M.  Eades,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Lawrence  Harden,  Co.  H. 

Corp.  Walter  J.  High,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Adam  Hoffman,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Thomas  Routt,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Joseph    Braumbeek,   Co.   C. 

Pvt.  Michael  Epstein,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Michael  Felmy,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Andrew  J.  Furey,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Quintom  Gerbrick,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Hartin,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Fred  G.  Irons,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  James  Kriz,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  James  R.  Laughlin,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Simon  P.  Leroy,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Jeremiah  O'Brien,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Theovate  Venture,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  Lewis  O.  Beck,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Harold  Cole,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Maurice  Collins,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Jessie  Coyer,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Ray  B.  Cropp,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  Henry  Gallant,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Martin  Hansen,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Frederick  Kussmaul,  Co.  D. 

Sgt.  Charles  D.  Lundy,  Co.   D. 

Pvt.  Edward  F.  Morahan,  Co.  D 

Pvt.  Benjamin  Spitzer,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Grover  Tape,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Henry  R.  Thebes,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.   Raymond  Woods,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  A.sher  Brenner,  Co.  E. 

Pfc.   Mike  Datzko,  Co.  E. 

Corp.   Andrew  Early,  Co.  E. 

Pfc.  James  Evans,  Co.  E. 

Sgt.  Jerry  Featherstone,  Co.  E. 

Pfc.  Samuel  Harding,  Co.  E. 

(*)  Died  of  wounds. 


Pvt.  Tony  L.  Lewis,  Co.  E. 
•Pvt.  Edward  H.  Lockhart,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Raymond   McCoy,   Co.   E. 
*Pvt.  Jacar  Marvonicolas,  Co.  E, 

Pvt.  Sevastian  Mast,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Aaron   Neff,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Frank  Quiet,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.   Bernie  Stinebrook,  Co.   E. 

Sgt.  John  J.  Carey,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.  Gunthier  Clevenger,  Co.   F. 

Mech.  George  D.   Dreslin,  Co.   F. 

Pvt.   Howard  Drumheller,  Co.  F. 
•Pvt.  Calvin  Johnson,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.  I>amcelots  Olds,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  John  Vannucci,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Luigi  Adams,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Roscoe  C.  Atkins,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  George  D.  Britton,  Co.  G. 

Corp.   Raymond  P.  Cuffrey,  Co.  G. 
.    Pvt.  William  Dent,  Co.  G." 

Pvt.  Antonio  Di  Leila,  Co.  G. 

Corp.  John  F.  Dunn,  Co.  G. 

Corp.  Frank  H.  Everitt,  Co.  G. 

Corj).  Harvey  R.  McCrory.  Co.  G. 
•Pvt.  James  J.  Mahoney,  Co.  G. 

Bug.  Chester  B.  Stewart,  Co.  G. 

Corp.  Joseph  Stonage,  Co.  G. 
•Corp.  John  A.  Buhse,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Tony  Convertito,  Co.  H. 
•Pvt.  Charles  K.  Hosier,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Roy  O.  Pollard,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  John  Civitello,  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  James  Diodato,  Co.  I. 
•Pvt.  Dezeria  Duplessis,  Co.   I. 

Cor]i.  Cieorge  Fortus,  Co.   I. 

Pfc.   Russel   M.    Kinncar,   Co.    I. 

Corp.  A  rick  L.  Lore,  Co.   I. 
•Pvt.  R<ibert  McLean,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Rhen  McShane,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.   Frank  D.  Sayer,  Co.   I. 

Pvt.  Walter  T.  Sharpe,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  William  Shipp,  Co.   I. 

Pvt.  Lewis  Swick,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Jancu  Vasilc,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  John  F.  Fletcher,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Lee  W.  Hainline,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  John  P.  Hand,  Co.  K. 
■   Pvt.  Thomas  P.  Healy,  Co.  K. 

Mech.  Edward  J.  Martin,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Willie  Patterson,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Andrew  J.  Ponton,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Charles  Staucavoge,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Stiro,  Co.   K. 


Winniufj  the  Bois  dcs  Rap  pes 


171 


S I  Xr I  F/ri I    I XFA STRY—Contmued 


Pvt.  Harry  A.  Walzl.  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Robet  C.  Wilcox,  Co.  K. 
*Pvt.  Isaac  H.  Apple,  Co.  M. 
*Pfc.  Ovila  Benier,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Wilfred  L.  Binettc,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Simon  Cornell,  Co.  M. 
♦Pfc.  Charley  B.  Hall,  Co.  M. 


*Corp.  Amo.s  Honchroff,  Co.  M. 
Pvt.  Jo.sepli  Manco,  Co.  M. 
Corp.  Harold  S.  Marlowe,  Co.  M. 
Corp.  Thomas  Muldon,  Co.  M. 
Sfct.  Severt  .1.  Nelson,  Co.  M. 
Pvt.  John  Pulcinno,  Co.  M. 
Sgt.  Harold  B.  Smith,  Co.  M. 


SIXTY-FH^ST  INFANTRY 


Corp.  John  A.  Birts,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Earl  J.  Collins,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Archibald  McKay,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Christ  L.  Muench,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pfc.  Earl  H.  Oplinper,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Carl  J.  Price,  M.  G.  Co. 
•Pvt.  Russell  J.  Tenadell,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Joseph  A.  Goujon,  Sup.  Co. 

Pvt.  Otis  J.  Bailey,"  Co.  A. 
*Sgt.  Howard  Bradshaw,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Verina  Cainretta,  Co.   A. 

Pvt.  John  A.  Cannon,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  WiUiam  Cochran,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Henry  E.  Erb,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Wood  A.  Hicks,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  John  Macky,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.   Raymond  Miller,  Co.  .\. 

Pvt.  Louis  Radloff,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  Louis  Rosa,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  James  P.  Smith,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Walter  Szymanski,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  French  Cerisano,  Co.  B. 
•Pvt.  John  W.  noughcrty,  Co.  B. 
•Pvt.  Herbert  A.  Fischer,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Dayton  Fleming,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Harnois,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Samuel  R.  Hoffman,  Co.  B. 
•Pfc.  Joseph  Margis,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  Orville  Mitchell,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Bernhard   Nelson,  Co.   B. 

Pfc.  William  Sydnor,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Joseph  S.  Truman,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Emil  H.  Hoffman,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Kuznia  Koval,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  Claude  C.  Mullen,  Co.  C. 

Corp.   William  Mulraney,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Egildo  Romanclli,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Stephen  Trucik,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Charles  Bassett,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  Nicholas  Checkaris,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Virgil  Cole,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Harry  Crossley,  Co.  D. 

Sgt.  Clifton  R.  Faith,  Co.  n. 

Pvt.   Frank  McDonald,  Co.   D. 
•Pvt.   Frank   Morano,  Co.   D. 

Pvt.   Nick  Muflfa,  Co.  D. 

1st  Sgt.  Paul  C.  Rowan,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Philip  Barret,  Co.  E. 

(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


Pfc.  Theodole  Chouinard,  Co.  E. 

Corp.   Patrick  Hall.  Co.  E. 
•Pvt.  Stanley  L.  Ingram,  Co.  E. 
•Pvt.  John  Lessig,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Lee  McMullen,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Alex  Migdal.sky,  Co.  E. 

Pfc.  Stanislaw  Miller,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Morris  Rapjiarport,  Co.  E. 
•Pvt.  Charlie  Winn,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Earl  Bridgeman,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Hubert  R.  Firm,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Patrick  Flaherty,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Carl   Fleischer,  Co.   F. 

Pvt.  Martin  J.  Glendon,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Henry  J.  Keckhut,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Friend  L.  Noltc,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Boiigban   Prince,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Antonio  Ricotta,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  John  P.  Archabold,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  William  Beyer,  Co.  G. 
•Pvt.  Cieorge  B.  Hirtzel,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Richard  Ives,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  ChrLst  S.  Spathis,  Co.  G. 

Pfc.  James  Valleriani,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  George  F.   Whitson,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Andy  O.  Berg,  Co.  H. 

Corp.  Victor  H.  Roger,  Co.  H. 

Corj).  Lawrence  N.  I-und,  Co.   H. 
•Sgt.  John  W.  Miller,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Austin  Snijies,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Julian  M.   Southworth,  Co.   H. 

Pvt.  Robert  J.  Barnes,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Alassandro  Cas.selli,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Sostino  Castrigiano,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Albert   S.   Hunt,   Co.   I. 

Pvt.  Virginia  Kravitch,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  James  T.  McCabc,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  y\lbert  H.   McLaughlin,  Co.   I. 

Pvt.  Jesse  C.  Ragsdale,  Co.   I. 
•Bug.  Walter  Savello,  Co.  I. 
•Pvt.  Max  Sherman,  Co.  I. 

1st  Sgt.  Edwin  M.  Stanton,  Co.  I. 

Corp.  Charlie  I.  W.  Watson,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  William  F.  Firth,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  James  Madeen,  Co.  K. 
•Sgt.  Louis  Rose,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.   Raymond   W.  Scott,  Co.   K. 

Corp.  George  Bernhardt,  Co.  L. 


172 


Ui.storif  of  the  Fifth  Dix'isioii 


SIX  I'Y  I'lKSf    IM'  \SV\\\-(oiiliiiiic<l 


*Pvt.   Uittu-rt  V.  Charles,  Co.  L. 

IM.  Mont  K.  Combs,  Co.  I.. 

S{;t.  .laiiits  I'itzsiililxms,  Co.  L. 
•IM.   iMMiik   Miller,  Co.  I.. 

(  iirp.   l?eii  Xovjik,  Co.  L. 

I'M.  .losepli  Heilley,  Co.  L. 
*l'vt.  Jes.se  Smith,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  (lilliert  C.  Staples,  Co.  I., 

(    .1)1.  .Mm  Vestal,  Co.   I,. 

IM.  Hoy  Webb,  Co.  L. 


Pvt.  William  K.  Wcge,  Co.  L. 

Corp.   l''()ril  Wise,  Co.  I.. 

Pfc.  Clareiiee   Bocttner,  Co.   M. 

Pvt.  .lohn   Cheek,  Co.   M. 

Pvt.  Morris  Cohen,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Herbert  Eisenhart,  Co.   M. 
*Pfe.  .lohn  I..  Jaekson,  Co.  M. 

Sj!;t.  Charles  Lewis,  Co.  M. 

Corp.  Thomas  G.   MeCaiiley,  Co.   M. 
*Corp.  Harry  Newman,  Co.  M. 


Corp.   Otio  B.  Zanelti.  Co.  M. 


Pfc.  William  Amrhein,  Co. 
Sgt.  Joseph  Xavara,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  William  Smith,  Co.  U 
Pvt.   Peter  Coft'olis,  Co.  C. 


FOlfUTEEXTH  MACHINE  GUN  B.VTTAl.ION 


Spt.  .Toseph  H.  Harper,  Co.  C. 
Pfc.  Mathew  Smith,  Co.  C. 
S}rt.  John  J.  Jureiek,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  George  M.  McLaughlin,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  James  Salle,  Co.  D. 


SIXTH  INIWNTHV 


Corp.   Early  Bry.mt.  M.  G.  Co. 
Sgt.  William  K.'  DriseoU,  M.  G.  Co. 
Pvt.  Joseph  J.  Shanee.  M.  G.  Co. 
Pvt.  John  A.  MeCiough,  Med.  Det. 
Pvt.   Edward  L.  Carroll,  Co.  A. 
Corj).  Benjamin  H.  Morris,  Co.  A. 
•Pvt.  John  L.  Chadwick,  Co.  B. 
Corp.   Willi.ini   H.   Hammie,  Co.   B. 
Pfe.   Karl   W  .    llurr.  Co.   B. 
Corj).  James  .\.  Ingle,  Co.  B. 
Pfe.  Chester   Ueed,  Co.   B. 
Pvt.   M.  .\ngelo  Vagafonia,  Co.   B. 
Pvt.  Artlmr  M.  Welch.  Co.   B. 
Pvt.  Lester  Woods,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  Doy  L.  Brannon,  Co.  C. 
Pfc.  Uifey  L.  Davis,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Gladus  Gerstout,  Co.   C. 
Pvt.   William   Landers,  Co.   C. 
Sgt.   I-'erdinando  P.  Meyer,  Co.  C. 
Pfe.  John  M.  Steinbock,  Co.  C. 
Corp.  Grovcr  C.  Wells,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  James  A.   Devanie,  Co.   V). 
Corp.  John  R.  Moss,  Co.  D. 
Pfc.   Molic  Parmhy,  Co.  D. 
IM.  Jiibn  E.  Simons,  Co.  1). 
Bug.  Theodore  Troullos,  Co.  I). 
Corp.  Jesse  R.  Warren,  Co.  D. 
Pfc.  James  L.  Wylie,  Co.   D. 
Pvt.  Arthur  Cook,  Co.  E. 
Pvt.  Joseph  C.  Davis,  Co.  E. 
•Pfe.  Albert  H.  Girard,  Co.  E. 
♦Corp.   .\rtluir  J.   Hinds,  Co.   E. 
Pvt.  Christopher   Hutchinson,   Co.   E. 
Pvt.  Henry  W.  Justis,  Co.  E. 
Pvt.   Benjamin   Kidd,  Co.  E. 
Pvt.  Walter  E.  Kopcxynsky,  Co.  E. 

(*)    Died  of  wounds. 


Pvt.  Leslie  R.  I.ovan,  Co.  E. 
Pvt.  Lonie  ^'.  Marler.  Co.  E. 
Pvt.  Floyd  E.  Mooncyham,  Co.  E. 
Pvt.  Alexander  Quear.  Co.  E. 
Pvt.  Percy  H.  Samples,  Co.  E. 
Pvt.  Richard   Wright,  Co.   E. 
Pvt.  Ancc  Evans,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Cordus  E.  Gainblin,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.   Rigcria  Moseardello,  Co.  F. 
Corp.  James  H.  Pergram,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Otis  Sharp,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Horace  C.  Anderson,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Peter  Cines,  Co.  G. 
Sgt.  Mathey  Conway,  Co.  G. 
•Pvt.  Saffron  Garmolinsky,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  John  Gratinik,  Co.  G. 
Mech.  Jacob  A.  Green,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Isadore  ,Tacoh.sen,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Raymond  Langley,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Louis  J.  Lavette.  Co.  G. 
I'vt.  Thomas  B.  Moore,  Co.  G. 
Sgt.  John  H.  Oldham,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Renzy  R.  Simpson,  Co.  G. 
•Pvt.  Clarence  A.  Sipple,  Co.  G. 
Bug.  Nick  Taggio.  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  James  W.  Wilson,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Parker  A.  Ashby,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Gordon  M.  Barrett,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  George  Bcvans,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Virgil  Bowden,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Campbell  S.  Brown,  Co.  H. 
Pf<>.  John  W.  Darnell,  Co.  H. 
Mech.  Joaquin  Fernandes,  Co.  H. 
•Pvt.  Finio  Gaetana,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  John  J.  Graham,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.   Lawrence  E.  Jones,  Co.   H. 


Winrvhig  the  Bois  dcs  Rappes 


173 


SIXTH    IXFANTRV— Con<;n»f(/ 


Pvt.  Jordan   Klopc,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Phillip  Manning,  Co.  H. 
Corp.  Harry  M.  Ray,  Co.  H. 
Corp.  Anderson  Tucker,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Henry  Webster,  Co.  H. 
♦Pvt.  Richard  Bell,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Irving  \.  Bent,  Co.  I. 
Mech.  Henry  E.  Cattey,  Co.   I. 
Pvt.  John  R.  Caddie,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Edd  I..  Gray,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Everett  F.  Harrell,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Pasqiiale  Russo,  Co.   I. 
Pfc.  John  Tolkun,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Oscar  White,  Co.   I. 
Pvt.  Osa  Arrasmith,  Co.   K. 
Pvt.  Elzie  Budd,  Co.  K. 
Sgt.  Bernie  Daniels,  Co.  K. 
Pfc.  Sherman  Douglas,  Co.   K. 
Pvt.  James  C.  Durall,  Co.   K. 
Pvt.  Corbie  Ellington,  Co.  K. 
Corp.  Emil  F.  Epple,  Co.  K. 
Pvt.  I-uther  Gabbard,  Co.   K. 
Pfc.  Lee  A.  Garritson,  Co.  K. 
Pvt.  Allen  Hinie,  Co.  K. 


Pvt.  John  Jasonis,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Merle  E.  Jones,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  George  Lewis,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Amedeo  Righi,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  John  Ross,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Robert  S.  Courtney,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.  Harvey  D.  Schrock,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  William  L.  Spence,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Olin  D.  Stuart,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  John  WofiFord,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.  Henrv  Boling,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Floyd  C.  Cabe,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Octave  Fontanot,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  William  Jordan,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Henry  Lee,  Co.  M. 

Pfc.  Cecil  McVey,  Co.  M. 
*Pvt.  Ed.  Marler,  Co.  M. 

Corp.  Anson  J.  Park,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Rudolph  Peterson,  Co.  M. 

Sgt.  Albert  Thomas,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Tilinan  Voyles,  Co.  M. 

Pfc.   Miirison   White,  Co.   M. 

Pfc.   Fulton  Whitworth,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.   Lester   Wood,  Co.  M. 


ELEVENTH   INFANTKV 


Pvt.  Henry  F.  Bushawn,  \\(\.  Co. 
*Pfc.  Rudolph  Vales,  H.(.  Co. 

Pfc.  William  Adamski,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pfc.  Mortimer  M.  Austin,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pfc.  Ollie  N.  Besgrove,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  John  W.  Carr,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Daniel  Hefferfinger,  M.  G.  Co. 
♦Pvt.  Samuel  Lang,  M.  G.  Co. 

Sgt.  Jake  McNair,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pfc.  Michael  H.  Michael,  M.  G.  Co. 

Corp.  Ohm  F.  Small,  M.  G.  Co. 

Corp.  Arless  Thomas,  M.  G.  Co. 

Wag.  Henry  Baker,  Sup.  Co.  • 

Pvt.  Isodian  .\rgrios,  Co.  A. 
♦Corp.  Fenton  G.  .Atkinson,  Co.  A. 
♦Pvt.  William  Bruce,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Fred  Cawood,  Co.  -\. 
♦Pvt.  Luici  Destafano,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Elisha  Doan,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Samuel  Grossman,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Fred  .\.  Humphrey.  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  William  Kain,  Co.  A. 

Corp.  William  Kelynack,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Joe  Martino,  Co.  A. 

Corp.  James  Mercer,  Co.  .\. 

Pvt.  Antonio  Miazga,  Co.  A. 
♦Corp.  Homer  W.  Moore,  Co.  ,\. 

Pfc.  Jo.seph  Newl)auer,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  Ralph  W.  Talbot,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Frank  Bailey,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Raymond  E."  Bell,  Co.  B. 

(♦)  Died  of  wounds. 


Pvt.  Claude  Bellittini,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  .Angello  Bufano,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  Elder  Chaney,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Meyer  Cooper,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Degnan,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Benjamin  Ginder,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Henry  GuUey,  Co.  B. 
♦Pvt.  Jesse"  Miles,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  George  F.  Northing,  Co.   B. 
♦Pvt.  Charles  0.sborne,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Andrew  Sekerak,  Co.  B. 
♦Corp.  Thomas  W.  Bibb,  Co.  C. 
♦Pvt.  Charley  A.  Cook,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Jesse  Brown  Cumming,  Co.  C. 

Bug.  Paul  Diorio,  Co.  C. 
♦Pfc.  Fred  Groner,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Andrew  Kaval,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  .Andrew  Kiryczneski,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  A  rchic  B.  Pierce,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  Herbert  O.  Rhodes,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Leo.  C.  Smith,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  Frank  A.  Styler,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Walter  Wise,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Clay  R.  Brown,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  Hiliie  Bussard,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  George  E.  Everett,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  Claude  McDowell,  Co.  D. 
♦Pvt.  Joseph  Pacovsky,  Co.  D. 
♦Pfc.  Frank  Phillips,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Henry  J.  Pitzenberger,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Frank  Reed,  Co.  D. 


174 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


ELEVENTH  INF A'STliY— Continued 


Corp.  Vincent  Skarinski,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Steven  J.  Skinner,  Co.  D. 

Sgt.  Frederick  A.  Tessmer,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  John  C.   Boyer,  Co.  E. 
♦Pvt.  William  Caiilder,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Lewis  S.  Fields.  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  James  Gaddy,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Charley  Garrison,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  William  T.  Harness,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Hallis  Hihbets,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Howard  H.  Hillman,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Augustus  R.  Johnson,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Frank  Kolsoliko,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Arthur  Lee,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Benjamin  Newlon,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Edward  Shea,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Raymond  Shijiley,  Co.  E. 

Sgt.  Aloysious  A.  Delaney,  Co.  F. 
*Pvt.  Stephen  Epp,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Frank  R.  Johnson,  Co.  F. 
♦Pvt.  Shelby  Johnson,  Co.  F. 
*Pvt.  Louis  Kasza,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Katz,  Co.  F. 

Corp.  Edward  F.  Kuskin,  Co.  F. 
*Pvt.  Victor  Leibcnsperper,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Charlie  Mitchell,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Thomas  N.  Norton,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Harry  Reid,  Co.  F. 

Sgt.  Arthur  Rodgers,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  John  E.  Romire,  Co.  F. 

Corp.  John   Rowley,  Co.   F. 

Corp.  Russell  C.  Warner,  Co.  F. 
•Pvt.  William  Willenbrink,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Warner  Yerger,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  John  Zilinski,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.  Ellis  D.  Adams,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Harry  M.  Becker,  Co.  G. 

Sgt.  Edward  J.  Cohen,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Charles  A.  Lacey,  Co.  G. 

Pfc.  Ray  Listen,  Co.  G. 
*Pvt.  Robert  L.  Mawyer,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Paola  Monacco,  Co.  G. 

Pfc.  John  Nabocik,  Co.  G. 
*Pvt.  Bert  Ray,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  William  H.  Weigle,  Co.  G. 
*Pvt.  Levator  Allen,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Babst,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Oliver  E.  Baskey,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Ray  Guillian,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  James  A.  Hammers,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Albert  E.  Jarvis,  Co.   H. 

Corp.  Fred  Krauss,  Co.  H. 

Sgt.  Ezra  McEntire,  Co.   H. 

Pvt.  John  Mandilakis,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  William  Murphy,  Co.  H. 

Pfc.  Douglas  Penland,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Howard  Runions,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Christensen  Snyder,  Co.   H. 

(*)  Died  of  wounds. 


Pvt.  Leonard  Trent.  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Leland  Wekher,  Co.  H. 

Corp.  Jessie  N.  Arnold,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Clarence  E.  Baker,  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  John  R.  Barr,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  .Toe  Bernowski,  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  Harry  C.  Harr,  Co.  I. 
*Pvt.  Comadore  Hinson,  Co.  L 

Pvt.  Tom  John,  Co.  L 

Pfc.  Benedyk  Koniipka.  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  John  H.  Lucas,  Co.  L 

Corp.  John  W.  McDade,  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  Joseph  Nadler,  Co.  1. 

Sgt.  Charles  N.  Nolan,  Co.  L 
*Pfc.  Allen  Nunemaker,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Phillo,  Co.  L 

Pvt.  Austin  Schuler,  Co.  L 
*Pvt.  Harry  C.  Schwerer,  Co.   L 

Sgt.  Fred  N.  Searlcs,  Co.  L 

Corp.  Walter  E.  Sheridan.  Co.  L 

Pfc.  Walter  H.  Storl,  Co.  L 

Pvt.  Peter  D.  Street,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  George  D.  AnderMin.  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Melton  J.  Archiliald,  Co.   K. 

Pfc.  James  M.  Beason,  Co.  K. 

Pfc.  Orville  Daugherty,  Co.  K. 
*Corp.  Joseph  C.  Free.se.  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Harrison  L.  Fugett,  Co.  K. 

Pfc.  Carl  Gordon,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Henry  D.  Keffer,  Co.  K. 

Pfc.  Claude   L.   Kimsey,  Co.   K. 
*Pvt.  Fred  L.  Lewis,  Co.  K. 

Pfc.  William  IJtchenwaller,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Harvey  Miller.  Co.  K. 

Pfc.  Robert  Nardi,  Co.  K. 
*Sgt.  Alex  Novack.  Co.  K. 
♦Pvt.  Albert   Parsons,  Co.   K. 
♦Pfc.  Frank  Seeberger,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Victor  A.  Smith,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  George  S.  Thompson,  Co.  K. 
♦Sgt.  Joseph   Walker,  Co.   K. 

Pfc.  Charlie  Winn,  Co.  K. 

Pfc.  Edward  B.  Baker,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  Elmer  H.   Brown,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.  George  W.  Dickey,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Sahantine  Dominio,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  William  Edwards,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Ray  E.  Henderson,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Thomas  J.  Overton,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  Horace  L.  Parrott,  Co.  L. 

Corp.  George  E.   Pitney,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Walter  E.  Rankin,  Co.  L. 

Sgt.   Hiram    Riddle,   Co.   L. 

Pvt.  Walter  Streiber,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Strosnider,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  George  W.  Barker,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Charles  Baumgartner,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Luther  F.   Bowlin,  Co.  M. 


Winniny  the  Boi.s  dcs  liappes 


175 


ELEVENTH  IXFA  STRY— Continued 


Pvt.  Jlaition  1..  Bowling,  Co.  M. 
Corp.  Bruce  Chambliss,  Co.   M. 
Pvt.  Michael  Connelly,  Co.  M. 
Bug.  Julius  Deaton,  Co.   SI. 
Pvt.  Ira  A.  Hysell,  Co.  M. 
Pvt.  Alfred  M.  Karr,  Co.  M. 


Pvt.  Joseph  Knight,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Serfmo  Macci,  Co.  M. 

Pfc.  Harri.son  A.  Quiglev,  Co.  M. 

Pfc.  Carl  Ray,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Archie  W.  Tanger,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Kazimierz  Wikowski,  Co.  M. 


FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Sgt.  Stanley  S.  Bowman,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Cecil  Roy  Down,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Charles  Ludwig,  Co.  A. 
Corp.  Patrick  McGuire,  Co.  A. 
•Pvt.  Alexander  A.  Jleikle,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  George  L.  Ostrander,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Beura  R.  Roper,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Jesse  S.  Scott,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  John  W.  Acklin,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  Andrew  Auflick,  Co.  B. 
Corp.  Julian  Epstein,  Co.  B. 
Pfc.  John  L.  Gedeon,  Co.  B. 
Pfc.  Bernard  B.  Hanford,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  John  M.  Leslie,  Co.  B. 
Corp.  William  Sillars,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  James  F.  Sullivan,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  Albert  Sir,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Leonard 


Pvt.  Fred  L.  Williams,  Co.  B. 
Sgt.  Samuel  R.  Gibson,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Claude  S.  Krupp,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  George  Maitncr,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Hypolit  Savitzky,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  John  M.  Tarbert,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  William  Vogel,  Co.  C. 
Pfc.  Charles  Abele,  Cn.  D. 
Pvt.  Jack  Berg,  Co.  D. 
*Pvt.  John  L.  Bryan,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  Murrow  Childress,  Co.  D. 
Pfc.  Henry  H.  Davis,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  Barbour  C.  Gunn,  Co.  D. 
•Pvt.  Edward  Morris,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  John  H.  Saunders,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  James  Scullion,  Co.  D. 
Sgt.  William  A.  Shuler,  Co.  D. 
Waddington,  Co.  D. 


SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 


•Pvt.  Arthur  W.  Schilling.  Hq.  Co. 
•Pfc.  Paul  M.  Rousey,  Med.  Det. 

Pvt.  Albert  W.  Sanders,  Med.  Det. 

Pvt.  William  G.  Smith,  Co.  A. 

Pfc.  Aino  Weno,  Co.  A. 

Corp.  Glen  Boring,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Harold  M.  Conipton,  Co.  B. 
•1st  Sgt.  Benjamin  H.  Doerr,  Co.  B. 
•Pvt.  Noel  C.  Donegan.  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Christopher  S.  Ford,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Claude  Pierce,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  David  Thibodeau,  Co.  B. 
*Pfc.  William   Thompson,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  Thomas  E.   Hunter,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Mike  Bale,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  George  Fendel,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Martin  J.  Ginley,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Wesley  F.  Grube,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Finer  Jensen,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Hans  W.  Jensen,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  David  S.  Kerr,  Co.  D. 
•Corj).   Walter  W.  Kirby,  Co.  D. 


Pvt.  James  R.  KnowUs,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Louis  B.  Kostcr,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Michael  J.  Lundv,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.   William  Mosher,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  Joseph  R.  O'Leary,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  Wilfred  E.  Beauvais,  Co.  E. 

Pfc.  Samuel  Bibo,  Co.  E. 
♦Sgt.  John  C.  Burgin,  Co.  E. 

Pfc.  Hugh  Coburn,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  John  J.  Condran,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Glen  B.  Cookinham.  Co.  E. 
•Corp.  Fred  O.  Fennel,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  John  F.  Skwiercz,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Champ  Carson,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Christian  H.  Haas,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Harry  E.  Huston,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.   Raymond  V.  Porter,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Mehnert  A.  Puschmann,  Co.  F 

Pvt.   Preston  Staton,  Co.  F. 
•Pvt.  Rayraon  N.  Thompson,  Co.  F. 

Corj).  Elijah  B.  Dixon. 
•Pfc.  Martin  J.  Taylor. 


(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


176 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


THIRTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Pfc.  Frederick  Yaiinantuono,  Med.  Det. 
Wag.  Olgel  .Vllegood,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Richard  A.  Fischer,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Dawhiian  C.  Grogan.  Co.  A. 
Pvt.   Konstanti  Jakobo\v.ski,  Co.  A. 
Pfc.  Gii.st  Ka.stanias,  Co.  A. 
*\Vag.  Jake  W.  Killgrove,  Co.  A. 


*Wag.  George  C.  Wrenn,  Co.  A. 
*\Vag.  James  C.  McGhee,  Co.  B. 
*Sgt.  Raymond  N.  Mosher,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Harry  A.  Ne.ss,  Co.  B. 

Wag.  Floyd  E.  Scroggin,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  John  D.  Siddons,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Alfred  Stahl,  Co.  B. 


NINTH  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 


Sgt.  Orin  S.  Carlon. 
Pvt.  Michael  J.  Conroy. 


Corp.  Jack  H.  Hammons. 
•Pvt.  Harry  S.  Saunier. 


FIFTH  MILITARY  POLICE 
*Pfc.  Carl  Stewart. 

FIFTH  SUPPLY  TRAIN 
Corp.  A\'illiam  P.  Bliss,  Co.  E. 


Pfc.  Louis  Green. 


FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIN 

*Sgt.  Alexander  J.  MacDonald. 


FIFTH  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 
Pvt.  Gordon  Mason,  Co.  G. 


(*)   Dicil  of  wounds. 


Winning  the  Bois  dcs  Rappcs  177 

BATTALION   AND   HIGHER   COMMANDERS    IN    FIFTH   DIVISION 
IN  FIRST  PHASE  ARGONNE-MEUSE  OPERATION 

Major  General  John  E.  McMahon,  Commanding  Division  to  October  Kith. 
Major  General  Hanson  E.  Ely,  Commanding  Division  from  October  17th. 
First  Lieutenant  Leslie  W.  Devereux,  Aide  de  Camp  to  General  McMahon. 
Captain  Arthur  P.  Watson,  Aide  de  Camp  to  General  Ely. 

GENERAL  STAFF 

Colonel  Clement  A.  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Martin  C.  Shallenberger,  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-I,  to  Octolier  15th. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Stejihcn  C.   Reynolds,  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1,  from  October   Kith. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Herliert  Parsons,  .\ssistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-2. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Ralph  W.  Kingman,  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-3. 

PRINCIPAL  STAFF  OFFICERS 

Colonel  Robert  H.  Pierson,  Division  Surgeon. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Gilbert  M.  Allen,  Division  Machine  Gun  Officer. 

Lieutenant  Colonel   P.  James  Cosgrave,  Division  Judge  .Advocate. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  -\lvin  G.  Gutcnsohn,  Division  Signal  Officer. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Wallace  McXaniara,  Division  Inspector. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  David  P.   Wood,  Division  Adjutant. 

Major  Charles  Meals,  Division  (Quartermaster. 

Captain  Raymond  Woodson,  Division  Ordnance  Officer. 

Captain  A.  M.  Fisher,  Division  Gas  Officer  to  October  17th. 

Major  B.  H.  Namm,  Division  Gas  Officer  from  October  18th. 

Captain  Thomas  A.  Knight,  Secretary  to  General  Staff. 

NINTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner,  Commanding  brigade. 
First  IJeutenant  Frank  M.  Smith,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Second  Lieutenant  Rowland  H.  Peacock,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Captain  Ray  K.  Chalfant,  Brigade  Adjutant. 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Frank  B.  Hawkins,  Commanding  regiment. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Phillip  B.  Peyton,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Geoffrey  P.  Baldwin,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
Major  Lee  D.  Davis,  Commanding  third  battalion. 

SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Hugh  D.  Wise,  Commanding  regiment. 

Captain  Lawrence  B.  Glasgow,  Commanding  first  battalion,  wounded  October  I'ilh. 

Captain  Merritt  E.  Olmstead,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  October  lath. 

Captain   Alexander  N.  Stark,  Commanding  second  battalion. 

Major  James  D.  Rivet,  Commanding  third  battalion,  killed  October  I.5th. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Lowe  K.  McClure,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  October  KJth. 

FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Major  Jens  A.  Doe,  Conunanding  battalion. 

TENTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Paul  B    Malone,  Commanding  brigade. 
Major  George  H.  van  de  Steeg,  Brigade  Adjutant. 


178  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

•  SIXTH   INFANTRY 

Colonel   Henry  .1.  Hunt,  Commanding  regiment. 

Major   Felix  R.  McLean,  Commanding  first  battalion,  wounded  Oetolier  Htli. 

Ca))tain  Lawrence  B.  Keiser,  Commanding  first  liattalion  from  ()ctol)er  ir)tli. 

Major  Courtney  H.  Hodges,  Commanding  seeond  liattalion. 

Major  .John  W.  Leonard,  Connnanding  third  l>attalion,  wounded  Oetolier   llitli. 

Cajitain  Guy  L.  Hartman,  Connnanding  third  l)attalion  from  Dctulier  17th. 

ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 

Colonel  John  B.  Bennet,  Commanding  regiment  to  October  2()th. 
Major  John  H.  Munca.stcr,  Connnanding  regiment  from  Oetolier  '21st. 
Major  Frank  C.  Mahin,  Commanding  first  battalion  to  October  l!Hh. 
Captain  John  F.  Harris,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  October  20th. 
Major  John  H.  Muneaster,  Connnanding  second  battalion. 
Major   Richard  C.  Birmingham,  Commanding  third  battalion. 

FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
Major  William  M.  Grimes,  Commanding  battalion. 

SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 

Colonel  Earl  G.  Panics,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  William  M.  Hoge,  Jr.,  Connnanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Wyman  R.  Swan,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
First  Lieutenant  Peter  Murphy,  Commanding  train. 

THIRTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
Major  Walton  H.  Walker,  Commanding  battalion. 

NINTH  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 
Major  Dean  B.  Small,  Connnanding  battalion. 

HEADQUARTERS  TROOP 
First  Lieutenant  Carl  U.  Luers,  Commanding  troop. 

FIFTH  DIVISION  TRAINS 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Harry  E.  Comstock,  Connnanding  trains. 

FIFTH  SUPPLY  TRAIN 
Major  Oral  E.  Clark,  Connnanding  train. 

FIFTH  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 

Lieutenant  Colonel  R.  John  We.st,  Connnanding  train. 
Major  Frederick  A.  Barker,  Connnanding  motor  battalion. 
Major  Raymond   Dickson,  Commanding  horsed  battalion. 

FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIN 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Carey  J.  Vaux,  Connnanding  train. 
Major  Frederic  J.  Quigley,  Director  of  Field  H<ispitals. 
Captain  James  H.  Quinn,  Director  of  -Ambulance  Companies. 

MILITARY  POLICE 
Major  William  H.  Gill,  Commanding  military  police. 


Chapter  V 

thp:  advance  to  the  meuse 


II E  Third  Corps  Cnniniaiider  ordered,  on  Oc- 
tol)er  2-it]i,  that  the  l^'iftli  Division  make  imme- 
diate re'-onnaissanee  of  the  seetor  held  by  the 
Third  Division,  from  the  Meuse  above  BrieuUes 
in  the  general  line  Clery-le-Petit — Cote  201 — 
Clery-le-Grand — Eois  de  Eabiemont — Aincre- 
ville.  The  reeonnaissances  were  made  on  the 
morning  of  the  25th  by  l)rigade,  I'egimental  and 
battalion  commanders.  Orders  for  the  relief  of 
the  Third  by  the  Fifth  Division  were  reeeived  on  the  2Gth  and  the 
movement  of  the  troops  from  the  Malancourt-Avocourt  areas  was 
begun  shortly  after  noon. 

This  new  sector  was  just  to  the  right  of  the  Fifth's  old  one.  The 
front  line  extended  from  the  northeast  corner  of  Eois  des  Rapjjes 
along  the  northeastern  edge  of  Clairs  Chenes,  across  the  northern 
slope  of  the  ojjen  hill  called  Cote  299,  along  the  northern  and  east- 
ern edges  of  Bois  de  Foret,  doubling  back  for  a  kilometer  along  the 
southeastern  edge  of  Bois  de  Foret,  thence  south  to  Bois  de  Brieulles, 
thence  along  the  northern  edges  of  Bois  de  Brieulles  and  Bois  de  la 
Cote  Lemont  to  the  jSIeuse,  a  kilometer  and  a  half  southeast  of 
Brieulles.  On  our  right  was  the  Fifteenth  French  Division,  part  of 
their  Seventeenth  Army  Corps,  facing  and  unable  to  cross  the  river. 
On  our  left  was  the  Ninetieth  Division,  holding  the  western  portion 
of  the  Third  Corps  sector  vacated  by  the  Fifth  four  days  previously. 
The  east  boundary  of  the  Division's  sector  was  the  Meuse,  while 
the  western  limit  was  the  east  edge  of  Bois  des  Rappes,  Aincreville 
(inclusive),  Bois  de  Babiemont  (inclusive).  Thus  the  sphere  of 
action  was  confined  practically  to  the  north.  It  was  less  than  a  kilo- 
meter from  the  eastern  end  of  Bois  de  Foret  down  to  the  Meuse. 
South  of  that  the  lines  formed  a  ring  on  the  hills  around  the  village 
of  Brieulles,  still  in  Boche  hands.     From  our  lines  all  along  this 


s 


a 


~C5 


=>2 


cq 


The  Advance  to  the  Mcusc  181 

southern  section  there  was  full  \ie\v  of  the  wiiuling  ri\er  in  its  wide, 
flat  valley,  with  the  Canal  de  I'Est  hugging  closely  the  higher  hills 
on  the  east  side  of  the  bottoms.  The  Germans  were  strongly  situated 
in  those  heights  of  the  ^Nleuse  and  by  means  of  their  superior  altitude 
were  able  to  protect  their  patrols  still  controlling  the  western  bank. 

North  of  Bois  de  Foret  and  Clairs  Chenes  our  lines  faced  the 
Andon  Rau,  only  a  tinj^  creek,  in  some  places  nothing  but  a  trickling 
current  in  a  wide  stretch  of  marsh;  in  other  parts  narrow  and  per- 
haps three  or  four  feet  deejj,  winding  its  circuitous  course  in  and  out, 
from  side  to  side  of  a  wide,  muddy  valley  bottom.  To  the  south  the 
slopes  rose  gradually  from  the  stream  to  our  lines,  while  on  the  north 
the  hills  were  somewhat  steeper,  but  not  so  high  as  on  the  south. 
On  the  banks  of  the  Andon  were  three  villages:  Aincreville,  just  a 
kilometer  north  of  Bois  des  Rappes;  Clery-le-Grand,  two  and  a  half 
kilometers  below  Aincreville;  and  Clery-le-Pctit,  two  kilometers  on 
further  down  the  stream  and  only  five  hundred  meters  from  the 
Meuse.  These  three  villages  were  garrisoned  by  Cierman  machine- 
gun  companies,  whence  outpost  j^atrols  operated  in  the  territory  south 
of  the  Andon.  The  towns  formed  outguards  of  the  Freya  Stellung 
which  the  Boche  had  extended  all  along  the  heights  north  of  the  little 
stream  and  across  the  highlands  east  of  the  Meuse. 

Those  rather  steep-rising  slopes  north  of  Andon  Rau  rose  to 
form  the  southern  rim  of  the  I'unchbowl.  a  crater-like  area  two  to 
three  kilometers  in  diameter  with  round-tojjped  Cote  21(5  in  its  center, 
completely  ringed  in  by  high  hills  except  on  the  east,  where  the  Meuse 
pierced  the  walls  and  cut  off  Dun-sur-Meuse  on  its  high,  conical 
mound.  On  the  southeastern  lip  of  the  liowl,  and  on  the  Aincreville- 
Dun  road  was  Doulcon.  The  western  rim  of  the  Punchbowl  was 
wooded  by  Bois  de  Babiemont,  just  inside  the  Division  sector. 

The  Ninth  Brigade  took  the  forward  j^art  of  the  sector,  with  the 
Sixty-first  Infantry  on  the  left  in  Bois  de  Clairs  Chenes  and  on  Cote 
299.  The  Sixtieth  on  the  right  took  the  lines  in  Bois  de  Foret,  and 
had.  therefore,  to  face  three  directions — to  the  north,  east  and  south- 
east. The  Tenth  Brigade  formed  the  reserve  and  took  over  only  the 
southernmost  section,  southeast  of  the  Nantillois-Brieulles  road. 
Major  Hodges'  battalion  of  the  Sixth  occupied  the  front  lines  on 
the  edges  of  Bois  de  Brieulles  and  Bois  de  la  Cote  Lemont,  and  the 
remainder  of  the  regiment  camped  in  Bois  de  Septsarges.  The 
Eleventh  Infantry  took  a  reserve  position  on  the  left  of  the  Sixth, 
with  its  head  south  of  Bois  de  Fays,  echeloned  in  depth  to  the  south. 
Due  to  the  large  number  of  casualties  among  officers  in  the  regiments 
the  trains  had  given  u]i  most  of  their  officers  to  i-eplace  the  fighting 


'-t=. 


5^ 


The  Advance  to  the  Meuse  183 

units.  Lieutenant  Colonel  R.  John  West,  commanding  the  Anmiuni- 
tion  Ti'ain,  had  joined  the  Eleventh  Infantry  and  assumed  command. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Peyton  of  the  Sixtieth  Infantiy  had  been  placed 
in  command  of  the  Sixty-first  when  Colonel  Wise  was  relieved  on 
October  19th. 

The  relief  of  the  Third  Division  was  carried  out  quietly  and  with 
but  little  disturbance  by  the  enemy.  The  Sixth  Infantry  was  in  posi- 
tion by  midnight  and  by  4  o'clock  the  Ninth  Brigade  had  completed 
its  reliefs.  The  only  activity  of  the  Germans  was  the  harassing 
fire  that  came  from  north  of  the  Andon  and  east  of  the  Meuse,  which 
brought  the  death  of  Second  Lieutenant  Bennie  A.  Green  of  the 
Fourteenth  INIachine  Gim  Battalion.  There  was  an  occasional  rifle 
shot  or  machine-gun  sputter  from  the  direction  of  Aincreville  when 
our  men  approached  too  closely.  The  Cunel-Nantillois  road  was 
subject  to  continued  shelling  with  high-explosive,  while  other  areas 
received  spasmodic  attention  with  gas.  The  morning  of  the  27th  was 
foggy,  with  heavy  mists  hanging  over  the  valleys  of  the  Meuse  and 
the  Andon  cutting  off"  observation. 

II 

The  policy  now  adopted  was  that  of  exploitation  of  the  areas 
ahead.  Nmiierous  patrols  were  constantly  in  action,  feeling  out  the 
enemy  and  creeping  out  two  or  three  kilometers  beyond  the  outposts. 
Where  ground  could  be  taken  and  held  at  small  cost  it  was  seized. 
The  day  of  the  27th  was  spent  in  getting  acquainted  with  the  situa- 
tion. Little  movement  could  be  made  in  da5dight  because  of  the 
exposure  of  the  ground  in  front  to  enemy  gaze.  A  patrol  of  eight 
men  entering  Clery-le-Grand  was  filled  upon  by  machine  guns  that 
night,  but  five  men  entered  Clery-le-Petit  without  encountering  op- 
position. Aincreville  was  found  to  be  still  strongly  held.  Indica- 
tions were  that  the  enemy  was  preparing  to  withdraw  to  the  north 
if  necessary.  His  artillery  fire  diminished  noticeably  on  the  28th 
and  our  front  lines  were  only  lightly  shelled.  The  shrapnel-fire, 
however,  killed  Second  Lieutenant  Thomas  G.  Kadlac  of  the  Sixtieth. 
The  weather  was  excellent  and  our  planes  reported  considerable  traffic 
moving  north  from  the  rear  of  the  hostile  lines. 

A  general  advance  of  our  lines  was  effected  on  the  night  of  the 
28th  by  our  patrols  establishing  night  outposts  on  the  hills  in  front  of 
the  woods.  The  spurs  northwest  and  northeast  of  Clairs  Chenes,  dom- 
inating Aincreville  and  Clery-le-Grand,  were  incorporated  into  om- 
territory  and  held  with  machine  guns.     The  new  outpost  line  was 


jit'-'^^^ii=sf 


=  a- 


=   3 


The  Advance  to  the  Meiise  183 

■\vitliin  half  a  kilometer  of  the  Andon  and  the  Meuse.  while  the  ring 
around  lirieiiUes  was  tightened  to  a  narrow  collar.  Parties  from  the 
Sixtieth  and  Sixty-first  crossed  the  Andon  and  drew  fire  from  the 
villaacs  on  the  stream.  Fires  in  the  hills  to  the  north  and  the  sounds 
of  wagons  moving  on  the  roads  were  evidence  of  the  retirement  of  the 
Boche  to  safer  positions.  His  artillery  fire  had  almost  ceased,  al- 
though his  avions  circled  overhead  in  the  hi'iglit  mooidight  and 
dropped  bombs  on  our  front  lines. 

Our  own  artillery  continued  its  harassing  fire,  covering  the  roads 
and  sowing  the  lines  with  steel.  The  telling  effect  with  which  our 
guns  punished  the  enemy  is  ix'lated  by  a  soldier  of  the  Fortieth  Fusi- 
liers in  a  captured  letter:  "It  is  a  week  that  we  have  been  in  line  again 
and  things  are  getting  hot  here.  Xo  infantry  action  yet,  but  the 
artillery  fire  is  frightful.  It  is  simply  maddening.  If  peace  does 
not  come  soon  I  am  going  to  desert.  Xights  at  11  o'clock  we  get 
dinner  (mittagessen)  cold,  besides  bread  and  coffee  for  the  next  day. 
And  then  you  crouch  all  day  long  in  a  shell-hole  until  a  shell  gets 
you."  Another  letter  ran:  "The  word  'Stellung"  is  not  the  proper 
expression  for  the  front  line;  it  should  be  'Sit/ung."  All  day  long, 
on  account  of  enemy  planes  we  have  to  sit  in  our  little  'fox-holes,' 
covered  by  a  shelter-half  and  wait  foi-  night  when  we  can  move  about 
a  little.  So  if  the  location  of  our  position  beconics  known  to  the 
enemy  artillery,  instead  of  our  getting  into  dugouts  each  one  takes 
his  pack  and  moves  on.  Yesterday  the  Americans  shelled  us  out 
and  willy-nilly  we  had  to  dig  a  new-  position  last  night." 

While  our  artillery  was  making  life  miserable  for  the  Boche 
sitting  in  his  Freya  Stellung,  and  our  j)ati'ols  were  encroaching  on 
his  territory  and  adding  it  bit  by  bit  to  our  lines,  the  work  c^f  organ- 
izing the  sector  for  defense  was  carried  on.  Machine  guns  of  the 
Fourteenth  and  Fifteenth  Battalions  and  of  the  regimental  com- 
panies were  put  into  position  to  sweep  every  approach  to  our  posts. 
The  Engineers  were  engaged  in  wii-ing  in  the  front  from  Bois  des 
Rappes  to  the  river,  in  getting  up  materiel  and  I'cconnoitering  for 
the  bridges  across  the  Andon  and  in  removing  (xcrman  mines  from 
the  roads  about  Brieulles.  The  ai'tillery  prepared  bai'i-ages  to  cover 
the  east  bank  of  the  Meuse  and  heights  l)eyond  the  Andon.  Troops 
were  well  distributed  so  as  to  lessen  the  danger  of  casualties  from 
shelling  and  to  give  as  many  as  possible  a  chance  to  rest.  Training- 
was  never  stopped.  Special  instruction  was  given  in  the  use  of  the 
compass.  IVIen  were  taught  to  make  their  w^ay  through  difficult  ter- 
rain guided  only  by  the  magnetic  needle.  Advantage  was  taken  of 
the  comparative  lull   to   restock  the  supplies  of  ammunition,   pyro- 


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TJie  Advance  to  the  Meuse  187 

technics  and  other  stores.  The  troops  received  bountiful  meals  of 
hot  food  and  with  the  drier,  fair  weather  recuperated  after  the  trying 
days  in  the  Bois  des  Rappes. 

Plans  were  being  worked  out  for  another  offensive  by  the  Amer- 
ican Army.  The  structure  of  the  Central  Einj^ires,  whose  crumbling 
was  evident  on  the  first  of  October,  was  toppling  in  ruins  at  the  end 
of  the  month.  Turkey  surrendered  on  the  31st.  The  mighty  armies 
of  Austria-Hungarj',  attacked  by  the  Italians  on  the  24'th,  were 
broken  on  the  29th  and  were  rapidly  dissolving  under  the  sledge- 
hammer strokes.  On  the  western  front  the  Germans  had  been  swept 
back  by  the  vigorous  and  relentless  attacks  of  Belgians,  British, 
French  and  Americans.  The  Hun  had  given  up  St.  Quentin,  Cam- 
brai,  Lille,  Ostend,  and  the  entire  coast  and  was  hurrying  out  of 
France  and  Belgium  as  fast  as  his  humbled  armies  could  travel.  If 
the  American  Army  on  the  ]Meuse  could  cut  the  Mctz-Sedan-Hirson 
line  of  communications  and  then  drive  northward  to  Luxembourg 
and  i)lug  that  narrow  bottle-neck  south  of  Holland,  disaster  for  the 
Germans  would  be  complete. 

The  first  push  was  to  be  due  north  to  clear  all  the  territory  south 
of  the  Meuse.  The  mission  of  the  Third  Corps,  on  the  right  of  the 
army,  was  to  be  performed  by  the  Xinetieth  Division  sweeping  north 
toward  Stenay.  The  Fifth  Division's  task  was  to  pivot  on  its  right 
flank,  seizing  only  those  points  which  the  advance  of  the  Ninetieth 
made  possible  for  us. 

Meanwhile  General  Castner  continued  liis  activities  of  achiev- 
ing small  gains  at  little  cost.  Our  patrols  found  that  Aincreville  was 
but  liglitly  held,  as  the  enemy  had  evidently  withdrawn  most  of  his 
posts  there  when  the  Sixty-first  seized  the  heights  overlooking  the 
village.  Accordingly  on  the  niglit  of  October  29th  plans  were  put 
in  operation  to  take  the  town  fi-om  the  Boche.  Company  F  of  the 
Sixty-first,  led  by  First  I^ieutenant  Robert  W.  Young,  advanced  at 
2 :30  A.  M.  of  the  30th  and  under  cover  of  the  darkness  waded  waist- 
deep  the  chilly  waters  of  the  Andon.  A  green  rocket  from  the 
attacking  party  as  they  plunged  into  the  stream  brought  from  the 
Ninetieth  Division  a  machine  gun  barrage,  according  to  plans  agreed 
upon  by  General  Castner's  and  the  Ninetieth  Division's  troops.  The 
barrage  was  placed  on  the  west  end  of  tlie  village  to  divert  the  atten- 
tion of  the  Boche  until  Company  F  could  enter  the  town,  "\^^len  the 
moon  came  out,  enabling  them  to  distino-uish  objects,  they  entered 
the  village.  The  l)arrage  was  changed  to  a  lialf  box  enclosing  the 
western  and  northern  edges  of  Aincreville.  to  cut  ofl'  the  enemy.  Two 
enemy  machine  gun  companies  fled  northward  through  the  barrage 


i:  =Q 


The  Advance  to  the  3Ieuse  189 

into  the  hills,  leaving  us  two  prisoners  in  the  running  street  fight. 
A  garrison  of  forty  men  with  four  machine  guns  was  established  in 
Aincreville  and  the  place  was  firmly  incorporated  into  our  system, 
with  liaison  to  the  Ninetieth  Division  on  om*  left.  The  enemy  drew 
back  to  Bois  de  Babiemont,  but  still  showed  himself  in  Clery-le- 
Grand  and  Clery-le-Petit.  Large  quantities  of  valuable  militarj^ 
stores  had  been  left  behind  in  the  town,  including  nuich  engineer 
material  and  lumber.  Our  men  found  the  cellars  stocked  with  Ger- 
man beer  and  for  a  while  the  Sixty-first  lived  well  in  Aincreville. 

As  if  in  retaliation  for  the  taking  of  Aincreville  the  activity  of 
the  German  artillery  became  greater  on  the  .'iOth  and  numerous 
enemy  planes  circled  our  lines  throughout  the  day,  flying  as  far  back 
as  the  Ninth  Brigade  P.  C.  at  Ferme  de  la  Madeleine,  directing  the 
artillery  fire  which  grew  more  intense.  ^Nlany  of  the  shells  were 
duds.  The  front  lines  and  newly-won  Aincreville  were  bombarded 
heavily,  bringing  casualties.  I^ieutenant  Young  was  killed  by  a  Hun 
machine  o'unner  who  had  remained  hidden  in  the  old  village  church 


(-^' 


tower.  That  night  there  was  renewed  bombing  in  the  region  of  the 
Division  P.  C.  in  Bois  de  Tuilerie. 

The  southern  half  of  our  sector  was  cleared  of  the  enemy  on  the 
night  of  the  30th,  when  Major  Hodges'  patrols  occu])ied  BrieuUes. 
Every  night  these  parties  had  been  covering  the  ri\er  bank  up  as  far 
as  the  village.  On  General  Ely's  orders  to  clean  up  everything  west 
of  the  river  to  the  northern  edge  of  the  town,  two  patrols  entered 
BrieuUes  about  8  p.  :\i.  without  finding  traces  of  Bodies.  The  enemy 
had  seen  the  collar  around  the  tf)wn  tightening,  and  consequently  had 
evacuated  the  place  that  evening.  One  patrol  of  an  officer  and 
seventeen  men  established  a  position  on  the  high  ground  command- 
ing the  river,  while  a  second  group  made  its  way  a  kilometer  north 
of  the  village  without  encountering  the  enemy.  Patrols  of  the  Six- 
tieth operating  on  the  Meuse  north  of  BrieuUes  observed  a  large 
party  of  Germans  hauling  material  across  the  river  at  a  ford.  They 
were  saving  what  they  could  carry  away  as  they  evacuated  to  the 
eastern  shores.  All  bridges  had  already  been  destroyed  across  both 
river  and  canal,  and  om-  patrols  attempting  to  cross  to  exploit  the 
east  banks  found  the  few  fords  strongly  guarded.  Our  parties  drew 
fire  from  the  op])osite  hills  and  could  not  get  across  to  investigate 
the  strength  of  the  enemy.  '^ 

The  new  American  attack  was  to  be  made  on  November  1st.  To 
the  Ninetieth  Division  the  first  battalion  of  the  Sixty-first  Infantry 
was  attached  for  the  offensive.  As  the  Fifth  and  Third  Corps  drove 
north  and  then  swung  east  to  the  river,  it  was  to  be  the  Fifth  Divi- 


®J 


s 

<3 

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2^ 


The  Advance  to  the  Me  use  191 

sion's  mission  to  exploit  the  grouiul  north  of  its  hnes  and  move  over 
to  the  river  as  the  Ninetietli  advanced.  It  was  apparent  that  it 
would  soon  become  the  task  of  the  Red  Diamond  to  force  a  crossin"- 
of  the  Meuse,  for  the  French  had  been  battering  against  the  river 
unsuccessfully  for  weeks.  Accordingly,  General  Castner  planned  a 
direct  attack  on  his  front  to  seize  the  ground  next  to  the  Meuse  in 
order  to  secure  an  advantageous  footing  for  a  crossing  and  to  recon- 
noitre the  banks  as  soon  as  possible.  The  batteries  of  the  Third 
Ai-tillerj^  Brigade,  now  o])erating  with  our  Division,  placed  a  two- 
hour  concentration  of  fire  on  the  enemy's  sensitive  points  in  the 
Freya  Stellung  north  of  the  Andon.  At  .5:30  of  November  1st,  the 
attack  hour  of  the  Ninetieth,  Company  M  of  the  Sixtieth  with  foin- 
machine  guns  of  Company  C  of  the  Foin-teenth,  under  Lieutenant 
Horace  R.  Tune,  rushed  forward.  In  four  minutes  the  force  had 
waded  the  Andon  and  were  in  full  possession  of  Clery-le-Grand. 
Three  prisoners  were  taken  and  the  three  Boche  machine  gun  com- 
panies holding  the  town  were  driven  northward. 

Comj^any  I  of  the  Sixty-first,  accompanied  by  a  platoon  of 
Company  D,  Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion,  had  worked  their 
way  from  Aincreville  four  hundred  meters  up  the  slope  northeast 
of  the  village  preparatory  to  exj)loiting  Bois  de  Babiemont.  The 
Sixty-first  Machine  (inn  Company  supported  this  advance  from  a 
position  south  of  the  Andon.  The  little  company  of  eighty  infantry- 
men, led  by  Captain  Russell  S.  Fisher,  charged  from  their  conceal- 
ment at  10  o'clock,  but  on  reaching  tlie  valley  southwest  of  the  wood 
met  with  strong  resistance  from  machine  guns  located  in  shell-holes 
in  the  open  field.  Hand-to-hand  fighting  netted  the  capture  of  an 
officer  and  110  men  and  six  machine  guns,  a  much  larger  force  than 
Captain  Fisher  had  in  his  attacking  company.  Further  advance, 
however,  was  impossible,  for  the  gims  in  the  wood  ahead  covered  the 
company  with  unquenchable  fire.  The  men  dug  in  for  the  night, 
having  lost  eight  killed  and  twenty  wounded. 

After  oceujjying  Clery-le-Grand,  Company  M  of  the  Sixtieth 
continued  its  exploitation;  aided  by  barrages  from  machine  guns  of 
the  Fourteenth,  placed  on  the  forward  slopes  of  Cotes  299  and  281, 
it  succeeded  late  in  the  afternoon  in  mounting  tlie  western  slopes  of 
Hill  261,  north  of  the  village.  Light  artillery,  one-pounder  and 
machine  gun  fire  from  the  southern  rim  of  the  Punchbowl  was  heavy, 
but  the  men  dug  in  and  held  their  orains.  The  day's  casualties  were 
two  killed  and  fifteen  wounded.  The  action  of  these  two  companies 
had  advanced  the  Brigade  lines  over  half  a  kilometer  along  the  entire 
northern  front.    The  cost  had  been  comparatively  small.    The  Nine- 


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~;5 


*3 


The  Advance  to  the  Meuse  193 

tieth  Division  liad  met  with  success  in  its  attack,  taking  the  ridge 
running  southwest  from  Andevanne.  Our  advanced  patrols  were 
in  haison  with  our  own  first  hattahon  of  the  Sixty-first,  which  was 
operating  on  tlie  right  flank  of  the  Ninetieth. 

The  attack  of  the  entire  army  was  making  headway  and  the 
CTeiMuans  were  witlich'awing  under  strenuous  pressiu-e  toward  Sedan. 
Phuis  for  the  pursuit  of  the  fieeing  enemy  called  for  the  Fifth  Divi- 
sion to  estahlisli  a  hridgehead  for  the  Army  on  the  river  Meuse  and 
to  open  the  roads  eastward  and  northward  toward  Montmedy  and 
I^onguyon.  The  forcing  of  a  crossing  in  the  Red  Diamond  sector 
hetween  Dun  and  \"ilosnes  presented  a  harder  prohlem  tlian  at  any 
other  point  on  the  river,  foi-  the  whole  front  was  dominated  by  the 
heights  whicli  rose  sjiar])ly  from  the  hanks  of  the  Canal  de  I'Est. 
Xorth  of  Dun  the  heights  gave  way  to  a  flat  river  ])lain;  just  east 
of  Vilosnes  the  hills  also  receded  from  the  stream. 

The  Fifth  made  careful  ])lans  for  pushing  across  the  river  and 
driving  the  Eochcs  out  of  the  heights.  AVhile  General  Castner's  bri- 
gade was  progressing  northward,  seizing  the  approaches  to  the  river 
opposite  Dun,  Creneral  Malone's  men  were  constantly  reconnoitering 
the  stream  in  the  vicinity  of  Brieulles,  searching  for  fords  and  likely 
l)ridge  sites.  The  Se\  eiith  Kngineers  were  co-oj)erating  with  Major 
Hodges'  patrols  and  the  I'ivei-  hanks  were  thorouglily  covered. 
Crossings  were  attempted  on  tlie  night  of  November  1st,  but  the 
eastern  sides  were  too  well  guarded  to  permit  of  success.  The  en- 
emy out])osts  threw  up  flares  at  frequent  intervals  which  rendered 
the  whole  area  as  light  as  day.  Tlieir  machine  guns  flred  on  our 
patrols  whenever  a  movement  to  cross  was  made. 

The  ahsor])tion  of  the  enemy's  territory  north  of  the  Andon  was 
contimied  by  the  Ninth  Brigade  on  November  "ind.  Clery-le-Petit, 
the  lone  remaining  outpost  on  the  Rau.  was  taken  and  the  front 
ino\ed  up  another  kilometer.  The  town  was  approachable  from  our 
lines  only  by  way  of  the  bald  hill  northeast  of  Bois  de  Foret.  This 
path  was  exposed  to  direct  Are  h\nn  the  east  banks  of  the  Meuse.  To 
take  the  village  by  sur])rise,  Companies  A  and  PI  of  the  Sixtieth, 
under  command  of  Cai)tain  Frederic  C.  Dose,  stole  down  the  hill 
from  our  lines  during  the  night  and  drew  as  close  to  the  enemy's 
outj)osts  as  the  fog  and  darkness  woidd  permit.  The  eastern  banks 
of  the  Meuse  were  bombarded  by  our  artillery  to  silence  opposition 
from  that  angle,  and  the  two  companies  rushed  Clery-le-Petit.  The 
two  machine  gun  companies  in  the  town  put  up  little  resistance;  they 
retreated  towards  Doulcon,  leaving  us  fifteen  prisoners  and  large 
supplies  of  coal  and  war  stores.     The  enemy's  artillery  and  snipers 


>»■■' 


■Ssj 


s 

1-^ 


iC 


5 


The  Advance  to  the  Meuse  195 

immediately  got  busy  and  all  day  long  the  town  was  hot  with  77's, 
one-pounders  and  machine  gun  fire.  The  Sixtieth  held  on  regardless 
of  the  punishment,  with  losses  of  fourteen  wounded.  Parties  from 
the  force  in  Clery-Ie-Petit  continued  on  northward  and  by  night  had 
driven  the  enemy  off  Hill  "iOl.  Connection  with  the  men  from  Com- 
pany M,  who  had  taken  Clery-le-Grand  and  the  west  slope  of  the 
hill,  was  effected  and  our  observers  looked  down  from  the  southern 
rim  into  the  Punchbowl  and  at  Doulcon  and  the  Meuse. 

Company  L  of  the  Sixty-first  joined  Company  I,  which  had 
attacked  liois  de  IJabiemont  on  the  1st.  The  two  companies  went  on 
north  and  took  the  wood  against  scattered  machine  gun  resistance. 
Two  prisoners  were  annexed  and  the  force  pushed  on  north  along  the 
western  rim  of  the  I'unchbowl.  Pati-ols  followed  aroimd  the  southern 
edge  and  found  the  Sixtieth.  There  was  heavy  flanking  fire  from 
hostile  machine  guns  in  the  woods  in  the  sector  of  the  Ninetieth;  but 
that  disturbance  was  removed  when  our  battalion  oi)erating  with  that 
division  was  sent  up  late  in  the  afternoon  and  cleared  up  the  ground 
as  far  north  as  Villers-devant-Dun.  Lieutenant  Cecil  D.  Erux  of 
the  Sixty-first  was  killed. 

The  Ninth  Brigade  had  swept  the  enemj'  entirely  out  of  its  sec- 
tor, which  extended  only  to  Bois  de  Babiemont.  On  November  3rd 
the  Punchbowl  was  added  to  the  Fifth's  territory  and  the  task  of  mop- 
ping it  up  was  given  to  the  Sixty-first.  The  battalion  that  had  been 
attached  to  the  Ninetieth  Division  Mas  retm-ned  to  (ieneral  Castner 
and  early  on  the  3rd  Captain  Olmstead  turned  the  men  of  the  fii-st 
battalion  of  the  Sixty-first  eastward  to  march  across  the  Punchbowl 
to  the  INIeuse.  Machine  gun  and  one-pounder  fire  greeted  the  lines 
as  they  pushed  down  the  slopes  on  the  interior  of  the  l)owl.  From 
Doulcon,  from  the  patch  of  trees  on  the  southwest  slope  of  the  central 
mount  and  from  Ferme  de  Jupille  on  the  northern  rim  there  was  a 
three-cornered  fire.  The  Ninetieth's  progress  in  Bois  de  Sassey 
silenced  the  guns  on  the  north  and  our  own  advance  throttled  the 
resisters  on  the  Cote  216.  The  Bodies  evacuated  Doulcon.  Company 
C,  led  by  Lieutenant  Edwin  A.  Smith,  entered  the  town  about  1 1 
o'clock.  The  enemy  artillei-y  east  of  the  Meuse  bombarded  it  heavily 
all  day  and  there  were  bursts  of  fire  throughout  the  night.  Under 
protection  of  the  darkness  our  outposts  were  established  along  the 
river  banks.  The  Germans  had  been  forced  to  abandon  large  quan- 
tities of  stores  in  Doulcon.  Several  million  feet  of  lumber  and 
extensive  railroad  yards  were  among  the  spoils. 

The  sector  front  now  faced  the  Meuse  from  one  flank  to  the 
other.     The  Ninth  Brigade  had  occupied  approximately  twenty-five 


The  Advance  to  the  Meiise  197 

square  kilometers  in  its  week's  work,  inchiding  four  towns,  all  hous- 
ing large  depots  of  valuable  war  stores.  The  advance  had  been  so 
rapid  that  even  the  fifteen  hundred  replacements,  who  were  used 
mostly  as  carriers,  often  could  not  get  food  brought  up  to  the  fighting 
men.  The  effective  fighting  strength  was  low  and  the  surgeons  re- 
ported that  more  than  half  of  the  doughboys  should  be  evacuated. 
Nevertheless  the  men  refused  to  quit.  Morale  was  good,  the  Hun 
was  being  beaten,  and  hundreds  of  our  men  hung  on  thi'ough  grit 
alone.  Ex])osure  and  three  weeks  of  almost  continuous  fighting  and 
sleeping  in  mud  and  rain  did  not  make  them  give  up,  although  they 
were  not  more  than  half  their  former  selves  in  fighting  efficiency. 


Chapter  VI 


CROSSING  THE  MEUSE 

I 

TTH   both  brigades   fjiciiig  the  river   from   Bri*^- 

Dun,    the    sole    task 


ulles  to  opposite  Dun,  the  sole  task  of  the 
Division  was  the  crossing  of  the  JVIeuse.  Onr 
l)Ianes,  very  active  despite  the  rain  and  fogs  that 
slirouded  the  valleys,  reported  on  the  2nd  of 
Xo\enil)er  that  the  roads  east  of  the  river  were 
crowded  with  north-moving  trains  of  ti-ncks, 
wagons  and  liea\  y  artillery.  Smoke  from  many 
fii-es  in  the  hills  could  be  seen  from  our  observa- 
tion posts.  Immediate  crossing  t(j  the  eastern  banks  was  essential. 
The  Tenth  Brigade  was  directed  to  put  its  patrols  across  the  river 
and  canal  without  fail  during  the  night  of  the  2nd,  to  find  out  the 
extent  of  the  German  withdrawal  and  to  prepare  the  way  for  the 
crossing  of  the  entire  Division. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Hodges  (promoted  October  31st),  occupy- 
ing Brieulles  and  the  hills  south  of  the  town  with  the  second  battalion 
of  the  Sixth,  sent  out  two  patrols  at  nightfall  to  undertake  the  cross- 
ing. At  midnight  orders  came  to  foi-ce  the  jjassage  with  two  com- 
panies. Lieutenant  Colonel  Hodges  moved  his  P.  C.  to  Brieulles  at 
once  to  supervise  the  task  and  brought  Companies  E  and  G  up  from 
Bois  de  Brieulles  to  carry  out  the  mission.  Company  F  of  the 
Seventh  Engineers  had  drilled  for  a  few  hours  with  a  new  type  of 
pontoon  footbridge  designed  by  the  Engineer  Corps  and  which  was 
here  to  receive  its  first  practical  test.  The  material  was  hurried  up 
to  Brieulles  to  cojnmence  at  once  the  crossing.  The  forces  proceeded 
up  the  river  and  began  the  construction  of  the  footbridge  on  the 
southern  point  of  the  Meuse's  curve  in  toward  the  town.  The  night 
was  black  and  rainy  and  the  work  proceeded  without  attracting  the 
attention  of  the  enemy,  not  more  than  two  hundred  meters  away  on 
the  hill  beyond  the  canal.  Company  F  of  the  Engineers  was  build- 
ing the  bridge,  under  the  supervision  of  Lieutenant  Harold  F.  Beyer, 


Crossing  the  Meuse  201 

while  details  from  Company  D  of  the  Engineers  undertook  to  row 
patrols  of  Company  E  of  the  Sixth  across  the  stream,  probably 
twenty-five  meters  wide  and  five  feet  deep  at  this  point.  The  bridge 
was  completed  just  at  dawn.  Company  E,  commanded  by  Captain 
Marcus  D.  O'Neal,  was  forming  east  of  the  bridge  and  the  engineers 
were  preparing  to  carry  over  the  equipment  to  bridge  the  canal. 
Suddenly  there  was  a  storm  of  machine  gun  bullets  from  the  east. 
The  Germans  had  discovered  the  movement.  The  bridge  and  the 
whole  vicinity  was  bathed  in  lead.  The  desultory  artillery  fire  on 
Brieulles  was  increased  to  a  heavy  bombardment.  Caught  in  the  flat 
open  bottom  between  river  and  canal  the  doughboys  and  engineers 
ran  across  the  hundred  meter  space  for  the  high  bank  of  the  canal. 
There  the  Boche  on  the  hill  above  them  could  not  see  them  nor  sweep 
them  with  fire.  All  day  long  the  men  hugged  the  canal  bank,  daring 
not  to  venture  out.  The  enemy's  ever-watchful  machine  gunners 
controlled  the  whole  stretch  of  valley  and  movement  meant  destruc- 
tion. It  was  certain  tliat  there  had  been  no  withdrawal  from  the  east 
bank  of  the  Meuse,  and  the  Hun  evidently  intended  to  hold  on  at  all 
costs.  The  orders  of  the  defenders  were  later  captured:  "The  enemy's 
crossing  of  the  Meuse  is  to  be  prevented  absolutely.  Should  he  suc- 
ceed he  is  to  be  thrown  back  into  the  Meuse  at  once.  The  enemj-  must 
not  get  a  foothold  on  this  side  of  the  Meuse  under  any  circumstances." 
Nevertheless  we  had  crossed  the  ]Meuse.    The  canal  still  lay  before  us. 

The  reconnaissance  of  our  aviators  of  the  8Hth  Squadron,  who 
worked  through  the  fog  and  rain,  showed  that  tlie  Boche  were  leaving 
the  areas  as  rapidh'  as  they  could  move  out  their  stores,  holding  on 
to  the  crossings,  however,  to  the  last  to  make  good  their  escape.  The 
report  at  2  p.  m.  of  the  3rd  was:  "The  Boche  are  in  full  retreat  east 
of  the  Meuse.  All  the  northbouiid  roads  are  packed  with  troops, 
artillery  and  trucks.  Roads  running  southwest  of  Remoiville  are 
choked  with  traffic.  At  Remoiville  a  troop  train  of  nineteen  cars 
going  out,  and  a  great  crowd  of  Boche  at  the  siding.  We  dove  on 
these  troops  and  fired  about  2,000  rounds  of  ammunition.  A  Boche 
machine  gun  fired  upon  us,  using  incendiary  bullets.  The  maj)  we 
had  was  too  far  back  and  so  we  could  not  locate  ourselves ;  but  we 
flew  fifteen  minutes  north  of  this  place  and  practically  all  the  roads 
are  filled  with  northbound  traffic.  Small  fires,  probably  ammunition, 
around  Remoiville.  A  number  of  small  amnuinition  fires  seen 
throughout  this  country.  Boche  evidently  in^^^,  great  hurry.  Much 
confusion  seems  to  reign  on  roads." 

At  3:30  p.  M.  the  Field  Order  issued  three  days  before  for  the 
crossing  of  the  Meuse  and  the  pursuit  of  the  enemy  was  put  into 


Crossing  the  Meuse  203 

effect.  All  the  artillery  was  pushed  up  to  shoot  as  far  as  possible  into 
the  enemy's  country.  The  Tenth  Field  Artillery,  acting  directly 
with  the  Tenth  Brigade,  was  behind  Brieulles,  while  one  accompany- 
ing gun  was  put  on  the  spur  just  southeast  of  the  town  to  fire  direct 
on  the  enemj',  not  seven  hundred  meters  distant.  The  Seventy-sixth, 
supporting  the  Ninth  Brigade,  had  its  7.5's  near  Clery-le-Grand.  The 
Seventy-seventh,  the  other  light  regiment,  took  position  south  of 
Clery-Ie-Grand  and  the  l;5.5's,  the  Thirteenth  and  Eighteenth,  located 
near  Cunel.  Division  Headquarters  opened  at  Cunel  at  midnight 
of  the  3rd-4.th. 

Two  trains  of  heavy  French  pontoon  equipage  back  in  Bois 
de  Cuisy,  near  Montfaucon,  were  borrowed  from  the  Thirty-third 
French  Corps  and  were  started  forward  under  the  guidance  of  the 
Seventh  Engineers.  This  ecpiipment  was  to  be  used  in  building  bridges 
for  the  artillery  and  trains  as  soon  as  the  infantry,  crossing  by  the 
footbridges,  had  established  themselves  across  the  canal.  It  was  of 
prime  importance  that  the  crossing  be  forced  and  that  our  troops  be 
ready  to  ad\'ance  and  storm  the  heights  before  the  enemy's  artillery, 
which  had  so  long  been  punishing  us,  could  be  pulled  out. 

The  patrols  of  the  Sixth  and  Sixtieth  Infantry  and  parties  of 
the  Seventh  Engineers  had  made  thorough  examination  of  the  river 
banks  for  suitable  bridge  sites.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Hodges  had 
reconnoitered  the  stream  up  to  the  north  of  Brieulles.  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Morton  and  Major  Hoge  of  the  Seventh  Engineers  had 
reconnoitered  the  entire  length  of  the  river  from  opposite  Doulcon 
to  Brieulles.  Lieutenant  Alfred  Jacquin,  the  French  Engineer 
attached  to  the  Seventh  Engineers,  and  whose  long  black  beard  and 
horizon-blue  helmet  were  seen  at  the  front  in  every  engagement  of 
the  Fifth  Division  from  Frapelle  to  the  end,  here  won  the  American 
D.  S.  C.  by  his  feai'less  reconnaissances  imder  heavy  fire. 

There  were  few  points  suitable  for  a  crossing,  and  the  footbridge 
constructed  on  the  night  of  the  2nd  had  been  erected  at  the  most 
favorable  point.  Proceeding  upstream  southeast  of  Brieulles  the 
river  turned  eastward  and  closed  over  to  the  canal,  within  a  hundred 
meters  of  the  groimd  held  by  the  enemy.  The  entire  basin  from  half 
a  kilometer  below  Brieulles  northward  was  flooded,  forming  a  marsh, 
600  to  800  meters  wide.  There  was  therefore  less  than  1,500  meters 
of  river  front  where  the  Tenth  Brigade  could  cross,  and  all  this  front 
was  visible  throughout  the  day  to  the  enemy,  hidden  in  Bois  de  Chatil- 
lon  and  scattered  bushes  on  the  east  banks  of  the  canal.  The  Meuse 
was  bridged,  but  the  more  difficult  problem  of  crossing  the  canal,  a 


Crossing  the  Meuse  205 

steep-banked,  unfordable  stream,  twenty  meters  wide  and  five  to  ten 
feet  deep,  still  remained. 

All  along  the  Division  front  of  eight  kilometers  from  the  Bois 
de  Chatillon  to  Dun-sur-lVIeuse  the  Germans  were  almost  impreg- 
nably  located  on  the  high  hills  that  rose  directly  from  the  Canal  de 
I'Est.  In  the  northwest  edges  of  Bois  de  Chatillon  was  Cote  252, 
sheltering  one-pounders  and  machine  guns  that  covered  every  foot  of 
the  Meuse  basin  within  a  radius  of  two  kilometers  and  swept  Brie- 
ulles.  Just  north  of  Cote  252  were  the  lesser  twin  heights  228. 
Twelve  hundred  meters  fm-ther  north  was  the  village  of  Liny-devant- 
Dun  in  a  deep  valley  overlooked  by  the  great  Hill  260  opposite 
Clery-le-Petit.  The  next  succeeding  height  was  Cote  292,  or  Cote  de 
Jumont,  whose  scattered  woods  contained  guns  that  could  sweep 
Clery-Ie-Petit,  Doulcon.  and  even  the  rear  areas  of  the  Punchbowl. 
The  last  northern  height  was  the  round-topped  hill  on  which  was  situ- 
ated Dun-sur-Meuse. 

As  soon  as  the  enemy's  vision  was  blinded  by  nightfall  of  Novem- 
ber .3rd,  Company  G  of  the  Sixth  Infantry,  led  by  Lieutenant  James 
D.  Case)',  was  filtered  across  the  BrieuUes  footbridge  to  reinforce 
Company  E  under  the  canal  bank.  The  Boche  was  not  aroused;  he 
had  taken  the  men  in  the  river  basin  in  the  early  morning  for  daring 
patrols,  and  the  absolute  quiet  of  the  detaclmients  next  the  canal 
throughout  the  day  had  led  him  to  believe  that  all  the  Americans  had 
gone  back  west  of  the  river.  So  the  activities  proceeded  on  the  night 
of  the  3rd  without  discovery.  During  the  day  Company  E  of  the 
Sixth  and  the  Engineers  had  worked  down  the  canal  six  hundred 
meters  with  their  bridge  material  to  a  point  where  the  Germans  had 
destroj^ed  an  iron  bridge  across  the  stream.  Here  on  the  east  side 
was  a  cove  or  pocket  in  the  slope  two  or  three  hundred  meters  deep 
and  well  stocked  with  enemy  machine  gun  nests,  but  which  if  once 
taken  by  our  men  would  shelter  them  from  machine  gun  fire  from 
both  north  and  south.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Hodges  directed  the 
building  of  two  footbridges,  one  on  either  side  of  the  ruined  bridge, 
for  the  crossing  of  the  companies  which  would  then  seize  and  clear 
the  pocket.  He  moved  Company  F  to  a  position  behind  the  railroad 
fill  east  of  Brieulles  and  Company  H  to  the  southeastern  edge  of  the 
town.  Work  on  the  two  l)ridges  proceeded  rapidly  and  undisturbed 
under  the  hostile  guns  not  fifty  meters  away. 

Lieutenant  Beyers  of  the  Engineers  had  one  bridge  completed 
shortly  after  midnight  and  the  other  was  finished  about  2  a.  m.  A 
patrol  of  eight  men  was  just  across  on  the  German  side  when  the 
Boche  woke  up.     From  both  flanks  and  from  two  nests  directly  in 


Crossiuy  the  Meu^e  207 

front  burst  forth  a  terrific  fire,  sweeping  the  bridges  and  combing  the 
canal  bank.  The  party  on  the  bridge  was  forced  back  by  the  hail  of 
bullets,  but  efforts  were  concentrated  to  silence  the  resistance.  Stokes 
mortars  dropped  their  explosives  on  the  hill  and  rifle  grenades  were 
directed  toward  the  strongliolds.  The  entire  ammunition  supply  was 
finally  exhausted,  yet  the  machine  guns  liad  not  been  silenced;  their 
emplacements  could  not  be  accurately  spotted  in  the  darkness.  More 
Stokes  ammimition  was  sent  for  but  it  did  not  arrive  in  time.  All  the 
rifle  grenades  in  the  support  companies  were  collected  and  sent  for- 
ward, with  extra  rifle  and  Chauchat  ammunition.  Lieutenant  Colonel 
Hodges  crossed  the  river  and  took  command  of  the  firing  line  to  make 
one  last  supreme  eft'ort  before  daylight.  The  canal  bank  was  sud- 
denly manned  and  a  terrific  fire  brought  to  l)ear  on  the  enemy  with 
every  weapon  at  hand,  on  every  close  point  thought  to  contain  ma- 
chine guns.  By  this  time  the  enemy  was  fully  aware  of  what  was 
going  on  and  all  his  forces  were  concentrated  on  the  defense  of  the 
canal.  The  bridge  was  so  constantly  and  thoroughly  covered  that 
crossing  was  utterly  impossible. 

So  through  the  day  of  the  4th  this  small  force  of  infantry  and 
engineers  continued  to  hug  the  canal  bank  where  they  had  been  since 
early  on  the  .3rd.  The  Tenth  Field  Artillery  had  been  shelling  Bois 
de  Chatillon  and  the  top  of  the  ridge  running  north,  but  on  the  4th 
General  ISIalone  had  the  fire  brought  clear  down  the  slope  to  the 
water's  edge,  with  only  a  deep  notch  in  the  curtain  at  the  bridges  to 
insure  safety  to  the  companies  there.  I^ieutenant  Hayes,  the  artillery 
liaison  officer  with  the  Sixth,  directed  this  fire  from  the  heavily  l)om- 
bai'ded  old  church  tower  in  Brieulles  with  telling  accuracy.  At  ;> 
r.  >r.,  just  after  dusk,  the  liarrage  suddenly  lifted;  the  two  infantry 
comjjanies  opened  up  a  torrent  of  fire  with  every  weapon  and  then 
rushed  the  bridges.  The  lower  bridge  had  been  almost  shot  to  pieces 
by  the  hostile  guns,  but  the  men  waded  Avaist-deep  over  the  sections 
where  two  pontoons  were  sunk.  Practically  all  the  Company  E  men 
led  l)y  Captain  O'Neal  and  one  platoon  of  I.,ieutenant  Casey's  Com- 
pany G  reached  the  eastern  bank.  Firing  as  they  advanced  tlie  units 
deployed  and  puslied  on  into  tlie  pocket,  cleaning  up  the  ground  to 
the  front  and  to  either  flank.  The  machine  gun  nests  were  all  wiped 
out,  nine  prisoners  were  taken,  a  bridgehead  was  established  and  the 
force  was  safe  in  the  cove.  We  had  gained  our  first  foothold  across 
the  INIeuse. 

But  for  some  unaccountable  reason,  just  as  the  crossing  had  been 
successfully  accomplished  shots  from  our  own  heavy  French  batteries 
began  falling  short  and  struck  all  around  the  bridgehead,  causing 


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Crossing  the  Meuse  209 

casualties.  Two  or  three  shells  fell  in  the  canal  and  hoth  bridges  were 
broken.  Captain  O'Neal  and  Lieutenant  Casey  bravely  went  back 
out  into  the  open  and  assisted  by  the  engineers  repaired  them  under 
the  fire  that  still  raked  the  bridges  from  both  flanks.  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Hodges  rushed  the  rest  of  his  battalion  across  and  sent  back 
to  headquarters  the  tidings  that  the  crossing  was  a  fact.  General 
Malone  immediately  ordered  the  entire  Tenth  Brigade  to  cross  before 
dawn  and  extend  the  bridgehead  in  all  directions.  Lieutenant  Colonel 
Hodges  at  once  pushed  his  command  .500  meters  forward  and  300 
meters  to  either  flank,  thus  covering  the  crossing  of  the  rest  of  the 
brigade.  Every  trace  of  the  enemy  was  cleaned  out.  Nine  machine 
guns  and  two  minenwerfers  that  had  defended  this  part  of  the  stream 
were  taken;  twenty-one  Boche  were  in  our  hands  and  several  were 
dead  from  our  rush.  The  battalion  had  lost  Lieutenant  Raymond  G. 
Hollister  and  19  men.  One  oflicer  and  47  men  were  wounded.  Our 
losses  were  astonishingly  small  in  view  of  the  positions  of  the  enemy, 
and  the  defensive  organization  which  he  had  installed. 

Meanwhile,  Lieutenant  Hartman  with  the  third  battalion  of  the 
Sixth  had  come  up  from  Bois  de  Septsarges  in  the  afternoon  to  cross 
farther  south  and  clean  out  Bois  de  Chatillon.  In  preparation  for 
his  crossing  long  telegraph  poles  had  been  lashed  together  and  rafts 
and  duckboards  built.  Leaving  Company  M  in  rear,  the  remainder 
of  the  battalion  and  a  platoon  of  Company  B,  Fifteenth  Machine 
Gun  Battalion,  crossed  the  river  on  the  footbridge  already  built  and 
approached  the  canal  about  the  time  that  I^ieutenant  Colonel  Hodges 
made  his  attack  on  the  bridgehead.  With  the  enemy's  attention  cen- 
tered on  the  fighting  to  the  north  Lieutenant  Hartman  got  his  rafts 
and  poles  into  position  across  the  canal  some  four  hundred  meters 
al)()ve  the  second  battalion's  bridges.  By  8  o'clock  in  the  evening  the 
third  battalion  was  on  the  east  side  of  the  canal.  They  were  still  un- 
discovered, although  the  whole  area  was  subject  to  shelling.  Com- 
pany I  led  tlie  advance  southward  along  the  bank  of  the  stream. 
Three  hundred  yards  up  the  line  of  thin  woods  the  van  came  upon 
a  machine  gun.  One  man  of  our  leading  company  was  killed  and 
another  wounded,  l)ut  the  nest  was  outflanked  and  the  gun  and 
twenty-two  prisoners  were  captiu'ed.  The  forces  then  left  tlie  canal 
bank  and  climl)ed  the  hill,  establishing  themselves  on  Cote  262,  taking 
in  the  ascent  another  gun  and  its  crew  of  three  men. 

Dispositions  were  made  for  the  attack  on  Bois  de  Chatillon; 
Company  I  formed  the  right,  L  the  left  and  K  the  support.  At  6 
o'clock  on  the  morning  of  the  ^th  the  battalion  penetrated  the  woods. 
Machine  guns  resisted  from  hidden  emplacements  in  the  underbrush 


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Crossing  the  Me  use  211 

and  before  they  were  overcome  ten  of  Lieutenant  Hartman's  men 
were  killed  and  thirty  wounded.  By  7:30  a.  m.  the  woods  had  been 
swept  out  and  the  lines  were  at  the  further  edge  of  Liny-Vilosnes 
road,  almost  two  kilometers  from  the  canal.  Ninety-six  prisoners, 
24  heavy  and  45  light  machine  guns,  6  minenwerfers  and  10  one- 
pounders  taken  in  the  swift  sin-prise  attack  indicated  the  strength  and 
organization  of  the  defense  that  had  been  shattered.  The  three  vic- 
torious companies  manned  the  edges  of  the  wood  and  began  digging 
in.  The  entire  Tenth  Brigade  was  across  the  Meuse  and  canal  by 
dawn  of  the  .5th,  and  was  ready  for  attack. 

II 

The  Ninth  Bi-igade  had  not  been  successful  in  its  efforts  to  cross 
the  Meuse  on  the  4th.  Plans  were  to  send  over  on  footbridges  a  kilo- 
meter northeast  of  Clery-le-Petit  a  battalion  from  each  regiment,  to 
clear  up  the  east  banks  and  conquer  the  western  slopes  of  Hill  200 
and  Cote  292,  between  Liny  and  Dun.  The  first  and  second  bat- 
talions of  the  Sixtieth  were  placed  in  Clery-le-Petit  during  the  night 
of  the  3rd.  while  the  third  battalion  was  moved  to  Clery-le-(irand. 
The  second  battalion  of  the  Sixty-first  joined  the  second  battalion  of 
the  Sixtieth  north  of  Clery-le-Petit  to  attempt  the  crossing.  It  was 
the  intention  to  try  to  bridge  the  river  dm'ing  the  night  of  November 
3rd  and  the  infantry  was  waiting,  but  the  light  French  pontoons  com- 
ing from  Bois  de  Septsarges  did  not  arrive  till  broad  daylight.  It 
was  not  till  afternoon  that  sufficient  material  arrived  to  construct  a 
bridge.  'J'he  enemy  was  very  quiet  all  day,  even  during  our  recon- 
naissance of  the  river  banks  in  the  early  morning,  and  it  appeared 
that  the  Germans  had  abandoned  the  hills  on  the  other  side.  The 
attempt  to  force  a  crossing  was  begun. 

The  Seventy-sixth,  General  Castner's  attached  ai-fillery,  had 
been  bombarding  the  western  slopes  of  260  and  292  all  day.  Just 
before  the  bridging  was  commenced  all  our  machine  guns  opened  up 
and  the  artillery  fire  increased,  searching  the  hills  for  hidden  enemy 
positions.  At  4  p.  m.,  the  selected  hour,  the  forces  moved  down  to  the 
river,  to  cross  in  full  view  of  the  enemy.  Company  B  of  the  Seventh 
Engineers,  under  the  command  of  Cajitain  R.  W.  Wenzell,  brought 
down  their  pontoons  and  began  a  footbridge  just  north  of  that  point 
where  the  Meuse  is  joined  by  the  canal.  Major  Stark  (just  pro- 
moted) and  Captain  John  B.  Warfield  placed  their  infantry  bat- 
talions along  the  shore  to  protect  the  engineers  and  to  rush  the  cross- 
ing as  soon  as  possible.    No  sooner  had  the  engineers  brought  their 


Crossing  the  Metise  213 

pontoons  out  into  the  open  and  begun  floating  them  than  all  sorts  of 
hostile  fire  came  down  on  the  working  parties.  The  men  went  coolly 
and  steadily  on  with  their  work  despite  artillery,  one-pounders,  ma- 
chine guns  and  snipers.  Almost  as  fast  as  the  pontoon  boats  were 
put  into  position  they  were  cut  away  and  sunk  by  the  awful  con- 
centration of  bursting  steel.  Men  fell  everywhere  under  the  direct 
fire.  Captain  Warfield  was  killed  by  shrapnel  at  the  head  of  his  bat- 
talion. The  losses  were  six  slain  and  seventy  wounded.  By  nightfall 
the  supply  of  boats  was  exhausted  and  the  forces  had  to  desist  until 
more  pontoons  arrived. 

With  the  coming  of  darkness  the  Ninth  Brigade  and  the  En- 
gineers moved  a  kilometer  farther  up  the  river  and  resumed  the  at- 
tempt to  force  the  crossing  at  that  point  where  the  Meuse  flowed 
nearest  the  cliffs,  southeast  of  Clery-le-Petit.  The  second  battalions 
of  the  Sixtieth  and  Sixty-first  had  suffered  so  much  in  the  afternoon's 
fighting  that  General  Castner  ordered  the  third  battalions  of  the  two 
regiments,  commanded  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  ]McClm"e  and  ^Nlajor 
Barker,  to  continue  the  operation  that  evening.  Colonel  Peyton  of 
the  Sixty-first  was  placed  in  direct  command  of  the  troops  on  the  river. 
Lieutenant  Henry  H.  Jones,  with  Company  M  of  the  Sixty-first,  was 
to  cover  the  work  of  the  engineers  in  their  construction  of  the  foot- 
bridge over  the  Meuse  and  of  the  two  bridges  over  the  Canal  de  I'Est. 
Company  M  was  to  form  the  bridgehead  and  to  protect  the  crossing. 
Lieutenant  Jones  jjlacing  parts  of  his  company  on  either  side  of  the 
canal.  The  companies  of  the  Sixtieth  and  Sixty-first  were  to  alter- 
nate in  crossing  the  river  bridge,  after  which  the  Sixtieth  was  to  use 
the  southern  canal  bridge  and  the  Sixty-first  the  northern. 

Xight  hid  every  activity  of  our  forces  and  the  Boche  did  not 
realize  that  the  site  farther  north  had  been  abandoned.  AVith  more 
bridge  material  at  hand  Company  D  of  the  Seventh  Engineers  under 
Captain  Joseph  Laracy.  and  under  the  personal  supervision  of  Lieu- 
tenant Colonel  INIorton,  threw  their  bridge  over  the  JNIeuse.  The 
construction  was  completed  shortly  after  midnight  and  the  engineers 
and  Company  INI  of  the  Sixty-first  hurried  eastward  across  the  basin. 
The  Engineers  began  the  two  footbridges  on  the  canal.  Far  to  the 
south  the  workers  could  hear  the  steady  rattle  of  machine  guns  and 
incessant  reports  of  rifle  fire  where  the  Tenth  Brigade  was  establish- 
ing its  bridgehead.  To  the  north  an  occasional  rocket  went  up  and 
machine  guns  intermittently  sputtered  where  the  Boche  were  still 
suspiciously  watching  the  scene  of  the  afternoon's  fighting. 

The  enemy  was  still  present  in  force  opposite  the  Ninth  Brigade, 
and  no  sooner  were  the  engineers  discovered  attempting  to  bridge 


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Crossing  the  Me  use  215 

the  canal  than  tlie  whole  area  was  drenched  with  seemingly  inex- 
haustible fire  from  the  heights.  However,  the  engineers  took  advan- 
tage of  every  slight  shift  in  the  streams  of  machine  gun  bullets  and 
their  persistency  resulted  in  the  completion  of  one  bridge  shorth' 
before  daybreak.  The  second  bridge  was  repeatedly  destroyed  after 
each  attempt  to  repair  it.  The  bridgehead  detachment  was  able  to 
cross  the  canal  and  tlie  remaining  companies  of  the  two  battalions 
were  filtering  into  the  bottom  between  river  and  canal,  a  flooded  area 
full  of  marshes  and  covered  with  thorned  brush.  Advance  throuah 
the  jungled  swamjjs  was  made  more  difficult  by  the  enemy's  throw- 
ing up  flares  to  locate  our  troops. 

Da\\7i  of  November  .5th  found  the  third-battalion  of  the  Sixtieth 
and  Companies  I  and  ]M  of  the  Sixty-first  across  the  Meuse.  In 
addition  to  the  bridgehead  detachment  only  parts  of  the  two  Com- 
pany I's  had  crossed  the  broken  canal  bridges,  which  with  the  increas- 
ing light  of  day  became  the  targets  for  more  accurate  and  more 
intense  fire.  The  situation  was  dangerous  for  the  two  battalions 
there  in  the  river  flat,  for  the  forces  were  at  the  mercy  of  the  enemy, 
strong  in  his  heights. 

Captain  Edward  ().  Allworth  of  the  Sixtieth  saw  his  comj^any 
before  him  struggling  to  complete  its  crossing  of  the  canal.  Lieu- 
tenant Morrison  was  leading  two  platoons  against  the  fortified  slopes 
of  Hill  260;  the  rest  of  the  company  was  west  of  the  canal,  facing 
the  half-sunken  bridges  and  a  tornado  of  bullets.  To  save  the  day 
Captain  Allworth  mounted  the  canal  bank  and  rallied  the  ranks. 
Calling  on  his  men  to  follow  he  plunged  into  the  water,  swam  to  the 
opposite  shore  and  then  dashed  up  the  hill  to  the  head  of  his  com- 
pany. Under  his  leadership,  his  men  and  some  men  of  the  Sixtj^- 
first  conquered  the  broad  northern  base  of  Hill  260  and  wrested 
over  a  kilometer  from  the  enemy,  overcoming  the  thickly  set  machine- 
gun  nests,  taking  one  hundred  captives,  more  than  he  had  men  in  his 
command.  Likewise  Captain  Fisher  of  the  Sixty-first  had  rallied  his 
Company  I  and  charged  Cote  292  farther  north.  The  bridgehead 
was  w^on  foi-  the  IVinth  Brigade.  Captain  Allworth  was  awarded  the 
Congressional  Medal  of  Honor  for  his  gallant  achievement. 

The  Engineers  coolly  set  to  work  rejjairing  the  canal  bridge 
despite  the  concentration  of  enemy  fire  that  was  still  directed  on  the 
west  bank  of  the  canal  from  more  distant  jjoints.  One  bridge  was 
made  from  the  damageil  two.  For  a  while  men  of  Engineer  Com- 
pany D  heroically  supported  sections  of  the  leaky  pontoon  bridge 
b}'  standing  shoulder  deep  in  the  cold  water  and  holding  uj)  the 


^ 


Crossing  the  Meuse  217 

flooring  so  that  their  comrades  of  the  Sixtieth  and  Sixty-first  could 
cross. 

Ill 

With  the  river  jiassed,  the  stronghold  of  Dun-sur-]Meiise  became 
the  all-important  objective.  To  both  General  ]Maloiie  and  General 
Castner,  General  Ely  had  said:  "Push  north  with  what  troops  you 
have  and  take  Dun  at  once.  Do  not  wait  on  the  other  brigade  but 
go  ahead  and  take  Dun."  The  whole  Division's  energies  were  bent 
toward  seizing  the  eastern  heights  and  paralyzing  the  enemy  before 
he  could  escajje.  Simultaneous  with  the  success  of  the  rush  of  Lieu- 
tenant Colonel  Hodges'  battalion  across  the  canal  at  dusk  on  the 
4th,  Companies  A  and  C,  Seventh  Engineers,  under  command  of 
Major  Hoge,  began  the  construction  of  a  wagon  pontoon  bridge, 
using  the  French  train  which  had  been  brought  up.  At  1  a.  m.  a 
wagon  bridge  was  completed  across  both  river  and  canal  despite  the 
heavy  and  accurate  shelling.  Captain  H.  R.  McAdams  of  the  En- 
gineers, though  severely  wounded,  refused  to  be  evacuated  and  calmly 
continued  to  direct  his  work.  A  combat  wagon  of  the  Eleventh  In- 
fantry was  the  first  American  vehicle  to  cross  the  INIeuse  in  the  pursuit 
of  the  Hun,  made  possible  only  by  the  sujierb  work  of  the  Engineers, 
especially  due  to  Colonel  Paules,  Major  Hoge  and  Captain  Mc- 
Adams. 

The  entire  Tenth  Brigade  was  across  the  river  and  canal  and  in 
jjosition  for  further  attack  b\'  daj'light  of  the  5th.  As  soon  as  Lieu- 
tenant Colonel  Hodges  reported  the  bridgehead  established  the 
Eleventh  Infantry  was  started  across  the  river.  That  regiment  had 
on  October  30th  acquired  a  new  commanding  officer.  Colonel  Robert 
H.  Peck,  who  believed  in  personal  leadership  and  had  all  the  dash 
and  daring  necessarj^  to  lead  his  men  to  striking  achievements.  Major 
Birmingham's  battalion  was  across  shortly  after  midnight  and  was 
pushing  northward  toward  Liny-devant-Dun,  its  left  on  the  canal 
banks  and  its  right  reaching  over  Hill  228.  The  second  battalion, 
commanded  by  Captain  Cowart,  moved  on  the  right  as  support  and 
Cajitain  Harris'  first  battalion  followed  as  brigade  reserve.  The 
crossing  of  the  Avhole  Tenth  Brigade  was  thus  completed,  for  Captain 
Reiser's  battalion  of  the  Sixth  had  already  moved  over  and  had  taken 
position  on  the  northwest  of  Hill  228. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  West  was  at  the  head  of  the  third  battalion 
with  Major  Birmingham  as  the  lines  enveloped  Liny  and  took  over 
a  half  a  hundred  prisoners.  The  two  leading  battalions  surged  on 
up  the  deep  valley  to  the  northeast  of  the  village  and  mounted  the 


oo 


5Ji 


Crossing  the  Meuse  219 

southern  slope  of  Hill  260,  driving  the  Bodies  northward  and  win- 
ning the  height.  Lieutenant  J.  E.  Cates  topped  the  crest  with  Com- 
pany K,  the  van  of  the  battalion,  before  8  o'clock,  at  practically  the 
same  time  that  Captain  Alhvorth  was  winning  the  northern  base 
of  the  hill. 

Then  came  the  order  from  General  Ely  to  General  Malone 
directing  that  the  Tenth  Brigade  disregard  previous  plans  and  orders 
to  advance  northeastward,  but  that  the  forces  should  strike  for  Dun- 
sur-Meuse,  which  was  four  kilometers  to  the  north  and  in  the  sector 
of  the  Ninth  Brigade.  This  order  was  immediately  transmitted  to 
the  Eleventh  Infantry  and  Colonel  Peck  faced  his  regiment  from 
east  to  north  and  started  the  advance  on  Dun.  The  Tenth  Brigade 
had  been  sent  against  Dun  because  at  the  time  it  was  not  kno^vn 
that  the  Ninth  Brigade  had  successfully  transferred  so  many  of  its 
troops  to  the  east  side  of  the  canal. 

The  third  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth  and  the  second  and  third  of 
the  Sixty-first  all  had  succeeded  in  crossing,  however,  and  Colonel 
Peyton  took  charge  of  the  mixed  regiment.  Colonel  McClure's  bat- 
talion of  the  Sixty-first  attacked  Cote  de  Jumont.  The  hill  was  forti- 
fied with  countless  machine  guns  which  covered  every  possible  angle 
of  approach  and  rendered  the  height  well-nigh  impregnable.  Never- 
theless, the  Americans  charged  directly  and  the  Boche  gave  up.  Cote 
de  Jumont  was  topped,  with  many  prisoners,  machine  guns  and  one- 
pounders.  Closely  following  the  third  battalion  was  Major  Stark's 
battalion  of  the  Sixty-first.  Leaving  Colonel  McClure's  men  organ- 
izing and  mopping  up  the  hill,  Major  Stark  pushed  on  up  the  river 
against  Dun. 

Colonel  Peck  with  the  Eleventh  around  Liny  had  himself  taken 
charge  of  the  first  battalion  and  was  pushing  north  toward  Dun,  past 
the  western  edges  of  Bois  de  Bussy,  and  Bois  de  Chenois,  covering 
the  right  flank  of  Colonel  Peyton's  troops,  leaving  Dun  itself  to 
Colonel  Peyton.  As  the  second  battalion  of  the  Sixty-first  entered 
Dun  victoriously  at  1  p.  m.,  driving  out  the  demoralized  and  scattered 
enemy  defenders,  Colonel  Peck's  men  had  progressed  fast  and  far 
enough  to  form  the  right  of  the  line  of  three  battalions  facing  the 
Boche,  Major  Stark's  in  Dun,  Colonel  McClure's  on  northern  Cote 
de  Jumont  and  Colonel  Peck  in  Bois  de  Dun.  The  lines  merely 
passed  over  the  territory,  leaving  mopping-up  to  the  succeeding  lines ; 
it  was  almost  St.  Mihiel  again.  Boche  hid  themselves  and  then  sur- 
rendered. Only  a  few  machine  gunners  were  courageous  enough  to 
resist.  Our  dash  carried  the  day.  It  was  Private  Daniel  Erb  of 
Company  D  of  the  Eleventh  wlio  captured  single-handed  a  machine 


'-It. 


Crossing  the  Meuse  221 

gun  and  its  crew  southeast  of  Dun,  and  on  taking  his  captives  to  a 
dugout  discovered  there  forty-eight  more  Germans.  Everyone  of 
the  enemy  was  disarmed  by  this  lone  doughl)oy  and  the  half  hundred 
Boche  were  marked  up  to  his  credit.  On  a  reconnaissance  of  the 
forward  areas  Lieutenant  Colonel  McClure  sighted  a  Boche  88-mm. 
gun,  which  the  crew  was  just  limbering  up  to  pull  out.  A  soldier 
with  the  Colonel  shot  the  horses  and  the  Germans  fled  from  their  gam. 

With  Dun  taken  Major  Stark  turned  his  attack  northeastward 
across  the  wide,  flat  river  bottom  toward  Milly.  Ijieutenant  Colonel 
McClure's  third  battalion  continued  on  his  right  mopping-up  the 
western  and  northern  parts  of  Bois  de  Dun.  Artillery  from  the  hills 
farther  east  covered  the  advance  while  machine  guns  hidden  in  ]Milly 
and  on  steep  Cote  St.  Germain  sowed  the  road  with  IniUets.  The 
battalions  moved  steadily  on  despite  the  resistmice  and  the  town  was 
entered.  The  place  was  infested  with  enemy  snipers  who  continued 
to  pick  off^  our  men,  until  they  wei-e  all  sought  out  and  killed  or  cap- 
tured. For  the  night  the  lines  of  the  second  battalion  were  estab- 
lished northeast  of  Milly,  while  the  third  l)attalion  dug  in  on  the 
heights  of  Bois  de  Dun  southwest  of  the  village. 

When  Dun  was  won  by  the  Ninth  Brigade,  Colonel  Peck  re- 
formed his  regiment  and  turned  it  eastward.  The  first  battalion  was 
directed  to  march  on  IMurvaux,  but  darkness  foiuid  it  stopped  on  the 
eastern  edge  of  Bois  de  Dun  by  heavy  machine-gvm  fire,  two  kilo- 
meters due  east  of  Dun.  The  second  battalion  took  position  in  Bois 
de  Chenois  for  the  night,  while  the  third  battalion  was  in  reserve  on 
the  eastern  end  of  Hill  260.  Colonel  Peck,  going  out  toward  Mur- 
vaux  on  reconnaissance  in  the  afternoon,  ran  into  a  German  battery 
of  1.50's  on  the  Murvaux-Fontaines  road.  With  his  little  party  of  ten 
men  from  the  first  battalion  headquarters  Colonel  Peck  cut  this  x-oad, 
the  Boches'  line  of  retreat,  attacked  the  battery  and  shot  up  crew  and 
horses  so  badly  that  the  three  guns  were  abandoned  to  our  forces. 

The  end  of  the  first  day's  fighting  across  the  ]Meuse  found  the 
banks  and  the  first  series  of  heights  secure  to  our  troops  from  north 
of  Dun  to  Vilosnes,  to  which  Lieutenant  Hartman  in  Bois  de  Chatil- 
lon  sent  a  patrol  in  the  evening.  Lieutenant  Hartman's  third  bat- 
talion of  the  Sixth  had  had  a  busy  day.  Owing  to  the  necessity  of 
spreading  the  forces  out  to  hold  the  two  and  a  half  kilometer  front 
along  the  edges  of  the  wood,  the  Boches  were  able  throughout  the  day 
to  filter  small  detachments  through  oin-  tliin  lines.  Din-ing  the  eve- 
ning there  were  nine  distinct  encounters  when  the  enemy  groups  of 
three  to  ten  men  each  began  firing  with  their  machine  guns  on  our 
men.    Eight  parties  were  killed  or  captured  and  the  rest  were  driven 


Crossing  the  Meuse  223 

out  in  disorder.  An  officer  and  sixty-five  men  were  prisoners  while 
twenty  Boche  were  dead.  A  German  aviator  wlio  flew  very  low  over 
the  lines  of  Company  L  was  struck  by  rifle  fire  and  brought  down, 
pilot  dead,  on  Hill  283  in  front  of  Lieutenant  Hartman's  lines. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Ilodi^es'  battalion  was  still  grouj^ed  around 
the  bridgehead  over  the  canal  and  Captain  Reiser's  battalion  was  on 
Hill  228  ready  to  advance.  The  third  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth  was 
on  Hill  2()()  with  the  first  battalion,  which  had  crossed  tlie  river  at  4 
p.  M.^  directly  behind.  The  first  battalion  of  the  Sixty-first  and 
second  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth  were  still  west  of  the  river  in  reserve. 

At  nightfall  on  the  5th,  as  soon  as  it  was  dark  enough  to  start  the 
wagons  from  their  positions  in  readiness  at  Clery-le-Grand,  the 
second  French  hea\'y  ])()ntoon  train  was  started  for  Dun  to  commence 
the  heavy  bridge  wliich  would  permit  trucks  and  155's  to  cross.  A 
site  for  this  bridge  had  been  selected  at  the  southern  extremity  of 
Dun,  just  where  the  Meuse  separates  into  two  branches,  canal  and 
river.  Here  during  the  night  a  reinforced  pontoon  bridge  was  con- 
structed capable  of  carrying  anything  in  the  Divisional  Trains,  and 
also  all  but  the  heaviest  Corps  Artillery.  All  tlirough  the  night 
German  shells  were  falling  along  tlie  Doulcon-Dun  road  and  at  the 
sites  of  the  six  bridges  leading  into  Dun  which  the  Germans  had 
thoroughly  destroyed  before  their  retreat.  The  site  of  our  pontoon 
bridge  was  happily  chosen,  however,  and  at  0  a.  m.  on  the  (Jth  the 
bridge  was  open  for  traffic.  The  work  was  under  the  supervision  of 
Major  Swan,  who  had  under  his  command  Companies  B  and  E  of 
the  Seventh  Engineei's  and  detachments  from  the  107th  and  .'JOSth 
Engineers. 

With  this  strong  footliold  on  the  first  row  of  heights,  including 
the  three  towns,  Liny,  Dun  and  Milly — all  rich  in  captured  material 
— General  Ely  directed  the  pursuit  to  l)e  continued  without  relaxa- 
tion on  the  6th.  The  direction  of  the  drive  was  turned  northeast  and 
the  mission  was  to  clear  all  the  heights  in  the  sector.  Henceforth  our 
advance  would  he  alone;  the  Fifth  would  strike  boldly  into  the  en- 
emy's strongholds.  The  Frencli  on  oiu'  right  and  the  jSTinetieth  Divi- 
sion on  our  left  were  still  west  of  the  river.  The  128t]i  Infantry 
of  the  Thirty-second  Divsion  was  attached  to  the  Tenth  Brigade  for 
protection  of  our  right  flank.  The  battalions  that  had  fought  so  hard 
in  crossing  and  in  making  the  exhausting  attacks  on  the  lulls  were 
relieved  by  the  suj^port  battalions.  Captain  Olmstead's  first  bat- 
talion of  the  Sixty-first  crossed  the  Meuse,  replaced  Lieutenant  Col- 
onel McClure's  third  battalion  southwest  of  ISIilly  and  was  to  push  on 
toward  Cote  St.  Germain  and  IJon-devant-Dun  with  IVIajor  Stark's 


a. 


&3 


a- 


Crossing  the  Meuse  225 

second  battalion.  Major  Hewitt's  first  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth 
relieved  Major  Barker's  third  battalion.  Captain  Harris'  first  bat- 
talion formed  the  left  of  the  Eleventh  and  was  to  advance  on  INIur- 
vaux;  Captain  Cowart's  second  battalion  formed  the  right  of  the 
Eleventh  and  was  to  advance  on  Fontaines;  Major  Birmingham's 
third  battalion  was  to  advance  in  rear  of  the  second  in  support.  Cap- 
tain Reiser's  first  battalion  of  the  Sixth  was  to  attack  eastward  on  the 
Division  right.  Lieutenant  Hartman  was  to  protect  our  right  flank 
with  his  third  battalion  of  the  Sixth.  Colonel  Hodges'  second  bat- 
talion of  the  Sixth  guarding  the  bridgehead  east  of  Brieulles,  Cap- 
tain Roe's  second  battalion  of  the  Sixtieth  at  Clery-le-Grand,  the 
Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  at  Doulcon,  and  the  two  155 
regiments  west  of  the  river,  formed  the  Division  Reserve. 


Chapter  VII 
FROM  THE  MEUSE  TO  THE  EOISON 


X  seizin^'  Dun  on  its  roiiiul-topped  hill  the  Rod 
Diamond  had  taken  the  northernmost  height  on 
the  east  bank  of  the  river.  From  that  eminence, 
in  a  line  running'  east  across  the  Division  sectoi-, 
hut  with  many  wincHngs  and  convolutions,  the 
Meuse  heiglits  terminated  in  a  series  of  serrated 
hluffs.  This  escarpment  rose  from  sixty  to  a 
hundi-ed  and  fifty  meters  above  the  river  basin, 
which  to  the  north  opened  up  into  a  broad,  rolling 
plain  covered  by  the  Foret  de  Woevre.  jNIilly,  two  kilometers  north- 
east of  Dun,  and  Lion,  two  kilometers  further  in  the  same  line,  lay 
in  the  open  valley,  while  Murvaux,  four  and  a  half  kilometers  due 
east  of  Dun  snuggled  against  the  northern  face  of  the  bluffs.  There 
was  one  northern  outguard  of  the  heights,  for  rising  abruptly  on  the 
plain  between  Lion  and  jVIurvaux  was  Cote  St.  Germain,  a  saddle- 
shaped  ridge,  three  kilometers  long  and  only  sjjarsely  spotted  with 
woods.  Its  cantle  occupied  the  center  of  the  triangle  Milly-Mur- 
vaux-I^ion  and  its  pommel  rose  to  the  peak  called  le  Camp  des 
Remains,  or  Cote  350,  two  kilometers  east  of  Lion. 

For  the  most  part  the  heights  east  of  the  river  were  heavily 
wooded.  The  eastern  slopes  of  Cote  du  Jumont  were  covered  by 
Bois  de  Dun  and  Bois  de  Chenois,  which  merged  southward  into  Bois 
de  Bussy  on  the  eastern  end  of  the  long  Hill  260.  East  of  Bois  de 
Dun  and  Chenois,  bordering  the  bluffs  and  covering  the  ridges  that 
rose  to  Hill  3Jt3  southeast  of  Murvaux,  were  the  widespread  Bois 
du  Fayel  and  Les  Fonzy  Bois.  The  deep-cut  valley  between  Hills 
260  and  228,  which  sheltered  Liny,  ran  northeast  past  Bois  de  Bussy, 
with  Bois  de  I'Epinois  on  its  southeastern  side.  Three  kilometers 
above  Liny  the  \alley  swung  sharply  at  right  angles  to  the  south- 
east, and  half  a  kilometer  farther  up  sheltered  Fontaines.  Above 
and  east  of  Fontaines  the  valley  forked  three  ways  and  its  branches 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  229 

lost  themselves  in  the  highest  hills  of  the  area  covered  by  Bois  Chas- 
sogne,  Bois  des  Tailles  Forgettes,  Bois  de  Fontaines  and  Bois  de 
Sivry.  The  highest  point  in  the  sector  was  Cote  388,  east  of  Bois  de 
Fontaines  and  fully  eight  kilometers  east  of  the  Meuse.  That  lofty 
hill  was  just  inside  the  Division  line,  now  described  as  rimning  from 
Vilosnes  (exclusive)  northeast  to  Jametz.  From  the  siunmit  of  Cote 
388  there  was  observation  northeast  down  two  kilometers  into  a  deep- 
notched  recess  in  the  cliffs  where  lay  the  village  of  Brandeville;  the 
view  northwest  into  another  deep-cut  valley  in  the  face  of  the  bluffs 
toward  Murvaux  was  shut  off  by  woods.  That  irregularly  triangular 
tableland,  formed  by  the  Brandeville  valley  and  the  Murvaux  valley 
cutting  into  the  jjlateau,  was  covered  by  the  dense  Bois  du  Corrol 
on  the  west  and  Bois  de  Brandeville  on  the  east.  The  northern  part 
of  the  triangle  was  the  rocky  eminence  named  La  Sentinelle,  whence 
one  looked  almost  straight  down  a  hundred  and  fifty  meters  and  far 
to  the  north  over  the  vast  stretches  of  the  Foret  de  Woevre. 

Back  on  the  Meuse,  again,  and  south  of  Liny,  Hill  2"28  and 
Cote  2.52,  whose  southern  and  eastern  slojies  were  covered  by  Bois 
de  Chatillon,  gave  way  eastward  to  higher  liills,  notably  Hill  283 
and  Cote  284.  These  ridges  were  clad  with  the  woods  of  Sartelle, 
which  blended  into  Bois  de  Sivry,  still  further  east.  A  kilometer  up 
the  east  bank  of  the  Meuse  beyond  Bois  de  Chatillon  was  Vilosnes, 
in  French  territory. 

From  the  woods  on  the  eastern  faces  of  that  fii-st  row  of  heiglits 
our  forces  advanced  on  the  morning  of  November  0th  to  drive  the 
enemy  from  the  still  higher  ridges,  where  his  artillery  yet  lingered 
and  dropped  desultory  shells  on  our  troojjs  west  of  the  river,  our 
bridges  and  our  newly  won  hills.  Colonel  Peck,  with  the  vigor  and 
bravery  that  had  characterized  his  every  movement,  was  first  in  action. 
At  8  A.  M.J  with  Captain  Harris'  battalion,  he  was  pushing  eastward 
from  Bois  de  Dun  and,  speeding  along  the  edge  of  the  heights  south 
of  the  Murvaux  valley,  was  soon  conquering  Bois  du  Fayel.  IL's 
troops  went  through  Murvaux  and  formed  east  of  the  village  to  attack 
Bois  du  Corrol.  Lieutenant  Colonel  West,  Avith  the  second  and  third 
battalions,  made  short  work  of  Bois  de  Bussy.  The  second  battalion 
took  Fontaines  in  its  protecting  valley  before  10  o'clock;  clinging 
machine-gun  resistance  Avas  overcome  by  Companies  A  and  C  of  the 
Fifteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion;  and  the  Eleventh  Infantry 
climbed  eastward  to  overrun  Les  Fonzy  Bois,  Bois  Chassogne  and 
Bois  de  Fontaines.  Thus  was  that  regiment  cutting  a  clean  swath 
across  the  jungled  ridges  thi-ee  kilometers  wide  and  straight  toward 
the  highest  crests.     By  night  Colonel  Peck  was  gaining  a  foothold 


car 


zn    iS, 


2    c 


t^ 


<  ' 


1*   tj 


>-     o 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  231 

in  Bois  du  Corrol  and  his  other  two  hattahons  were  well  through  Bois 
de  Fontaines.  A  hundred  prisoners,  three  6-ineh  gims,  six  77 's,  and 
over  a  hundred  machine  guns  were  the  spoils  of  the  day's  fighting. 

South  of  the  Eleventh  the  Sixth,  whose  second  and  third  bat- 
talions had  fought  so  hard  in  the  river  crossing,  had  put  its  first  bat- 
talion into  the  fight.  Cajitain  Keiser,  with  the  Liny-A"ilosnes  road 
as  a  starting  line,  was  conquering  Bois  de  TEpinois  and  Bois  de 
Sartelle,  silencing  the  persistent  machine  guns  with  marching  fire. 
Six  pieces  of  artillery  and  a  score  of  machine  guns  were  trophies 
when  the  battalion  brought  up  on  Cote  28-i  at  noon. 

From  Bois  de  Chatillon  Lieutenant  Hartman  sent  Lieutenant 
Gordon  Stapleton  with  a  patrol  of  eighteen  men  of  Company  M, 
which  had  just  joined  the  battalion  from  its  old  position  west  of  the 
river,  against  Vilosnes  where  the  French  were  still  vainly  endeavor- 
ing to  cross  the  Meuse.  Four  Germans  were  killed  and  four  cap- 
tured as  the  patrol  entered  the  town.  In  a  trench  on  the  river  bank, 
the  patrol  discovered  a  hundred  Boche  defending  the  crossing, 
firing  on  a  small  party  of  French  who  were  struggling  to  cross  the 
river.  Lieutenant  Stapleton's  men  surprised  the  enemy,  attacking 
them  from  the  rear.  With  their  steady  fire  the  patrol  killed  thirty- 
five  and  threw  consternation  into  the  defense.  Eight  Frenchmen  suc- 
ceeded in  crossing  the  canal  and  the  little  party  of  eighteen  Americans 
(one  man  had  been  killed)  and  eight  Frenchmen  took  the  remaining 
sixty-five  Germans  prisoner.  Thus  Vilosnes,  outside  our  sector, 
was  taken  by  the  men  of  Company  M  of  the  Sixth.  Our  French 
allies  were  enabled  to  cross  the  Meuse  and  begin  their  task  of  catch- 
ing up  with  our  forces  advancing  five  kilometers  farther  east.  About 
noon,  another  patrol  from  Company  K  was  sent  out  to  effect  liaison 
with  the  French,  who  were  just  crossing  the  river.  In  the  northern 
outskirts  of  Vilosnes  the  patrol  took  four  more  prisoners. 

The  128th  Infantry,  which  had  passed  through  Captain  Reiser's 
lines  on  Hill  284  and  the  northeast  edges  of  Bois  de  Sartelle,  did  not 
make  progi'ess,  having  difficulty  in  finding  the  way  through  the  woods 
and  encountering  resistance  on  the  north.  In  mid-afternoon  General 
Malone  sent  the  Regimental  Commander  forward  to  direct  person- 
ally the  attack  of  his  troops.  By  evening  the  advance  of  the  Eleventh 
Infantry  had  relieved  the  pressure  from  the  north  and  the  128th  was 
able  to  pass  through  Bois  de  Si\'ry.  They  reached  the  neighborhood 
of  Hill  3.58  in  eastern  Bois  de  Fontaines. 

In  the  northern  half  of  the  Division  sector,  Major  Howitt's 
battalion  of  the  Sixtieth  and  Captain  Olmstead's  battalion  of  the 
Sixty-first  advanced  at  8  a.  m.  to  clean  up  Murvaux  and  Lion  and 


?  s 


_   s 


^     O  "5* 


g     ^     ao 

J-    s 

^  U  ^ 
"£   s   o 

cc  'S    . 
^K5l 


From  the  Meuac  to  the  Lohon  233 

the  mountain  Cote  St.  Germain  between.  Major  IIowitt'.s  battalion 
passed  throu<4li  Jiois  de  Bussy  and  up  the  Murvaux  valley,  over 
praetically  the  same  ground  that  the  Kleventh  Infantry  was  trav- 
ersing in  its  advance  from  Bois  de  Dun.  Comjjanj-  D  of  the  Sixtieth 
established  itself  on  the  south  slope  of  Cote  St.  Germain,  north  of 
and  extending  down  to  Mmvaux.  Captain  Olmstead's  men,  who 
advanced  from  ^Nlilly,  had  hard  going  on  Cote  St.  Germain.  The 
Boche  worked  their  heavy  and  light  machine  guns  steadily  and 
directed  their  77's  point  blank  against  our  assaulting  lines.  Our 
own  machine  guns,  however,  returned  a  constant  and  accurate  fire 
to  cover  the  infantry's  progress  and  the  enemy  was  finally  demoral- 
ized and  disorganized.  The  cantle  of  St.  Germain  was  won  and  the 
Germans  were  driven  northeast  along  the  narrowing  ridge.  A  part 
of  Companj'  B  of  the  Sixty-first  lost  its  directions  in  the  fog  and 
reached  the  Camp  des  Romains  at  the  extreme  northern  end  of  the 
bridge  ahead  of  the  enemy,  whose  consternation  was  increased  by  this 
seemingly  encircling  movement.  The  patrol  was  roughly  handled  by 
the  battalion  of  German  infantry,  which  withdrew  on  finding  Amer- 
icans in  their  rear.  Thirteen  of  our  men  were  taken  prisoners.  Com- 
pany A  of  the  Sixty-first  had  advanced  in  the  valley  bottom  against 
Lion-devant-Dun  and  in  hard  fighting  drove  the  enemy  from  a 
patch  of  w^oods  west  of  the  town.  Its  only  officer.  Lieutenant  Hobert 
Corbey,  received  several  wounds  which  caused  his  death. 

The  enemy  were  driven  out  of  the  town  and  h\  10  o'clock  Com- 
pany A  was  in  possession  of  IJon.  In  the  afternoon  the  enemy 
artillery  beyond  Cote  St.  Germain  turned  loose  on  the  village  and 
our  troops  moved  back  to  the  southern  outskirts  to  escape  the  intense 
shelling.  There  they  dug  in  for  the  night.  'J'he  other  three  com- 
panies of  the  battalion  entrenched  across  the  crest  of  St.  Germain, 
connecting  with  the  Sixtieth  on  the  eastern  slopes  and  in  the  hollow 
half  a  kilometer  beyond  Murvaux.  First  Lieutenant  John  W.  Klein 
of  the  Sixtieth  had  lost  his  life  in  advancing  against  an  enemy  ma- 
chine gun. 

The  second  day's  fighting  had  carried  the  front  seven  kilometers 
beyond  the  Meuse  and  made  the  crossings  safe  from  any  enemy  at- 
tempt to  recapture  the  river  heights.  During  the  day  of  the  6th  the 
Engineers  had  constructed  a  1.500-foot  cordiu'oy  road  leading  across 
the  soft  river  flats  at  Dun.  In  the  afternoon  Boche  aviators  made 
repeated  attempts  to  bomb  the  bridge  and  to  machine-gun  the  workers 
on  the  corduroy  road.  Horses  were  killed  by  bombs  within  twenty 
yards  of  the  bridge,  yet  all  attempts  to  stop  the  work  and  traffic 
were  futile.     Company  F,   Seventh  Engineers,  with  two  captured 


5 
*5 


a. 
S 
o 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  .  235 

machine  guns  did  effective  anti-aircraft  work,  bringing  down  an 
enemy  plane  with  the  occupants  dead.  The  first  vehicle  across  the 
bridge  at  Dun  was  the  accompanying  gun  of  the  Tenth  Field  Artil- 
lery, which  pushed  on  ujj  to  support  the  Sixth  Infantry.  The  dar- 
ing artillerymen  had  their  piece  far  up  on  the  Liny  road  when  a  Ilun 
a\'iat()r,  camouflaged  as  an  Allied  plane,  swooped  low  OA'er  the  75 
and  killed  all  its  horses. 

November  6th  was  a  day  of  moving  up  rear  units  to  keep  pace 
with  the  advance.  General  jSIalone  moved  to  Liny  and  General 
Castner  moved  to  Dun.  The  crossing  of  the  artillery  was  begun  and 
by  e\'ening  the  Tenth  was  located  near  Fontaines  and  the  Seventy- 
sixth  near  Milly.  Due  to  the  very  rapid  progress  of  the  infantry 
and  the  roughness  of  the  roads  little  use  could  be  made  of  the  artillerv 
in  the  sweep  across  the  heights.  The  amnumition  haul  was  ten  to 
eighteen  kilometers  and  the  available  transportation  amounted  to 
only  a  seventh  of  what  should  have  been  provided;  yet  excellent  sup- 
port was  given  the  infantry  at  times  when  the  enemy  offered  stub- 
born resistance.  Fire  was  delivered  on  Bois  du  Corrol  and  Chauimis- 
son  when  Colonel  Peck  was  trying  to  jjcnetrate  those  northern 
heights  on  the  afternoon  of  the  6th. 

An  ambulance  of  Ambulance  Company  Thirty  was  the  second 
vehicle  across  the  Dun  bridge  that  morning,  and  the  Medical  Corps 
followed  the  doughboys  closely.  Dressing  and  collecting  stations 
were  established  at  Dun  and  Milly  and  as  in  the  previous  fighting 
hot  food  was  given  thousands  of  soldiers.  An  ambulance  that  ven- 
tiu-ed  too  far  beyond  Fontaines  was  captured  by  the  Germans,  but 
retaken  by  the  128th  Infantry. 

The  observers  of  the  Eighty-eighth  Aero  Squadron  were  active 
and  scouted  the  front  despite  perpetual  fog  and  rain.  Division 
IIead((uarters  Avere  kept  informed  of  the  advance  of  our  troops  by 
the  planes.  Two  aviators  told  a  strange  story,  however,  which 
could  not  be  confirmed.  Their  report  read,  "On  extreme  left  Amer- 
ican batteries  on  road  noi'th  of  INIilly  firing  east.  An  American  auto 
seen  east  of  Ilaraumont  (south  of  Bois  de  Sivry  in  the  sector  of  the 
French)  and  twenty  American  soldiers  north  of  Haraumont.  Troops 
wei'e  lying  along  the  eastern  edge  of  the  bluff  between  Brande- 
ville  and  Breheville  (also  French  territory).  Recognized  as  Amer- 
ican.    They  waved  back  to  us  in  answer  to  our  signals." 

The  task  of  clearing  the  heights  was  continued  on  the  morning 
of  the  7tb.  Xiuht  patrols  of  the  Sixty-first  had  reconnoitered  Lion 
and  disc()\'ered  the  last  Boche  evacuating.  At  6  a.  M.  a  strong  pati-ol 
entered  the  town  and  found  it  empty.    In  order  to  gain  contact  with 


* 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Louon  237 

the  Ninetieth  Division,  still  west  of  the  ]Meuse,  patrols  explored  west- 
ward from  jNlill.y  and  Lion  and  drove  all  the  enemy  out  of  the  flats 
to  a  point  two  kilometers  north  of  Sassey.  Major  Stark's  battalion 
came  up  from  the  support  positions  shortly  after  noon  and,  relieving 
the  first  battalion,  drove  the  clinging  enemy  completely  from  the 
northern  side  of  Cote  St.  Germain  and  Cote  350.  Major  Stark 
charged  at  the  head  of  his  men  and  was  personally  responsible  for 
the  taking  of  thirteen  prisoners.  North  of  Murvaux  the  first  bat- 
talion of  the  Sixtieth  advanced  to  wipe  up  the  valley.  The  Germans 
were  driven  into  the  woods  north  of  the  blufl^s,  and  the  Ninth  Bri- 
gade had  reached  its  portion  of  the  Division  objective. 

Colonel  Peck  led  his  Eleventh  Infantry  against  Bois  du  Corrol 
and  conquered  that  left  wing  of  the  triangular  plateau,  even  placing 
men  on  the  southern  part  of  La  Sentinelle.  The  regiment  then 
plunged  into  Bois  de  Brandeville  and  won  the  southern  half  of  that 
wood  despite  the  opposition  of  a  fresh  Saxon  regiment  that  had  come 
up  to  Brande^'ille  to  stem  the  rush.  The  128th  Infantry,  also  facing 
fresh  troops,  made  slow  progress  on  the  right  in  passing  from  the 
northeastern  edges  of  Bois  de  Fontaines  toward  Hill  370.  So  great 
was  the  resistance  from  the  machine  guns  in  Brandeville  that  further 
advance  was  not  made.  The  Sixth  was  consolidating  its  positions 
in  support  and  reserve. 

The  Tenth  Brigade  completed  its  task  of  conquering  the  heights 
on  November  8th,  and  brought  the  Division  lines  up  to  the  assigned 
objective.  The  Eleventh  Infantry  swept  the  last  enemy  from  the 
heights  and  a  platoon  of  Company  K  entered  Brandeville  at  8:30 
A.  M.  Extensive  stores  of  signal  property,  a  large  munitions  dump 
and  much  railroad  rolling  stock  were  ours.  The  128th  Infantry, 
pushing  north,  sent  a  battalion  into  the  town  after  meeting  heavy 
losses  on  the  edges  of  the  bluffs.  Captain  Reiser's  battalion  of  the 
Sixth  marched  up  past  Bois  de  Fontaines  and  after  effective  help 
from  our  artillery  won  Hills  388  and  378,  the  highest  points  in  the 
sector.  Captain  Reiser's  forces  then  moved  on  and  occupied  the 
eastern  branch  of  Bois  de  Brandeville,  driving  the  last  Hun  from 
the  heights  in  our  sector.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Hodges'  battalion  had 
moved  in  the  morning  from  the  BrieuUes  bridgehead  to  Cote  284, 
vacated  by  the  first  battalion,  but  staj'cd  there  only  an  hour.  About 
noon  the  second  battalion  moved  up  through  Bois  de  Fontaines  and 
took  up  a  position  reaching  from  Hill  388  across  to  Hill  370,  and 
overlooking  Brandeville.  General  Malone  moved  to  Fontaines  and 
the  Division  P.  C.  came  to  Dun. 


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From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  239 

The  heights  of  the  Meuse  were  won.  The  Fifth  Division's 
wedge  in  the  enemy's  territory  east  of  the  river  placed  his  entire  hne 
in  a  critical  situation  and  he  was  forced  to  withdraw  from  the  whole 
rivei-  front  south  of  Vilosnes,  where  the  Seventeenth  French  Corps 
had  been  held  up  through  weeks  of  bitter  fighting.  Crossing  on  our 
bridge  at  Brieulles  a  liattalion  of  French  infantry  of  their  Fifteenth 
Division  jiushed  east  from  Vilosnes  on  the  7th  and  captured  Harau- 
mont,  and  as  the  Fifth's  further  advance  relieved  the  pressure  on  the 
northeast,  the  corps  to  our  riglit  was  al)le  to  carry  the  fighting  north- 
ward east  of  the  ]Meuse. 

II 

The  men  of  the  Red  Diamond  wei-e  weary  and  hungry  and  worn 
by  the  advance  that  had  been  so  rapid  as  to  leave  supplies  far  in  the 
rear,  by  the  rough  country  that  had  confronted  them  every  stej)  of  the 
way  since  the  crossing  of  the  river,  by  the  rain  that  seemed  perpetual 
and  by  the  cold  of  early  winter.  Nevertheless,  the  men  were  ready 
and  eager  for  their  next  mission.  Ahead,  reaching  almost  as  far  as 
eye  could. see  from  those  bluffs  on  which  our  outposts  lay,  stretched 
the  Foret  de  Woevre  with  a  host  of  smaller  woods  on  its  southern 
limits — Habessaux.  Bois  du  Deffoy,  Bois  de  Murvaux,  Bois  de 
Remoiville,  Bois  IVIoncel  and  Bois  de  Jametz.  Seven  kilometers 
northeast  of  Brandeville,  past  Bois  ]Moncel  and  Bois  de  Jametz, 
were  the  three  towns  of  Jametz,  Remoiville  and  Louppy,  closely 
grouped  on  the  Loison  river.  Two  kilometers  down  the  Loison 
north  of  Louppy  laj'  Juvigny,  situated  in  the  hills  beyond  the  Foret 
de  Woevre. 

Strong  patrols  pushed  deep  into  the  enemy's  territory  all  along 
our  front  during  the  night  of  the  8th,  to  discover  whether  or  not  the 
Germans  were  still  holding.  The  patrols  of  the  Sixtieth  and  of  the 
Eleventh  found  the  Boche  still  close  by  in  Habessaux  and  Bois  du 
Deffoy;  but  parties  from  La  Sentinelle  and  Bois  de  Brandeville 
went  past  Bois  de  Murvaux,  three  kilometers  toward  Brandeville, 
without  finding  the  enemy. 

Colonel  Peck  took  charge  of  a  reconnoitering  party  of  the 
Eleventh,  consisting  of  Conn)anies  E  and  G,  to  gain  contact  with  the 
enemy.  Passing  through  Bois  de  Murvaux  unmolested  the  detach- 
ment found  and  drove  out  scattered  remnants  of  the  enemy  from 
Bois  de  Remoiville.  The  signalmen  had  carried  forward  a  telephone 
line  witli  the  scouting  party,  and  Colonel  Peck  was  able  to  report 
his  reconnaissance  to  General  JNIalone  immediately.  The  remainder 
of  the  regiment  was  sent  forward  to  join  the  advance  guard  in  Bois 


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From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  241 

de  Remoiville.  ^^y  6:15  in  the  evening  the  regiment  was  consoHdated 
and  formed  to  attack  the  rear-guards  of  the  withdrawing  enemy. 
The  pursuit  was  pushed  energetically  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  West. 
The  Boche  were  overtaken  in  Bois  de  INIoncel,  and  notwithstanding 
their  spirited  resistance  with  rifle  and  macliine  gun  fire  they  were 
thrown  north  and  northeastward  across  tlie  lioison.  From  the 
heights  beyond  the  stream  the  hostile  artillery  boml)arded  our  vic- 
torious lines,  shelling  the  territory  as  far  back  as  the  Brandeville 
heights.  Lieutenant  Colonel  AVest  and  Captain  Cowart  occupied 
Remoiville  with  the  second  battalion  about  7:35  that  evening,  while 
the  third  battalion  cleaned  up  Bois  Moncel  and  took  possession  of 
railroad  yards  and  engineer  and  ordnance  dimips  worth  probably  a 
million  dollars.  A  patrol  from  Company  G  under  Lieutenant  Wil- 
liam X.  Ross  advanced  on  Louppy  and  took  that  town  with  its  great 
old  chateau.  Thirty-eight  civilians  were  liberated.  Our  men  could 
not  fully  occupy  the  town  because  enemy  machine  guns  on  the  hill 
beyond  the  river  swept  the  northern  portions  of  the  village.  With 
Company  K,  however,  Louppy  was  cleaned  out.  In  approaching 
Jametz,  Captain  Colwin's  first  battalion  had  to  wade  one  stream 
breast-deep  and  then  swim  the  Loison  in  the  face  of  the  hostile  fire. 
Clothes  were  frozen  in  the  cold  night  air,  but  by  9  p.  m.  of  Novem- 
ber 9th  the  town  was  entered  and  eighty-five  civilians  were  set  free. 

The  Sixth  Infantry  followed  the  Eleventh  as  support.  Lieu- 
tenant Colonel  Hodges  had  taken  up  his  duties  as  lieutenant  colonel 
of  the  regiment  and  Captain  Richard  Wightman  led  the  second  bat- 
talion up  the  Brandeville-Remoiville  road  under  heavy  shelling  to 
support  the  Eleventh.  The  forces  reached  Remoiville  about  mid- 
night, with  only  light  casualties  from  the  shell-fire.  The  128tli 
Infantry  had  passed  from  the  control  of  the  Fifth  Division  that  day 
when  the  Thirty-second  Division  relieved  the  Fifteenth  French 
Division  on  the  line  Breheville-Damvillers. 

The  advance  of  the  Tenth  Brigade  was  ended.  The  speed  of  its 
attack  had  carried  the  Division  front  eighteen  kilometers  east  of  the 
Meuse,  the  farthest  eastward  point  reached  by  the  American  Army 
at  the  time  of  the  Armistice.  It  was  necessary  to  wait  until  the 
division  on  our  right  could  come  up  and  until  the  Ninth  Brigade 
could  complete  its  difficult  task  of  conquering  the  Foret  de  Woevre, 
and  bring  its  line  abreast.  Moreover,  the  men  were  tired  from  the 
long  marches  and  hard  fighting  and  needed  a  little  breathing  spell 
and  a  chance  to  pull  themselves  together.  Consequently,  General 
Ely  confirmed  General  Malone's  order  that  no  further  advance  be 
made  until  notified,  that  positions  gained  be  consolidated  and  that 


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5 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  243 

preparations  for  a  renewal  of  the  attack  eastward  toward  Longuyon 
be  fully  made  in  antieijjation  of  subsequent  orders. 

Companies  L  and  31  of  the  Sixty-first,  with  four  machine  guns 
of  Company  B  of  the  Fom-teenth,  imder  command  of  Captain 
Chester  E.  INIartin,  had  left  Lion  at  daybreak  of  the  9th  to  seek  out 
the  enemy  in  the  direction  of  INIouzay.  jNIachine  gun  fire  was  en- 
countered in  Bois  de  Lion,  a  couple  of  kilometers  north  of  town. 
Nine  Germans  were  killed  and  one  made  prisoner  and  the  party 
proceeded  northward,  overcoming  machine  guns  on  the  way  and 
passing  through  artillery  fire. 

The  Boche  had  expected  the  Americans  to  attempt  to  cross  the 
Meuse  in  the  lowlands  north  of  Sassey  and  had  built  their  strongest 
defense  system  along  and  facing  the  river  between  Dun  and  INIouzay, 
where  the  Ninetieth  Division  was  still  west  of  the  river.  Thus  when 
Captain  Martin  advanced  up  the  Lion-Mouzay  road  he  was  striking 
the  Germans  in  rear  of  their  heavily  wired  front  and  was  driving 
them  northward  parallel  to  and  behind  their  lines  of  defense.  The 
enemy  was  taken  utterly  unawares.  As  a  German  prisoner  under 
examination  said.  "The  Americans  are  such  fools  we  never  know 
where  they  are  going  to  advance  next."  Some  machine  gunners 
picked  their  weapons  up  and  turned  them  to  the  south  wlien  they 
discovered  the  Sixty-first  advancing  on  them,  but  the  majority  re- 
tired toward  Chateau  Charmois  and  Mouzay. 

Chateau  Charmois  was  taken  after  the  lingering  enemy  had  been 
routed.  Those  machine  gunners  who  resisted  made  their  last  stand, 
for  our  men  were  not  in  a  mood  to  stand  trifling.  Then  the  com- 
panies continued  the  advance  outside  our  sector  and  attacked  Mou- 
zay. After  a  brisk  encounter  a  whole  enemy  battalion  was  driven 
out.  By  1 :45  p.  m.  the  two  companies  were  in  possession  of  the 
town.  Thus  was  the  east  bank  of  the  Meuse  cleared  of  the  enemy 
eleven  kilometers  north  of  tlie  crossing  of  Clery-le-Petit.  Outpost 
lines  were  established  five  hundred  meters  north  and  east  of  the  vil- 
lage and  a  bridgehead  for  the  crossing  of  the  Ninetieth  Division  was 
secured.  Companies  I  and  K  were  sent  up  to  Mouzay  immediately 
with  food  for  the  seven  hundred  French  civilians  who  were  liberated 
by  this  action  of  ours  outside  our  sector. 

The  remainder  of  the  Sixty-first  marched  up  to  Chateau  Char- 
mois. Captain  Olmstead's  battalion  turned  east  to  penetrate  the 
Foret  de  Woevre  in  the  direction  of  Juvigny  and  Louppy.  For 
three  kilometers  the  march  proceeded  throughout  tlie  wet  w^oods, 
interrupted  only  by  frequent  shelling  of  the  roads.  Search  for 
traversable  routes  was  difficult  in  the  darkness  and  the  forest  proved 


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From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  245 

to  be  a  jungle  of  thick  trees,  heavy  iiiulerbriish  and  swamps  with  all 
trails  knee-deep  in  mud.  On  approaching  the  hills  probably  a 
quarter  of  the  way  to  Juvigny  the  battalion  struck  the  enemy,  meet- 
ing with  heavy  machine  gun  resistance.  The  forces  halted  and  waited 
for  daylight  to  continue  the  advance  against  the  Boche,  who  evinced 
a  wide-awake  and  spirited  resistance.  Every  noise  from  our  troops 
called  fire  from  the  German  machine  guns.  The  wireless  detach- 
ment of  the  Ninth  Field  Signal  Battalion,  which  had  accompanied 
the  leading  battalion  to  keep  brigade  headquarters  informed  of  the 
progress  made,  had  six  members  of  its  platoon  killed  and  its  ap- 
paratus riddled  with  bullets  when  it  attempted  to  send  messages  back 
that  night. 

At  daybreak  of  the  10th  the  first  and  second  battalions  of  the 
Sixty-first  resumed  their  attempts  to  get  through  Foret  de  Woevre. 
The  Boche  were  strongly  located  in  Bois  de  Chenois  in  the  Nine- 
tieth's sector  east  of  Mouzay,  and  every  attempt  of  Captain  Olm- 
stead's  battalion  to  climb  the  heights  subjected  them  to  enfilading 
fire.  Finally  the  battalion  was  deploj^ed  facing  north,  in  a  line  run- 
ning east  and  west,  three  to  four  kilometers  from  Mouzay.  With 
this  protection  Major  Stark's  battalion  was  able  to  push  on  over  the 
eastern  hills  two  kilometers  farther,  undergoing  heavy  shelling  and 
machine  gun  fire  from  the  northern  heights,  where  the  enemy  was 
making  a  determined  stand  along  the  Baalon-Louppj'  road.  About 
noon  the  third  battalion  moved  up  from  Mouzay,  having  protected 
the  crossing  of  the  Ninetieth  and  turned  the  town  over  to  that  divi- 
sion. By  night  the  Sixty-first  was  in  liaison  with  the  Ninetieth  in 
Bois  de  Chenois  and  the  Sixtieth  in  the  eastern  edge  of  Foret  de 
Woevre. 

The  Sixtieth  had  sent  patrols  into  southern  Foret  de  Woevre 
on  the  night  of  the  9th.  About  1  a.  m.  of  the  10th  the  first  and  third 
battalions  moved  forward  along  the  very  muddy  forest  road  from 
Cote  St.  Germain  toward  Juvigny.  The  Boche  seemed  to  have 
deserted  the  region,  although  his  artillery  jjlayed  on  the  roads  and 
impeded  progress.  At  6  o'clock  the  first  battalion  had  advanced 
past  Ferme  de  St.  Dagobert,  about  half  way  across  the  wood.  The 
march  continued  and  the  rear  guards  of  the  enemy  were  overtaken 
in  the  eastern  portions  of  the  woods,  south  of  Bois  de  Juvigny,  more 
than  six  kilometers  from  Cote  St.  Germain.  The  second  battalion, 
which  had  been  stationed  in  Bois  de  Bussy  and  Bois  de  Chenois  as 
Division  reserve,  moved  to  Cote  St.  Germain,  and  in  the  afternoon 
joined  the  regiment.     Then  the  Sixtieth  attacked  the  Germans,  driv- 


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From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  247 

ing  them,  after  considerable  fighting,  from  the  Foret.     Patrols  went 
southeast  to  Louppy  and  gained  contact  with  the  Eleventh  Infantry. 

In  the  Tentli  Brigade  sector  no  forward  movement  beyond  the 
line  Jametz,  Remoiville,  Louj^py  was  made  on  the  10th,  as  heretofore 
stated.  The  ground  nortli  of  the  Loison  was  hilly  and  reconnaissance 
patrols  from  the  Eleventh  and  Sixth  found  the  German  machine 
guns  and  snipers  well  fortified  there.  Any  advance  necessitated 
crossing  the  open  ground  between  river  and  hills  under  the  cross- 
fire of  the  enemy.  Success  would  be  possible  only  with  concerted 
action  on  right  and  left  Hanks,  so  the  forces  waited  until  neighbor- 
ing units  could  come  up. 

After  reaching  Remoiville  at  midnight  of  the  9th  the  second 
battalion  of  the  Sixth  had  pushed  southeast  up  the  road  to  Jametz. 
The  whole  march  was  exposed  to  the  fire  of  the  enemj'  and  Company 
H,  leading,  spent  the  night  cleaning  out  machine  gun  nests.  On 
the  morning  of  the  10th  Captain  AViglitman  moved  into  Jametz  and 
began  the  organization  of  the  point  of  the  right  flank  of  the  Division. 
Comjiany  G  held  the  north  of  the  town;  Company  H  was  on  the 
east;  Company  F  was  south;  Companj'  E  formed  the  support. 
Major  Leonard,  who  had  recovered  from  his  bullet  wound  received 
west  of  Bois  des  Kappes,  was  back  in  command  of  the  third  battalion 
in  Bois  Moncel.  Captain  Keiser  had  the  first  battalion  in  Bois  de 
Jametz,  protecting  the  right  flank.  The  Thirtj^-second  Division  five 
kilometers  in  the  rear  was  slowly  fighting  its  way  up  past  Breheville. 

The  whole  area  through  which  the  Fiftli  Division  was  moving- 
forward  to  solidify  its  positions  after  the  swift  advance  of  the  9th 
of  November  was  heavil}-  shelled  by  the  German  artillery.  Division 
Headquarters  moved  to  IVIurvaux,  Xinth  Brigade  to  Lion-devant- 
Dun  and  Tenth  Brigade  to  Brandeville.  The  Thirteenth  INIachine 
Gun  Battalion  reached  Bois  de  Remoiville  as  part  of  the  Division 
reserve  just  in  time  to  run  into  a  bombardment  which  continued 
steadily  throughout  the  last  twenty-four  hours  of  the  war.  Captain 
Harry  Frazer,  Q.  M.  C. ;  Captain  George  F.  Dashiell  of  the 
Eleventh  and  Second  Lieutenants  Chester  W.  Buchanan  and  Willie 
Grigsby  of  the  Sixth  were  killed  by  enemy  shrapnel.  During  that 
last  day  the  Sixth  Infantry  suffered  142  casualties  from  shelling. 

Wlien  General  Malone  moved  to  Brandeville  Lieutenant 
Colonel  Hodges  went  forward  to  establish  an  advance  P.  C.  for  the 
Sixth.  A  spot  was  selected  next  tlie  railroad  bank  southeast  of  Bois 
Moncel  and  Lieutenant  Colonel  Hodges  took  up  his  station  there 
with  Lieutenant  Hayes,  the  artillery  liaison  officer,  and  his  runners. 
The  Boche  artillery  had  the  spot  under  observation  and  evidently 


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O 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  249 

well  located,  for  shells  drojjped  all  around,  now  over,  now  short. 
The  fire  came  from  north  of  Renioiville  and  was  nearly  parallel  to 
the  railroad.  Bursts  just  across  the  tracks  threw  mud  over  the  spot 
called  a  P.  C.  and  machine  gunners  beyond  Jametz  added  to  the 
warmth  by  sending  over  an  occasional  vollej\  A  man  whose  curi- 
osity was  not  to  be  satisfied  j^eeped  over  the  embankment  to  see  what 
he  could  see.  A  bullet  struck  his  helmet  and  sent  him  spinning  to 
the  ground.  He  got  up  ruefully  rubbing  his  head  and  feeling  to  see 
whether  it  was  still  there,  but  perfectly  content  to  sit  thereafter  in 
the  shelter  of  the  till. 

The  shells  continued  to  "fall  with  regularity  and  precision,  and 
tinally  the  artilleryman's  arguments  convinced  the  colonel  that  only 
a  slight  variation  in  deflection,  easily  within  the  probable  error  of  the 
German  battery,  might  wijje  out  the  P.  C.  and  the  whole  party. 
The  P.  C.  was  moved  just  in  time  to  the  south  edge  of  the  wood;  a 
few  minutes  later  a  shell  burst  in  the  vacated  spot.  But  even  the  new 
location  was  not  safe.  Colonel  Hunt  and  his  headcjuarters  moved 
up.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Hodges  had  just  gone  forward  to  estab- 
lish another  advance  P.  C.  in  Jametz  when  a  shell  struck  near  the 
regimental  party  and  killed  Captain  SaniucI  M.  Sowerbutts,  the 
adjutant. 

Oil  account  of  the  impassable  condition  of  the  roads  through  the 
Foret  de  Woevre,  General  Castner  sent  his  trains  around  the  south 
borders  of  the  woods,  over  tlie  I>ion-Louppy  road,  to  meet  the  fight- 
ing men  after  they  completed  their  conquest  of  the  forest  and  to  re- 
vive them  with  good,  hot  food.  The  trains  ran  into  the  heavy  and 
accurate  shelling  that  the  Boche  were  laying  on  the  roads  all  day  of 
the  10th,  and  six  men  wei-e  killed.  ]Many  animals  were  lost  and  the 
trains  had  to  remain  halted  until  darkness  came.  Enemy  aviators 
were  directing  their  fire,  circling  low  over  the  routes.  A  wagoner  of 
the  Sixtieth  reached  for  his  rifle  and  took  a  shot  at  one  of  the  planes. 
Evidently  the  shot  disturl)ed  the  composure  of  the  flyer,  for  he  dived 
down  on  the  oft'ending  wagoner  and  riddled  him  with  machine  gun 
fire  as  the  plane  sped  past. 

Company  E  of  the  Seventh  Engineers,  under  Lieutenant  Men- 
denliall,  constructed  on  the  night  of  the  10th  a  wagon  bridge  across 
the  Loison  ri\'er  at  Louppy.  Stringers,  flooring  and  braces  were 
lashed  into  place  across  the  fifty-foot  stream  in  the  darkness — lashed, 
because  the  slightest  sounds  of  hammering  brought  heavy  bursts  of 
fire  from  the  enemy  machine  guns  and  snipers  across  the  valley  not 
four  hundred  meters  away.  Another  bridge  was  built  at  Jametz  by 
platoons  of  Company  C  of  the  same  regiment  under  Master  Engi- 


O 


ft 

o 

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Si 


a. 


"-si 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  251 

neers  Tobin  and  Sheerin.  Lieutenant  K.  C.  ]\Iillspaugli,  originally 
in  command  of  the  platoons,  was  killed  by  shell-fire  at  2  a.  ji.  on  the 
nth.  During  the  advance  from  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  the  Engi- 
neers had  been  busily  engaged  in  opening  up  roads,  the  second 
battalion  of  the  Seventh  operating  in  the  sector  of  the  Ninth  Brigade 
and  the  first  battalion  in  the  sector  of  the  Tenth  Brigade.  Morning 
of  the  11th  found  Comijany  D  in  I>ouppy,  Company  C  at  Jametz. 
Companies  A,  E  and  F  between  Louppy  and  Brandeville,  and  Com- 
pany B  at  Brandeville  putting  the  light  railway  material  at  that  place 
in  shape  for  forwarding  supplies.  Kegimental  Ileachpiarters  spent 
the  last  twenty-fom-  hours  of  the  war  in  Brandeville  and  it  was  here 
on  the  afternoon  of  the  10th  that  a  direct  hit  on  the  headquarters 
baggage  wagon  placed  l)attle  scars  on  the  Regimental  Standards. 

For  November  11th  it  was  i)lanned  to  push  on  toward  JNIontmedy 
and  Longuyon.  In  the  early  hours  of  the  morning  the  Sixtieth  In- 
fantry, with  Company  M  in  the  van  and  opposing  some  of  the 
enemy's  best  troops,  drove  the  last  Boche  from  out  Bois  de  Juvigny. 
The  Sixty-first  l)rought  its  lines  up  to  the  northern  edges  of  the 
Foret  de  Woevre,  still  protecting  its  left  flank  back  to  Bois  de 
Chenois,  where  liaison  joined  the  Fifth  and  Ninetieth. 

A  heavy  fog  lay  over  the  valley  of  the  I>oison  and  prevented  the 
Tenth  Brigade  from  beginning  their  attack  against  the  strongly  held 
hills  ahead  of  them.  A^^len  at  0  o'clock  the  sun  dispersed  the  fog, 
infantrymen  and  machine  gunners  of  the  Eleventh  Infantry  were 
crawling  forward  toward  the  Boche  machine-gun  nests  prcAiously 
located.  Colonel  Peck  had  carefully  prepared  his  attack.  A  unit  of 
the  Chemical  Warfare  Service  was  in  position  ready  to  assist  at  the 
given  signal.  But  the  fog  lifted  and  the  Germans  discovered  all 
these  preparations. 

Consternation  reigned  in  the  enemy's  ranks.  Immediately  a 
white  flag  was  waved  and  a  man  came  forward  from  the  opposing 
lines.  He  was  an  officer  and  he  s[)oke  good  English.  T^i)on  lieing 
conducted  to  Colonel  Peck  he  exclaimed.  "My  God,  Sir,  what  are  you 
doing?    Don't  you  know  the  Ai-mistice  goes  into  effect  at  11  o'clock?" 

"No;  is  that  so!"  replied  Colonel  Peck.  "Then  that  sjjoils  all  my 
schemes!"  And  just  at  that  moment  came  the  radio  message  from 
General  INIalone.  "Armistice  at  11  o'clock.    All  flghting  called  off." 

Thus  when  hostilities  ended  the  Ninth  Brigade  was  ready  to 
storm  Juvigny  and  the  Tenth  Brigade  was  feeling  out  the  enemy 
bey(Mid  the  I^iison.  The  troops  halted  and  remained  on  their  lines 
of  farthest  advance.  The  men  of  the  Red  Diamond  were  holding  an 
extended  front  of  thirteen  kilometers — past  Jametz,  Remoiville  and 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  253 

Louppy  and  along  the  furtlier  edges  of  the  Foret  de  Woevre — 
eighteen  kilometers  from  the  original  crossings  of  the  Meuse  at 
Brieiilles  and  Clery-le-Petit,  five  kilometers  in  advance  of  the  division 
on  the  left  and  two  kilometers  beyond  the  division  on  the  right. 

Ill 

The  glorious  achievement  of  the  Fifth  Division  can  best  be 
recorded  in  the  words  that  INIajor  General  Ely  addressed  to  his  vic- 
torious soldiers  in  General  Orders  on  the  day  the  Armistice  ended 
hostilities : 

"It  is  with  pride  and  pleasure  that  the  Division  Commander 
calls  the  attention  of  the  Division  to  General  Orders  No.  41,  Third 
Corps,  of  November  9th,  1918,  wherein  the  Corps  Commander  cites 
the  Fifth  Division  for  'Forcing,  against  the  enemy  in  position,  a 
crossing  of  the  River  ^Nleuse  near  Dun  and  near  BrieuUes,  ])uilding 
bridges  and  swimming  the  river  in  the  face  of  machine  gun  and 
artillery  fire  and  in  advancing  some  nine  kilometers  in  the  enemy's 
territory  to  the  vicinity  of  Brandeville.  This  action  not  only  uncov- 
ered the  left  flank  of  the  Seventeenth  French  Corps  and  enabled  that 
Corps  to  advance,  but  broke  the  line  of  resistance  of  the  German 
Army,  and,  by  turning  its  position  on  the  east  bank  of  the  Meuse, 
compelled  its  withdrawal;  and  a  letter  of  November  11,  1918,  from 
the  Chief  of  Staff.  First  Army,  A.  E.  F.,  to  the  Commanding  Gen- 
eral, Third  Corps.  A.  E.  F.,  wherein  he  states;  'The  Army  Com- 
mander has  noticed  with  great  pleasure  and  appreciation  the  excellent 
work  of  your  Corps  in  crossing  the  Meuse  River  and  clearing  the 
heights  to  the  east  of  the  to^Mi  of  Dun-sur-Meuse.  He  appreciates 
fully  the  difficulties  involved  in  this  problem  and  therefore,  realizes 
that  the  results  attained  reflect  great  credit  on  your  Corps  and  the 
divisions  included  therein.' 

"The  Fifth  Division  alone  forced  tlie  crossing  and  establislied  the 
bridgehead.  It  was  afterwards  joined  for  a  few  days  by  a  regiment 
of  the  Thirty-second  Division.  For  two  days  and  nights  the  Division 
held  a  front  of  twenty  kilometers  against  the  enemy  on  its  front  and 
both  flanks.  Not  content  with  this,  it  went  out  of  its  sector  on  the 
north  and  took  the  toTvai  of  Mouzay  and  turned  it  over  to  the  Ninetieth 
Division.  On  the  south,  it  went  out  of  its  sector  and  took  Vilosnes, 
enabling  the  French  Division  on  its  right  to  cross  the  river. 

"In  the  thirty  days  preceding  the  Armistice,  this  Division  was 
seriously  engaged  imder  shell,  rifle  and  machine  gun  fire  twenty- 
seven  days.     In  tlie  past  two  weeks,  no  day  has  passed  that  some 


IBP       '■■;^t^  ' 


^^&7^us'e  zA^^Juie 


From  the  Meusc  to  the  Loison  255 

town,  wood,  or  hill  has  not  been  wrested  from  the  enemy.  In  suc- 
cession, the  following  were  captured:  Bois  des  Rappes,  Aincreville, 
Bois  de  Babiemont,  Clery-le-Grand,  Clery-le-Petit,  Brieulles,  Doul- 
eon,  Dun-sur-Meuse,  Liny,  range  of  hills  east  of  the  Meuse  forming 
the  bridgehead,  Vilosnes,  INIilly,  Lion,  Murvaux,  Fontaines,  Chateau 
Charmois,  iNIouzay,  Brandeville,  Foret  de  Woevre,  Jametz,  Remoi- 
ville,  Loupjjy.  A  penetration  of  twenty  kilometers  into  the  enemy's 
line  was  made,  wresting  from  him  one  hundred  and  ninety  square 
kilometers  of  territory,  and  on  announcement  of  the  Armistice  the 
Division  had  a  front  of  thirteen  kilometers,  being  five  kilometers  in 
advance  of  troops  on  its  left  and  two  kilometers  beyond  troops  on  its 
right. 

"Thirty-seven  cannon,  four  hundred  and  sixty-one  machine 
guns,  and  over  nine  hundred  prisoners  were  captured.  However, 
what  the  Division  Commander  wishes  most  to  congratulate  the  Divi- 
sion upon  is  its  untiring,  uncomplaining  tenacity  of  jjurpose  in  its 
constant  driving  at  the  enemy  in  spite  of  fatigue  and  shortage  of 
rations,  being  wet  from  swimming  the  river  and  canal,  or  wading  the 
swamp  of  the  Foret  de  Woevre.  This  is  a  brilliant  example  of  ^vhat 
the  American  soldier  can  do  in  an  emergency  when  he  must  go  on 
to  the  utmost  extent  of  his  power.  The  Division  Commander  is  proud 
of  the  work  of  the  Division.  jVo  division  could  have  accomjjlished 
more,  and  every  member  of  the  command  should  be  proud  to  belong- 
to  a  division  which  has  so  brilliantly  ended  its  record  in  the  greatest 
war  the  world  has  known." 

In  General  Orders  General  Ely  cited  each  of  his  brigades  that 
had  contributed  so  much  to  the  success  of  the  American  Army  and 
the  Allied  cause: 

"It  is  with  pride  and  pleasure  that  the  Division  Commander 
desires  to  make  of  record  the  gallant  conduct  of  the  Tenth  Brigade, 
Brigadier  General  Paul  B.  ]\Ialone,  commanding,  together  with  the 
uncomplaining  tenacity  of  purpose  shown  in  the  recent  operations  of 
this  brigade  in  the  difficult  crossing  of  the  Meuse  under  heavy  artil- 
lery and  machine  gun  fire  and  the  subsequent  capture  of  Hills  200 
and  228,  Liny,  the  Bois  de  Chatillon,  Murvaux,  Fontaines,  Vilosnes, 
Brandeville,  Jametz,  Remoiville  and  Louppy. 

"In  these  operations  under  the  stress  of  severe  weather  condi- 
tions and  confronted  with  difficult  natural  obstacles  tenaciously  de- 
fended, the  brigade  forged  on  day  by  day  capturing  men,  cannon 
and  machine  guns  until  the  Armistice  put  an  end  to  its  progress. 

"The  Division  Conmiander  is  25i'oud  to  have  in  his  command  a 


256  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

brigade  so  gallantly  and  ably  led  and  so  forceful  and  dashing  in 
attack." 

The  Ninth  Brigade  citation  was: 

"It  is  with  pride  and  jjleasure  that  the  Division  Conmiander 
desires  to  make  of  record  the  gallant  conduct  of  the  Ninth  Brigade, 
Brigadier  General  J.  C.  Castner,  commanding,  in  crossing  the  Meuse 
and  capturing  the  important  positions  and  strongholds  of  Dun-sur- 
Meuse,  Milly,  Lion-devant-Dun.  Chamois  Chateau,  Mouzay,  Cote 
St.  Germain,  and  the  Foret  de  Woevre. 

"A  spirit  of  fearlessness,  coupled  with  tactical  leadership,  was 
displayed  that  will  ever  be  a  shining  mark  in  the  annals  of  the  Fifth 
Division. 

"For  many  days  the  brigade  battled  against  an  enemy  who  en- 
deavored tenaciously  to  hold  positions,  the  terrain  of  which  afforded 
every  advantage  of  defense.  Undaunted  by  difficulties  of  attack,  the 
brigade  pushed  on  under  the  withering  fire  of  machine  guns  and 
artillery.  The  fortitude  and  gallantry  displayed  by  the  entire  bri- 
gade reflects  the  greatest  credit  u])on  it  and  the  division." 

Those  sixteen  last  days  of  fighting  had  been  less  bloody  than  the 
eleven  days  of  bitter  struggling  in  and  around  Bois  des  Rappes;  the 
Red  Diamond  was  driving  a  beaten  enemy  from  out  one  strongly 
fortified  position  to  another,  and  gains  in  groimd,  prisoners  and  ma- 
terial were  great.  The  Fifth  Dixision's  casualties  for  the  last  two 
weeks  were  4.57  killed,  1,520  wounded,  127  missing  and  26  captured. 
Ten  Cxcrman  officers  and  622  men  had  been  taken,  while  the  revised 
list  of  captured  material  included  nine  ])ieces  of  heavy  artillery, 
thirty-five  pieces  of  light  artillery,  forty-four  trench  mortars,  677 
machine  guns  and  1,135  rifles.  After  the  Ninth  Brigade  had  ad- 
vanced five  and  a  half  kilometers  in  clearing  the  territoiy  west  of  the 
river  the  two  brigades  abreast  drove  the  Ilun  east  of  the  Meuse  an- 
other eighteen  kilometers,  making  a  total  sweep  of  twenty-three  and 
a  half  kilometers  and  covering  an  extent  of  nearly  two  hundred 
squaT-e  kilometers.  One  officer  had  won  the  Medal  of  Honor  and 
nineteen  officers  and  fifty-one  enlisted  men  had  won  the  Distinguished 
Service  Cross  for  their  gallantry  in  action.  Eight  officers  and  over 
a  hundred  and  fifty  men  were  cited  in  Division  General  Orders. 

Since  the  first  introduction  into  the  trenches  in  June  the  Divi- 
sion as  a  whole  had  been  in  the  line  a  hundred  and  three  days  of  the 
hundred  and  fifty.  Total  casualties  amounted  to  approximately 
10,000.  Eighty-fom-  officers  and  1,691  enlisted  men  were  killed,  and 
died  of  wounds,  310  officers  and  6,982  enlisted  men  wounded,  2  of- 
ficers and  254  men  missing  and  60  men  captured.     Total  prisoners 


i 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  257 

taken  in  all  operations  were  2,368,  including  51  officers,  2,316  men 
and  1  woman.  The  Division's  total  advance  amounted  to  thirty-five 
kilometers,  covering  an  area  of  two  lumdred  and  twenty  square  kilo- 
meters. German  material  captured  included  25  pieces  of  heavy 
and  72  pieces  of  light  artillery,  74  trench  mortars,  802  machine  guns, 
1,68.5  rifles,  and  vast  quantities  of  ammunition  and  war  stores  of 
every  sort. 


258  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ENLISTED  MEN  KILLED   IN  ACTION 
SECOND  PHASE  MEUSE-ARGONNE  OPERATIONS 


SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 


Bn.  S^'t.  Maj.  James  A.  Bradley,  Hq.  Co. 

I'vt.  Floyd  Brown,  Hq.  Co. 

Mech.  Bernard  F.  Canniff,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Roy  Silbough,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Benjamin  Boyce,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Cari  W.  Neff,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pfc.  James  W.  Arrowood,  Sup.  Co. 

I.st  Sgt.  Edward  P.  Beck,  Sup.  Co. 

Pvt.  Jeremiah  Walls,  Su)i.  Co. 

Pfc.  Fred  I.ingenfelser,  Med.  Det. 
*Pvt.  Walter  August,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  John  Bascom,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  Earl  S.  Parkinson,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  John  M.  Porinski,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Phillip  S.  Carlton,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Devers,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.   Bernard  L.  Armstrong,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Rudy  Canup,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Hermane  Carter,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Anthony  Chuher,  Co.  D. 
*Pvt.  Winslow  Dickson,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  John  Frasco,  Co.  D. 

Pfc.  John  Mathews,  Co.  D. 
*Pvt.  Joseph  P.  O'Birne,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Donald  Wilkerson,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  James  W.  Jenkins,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Adolph  T.  Nagel,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  George  P.  O'Driscoll,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Clarence  Voss,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Robert  F.  Warren,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Oscar  Alamrode,  Co.  F. 


Pvt.  George  Bloch,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Morris  L.  Metliz,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Patrick   O'Connell,  Co.   F. 

Pvt.  Clarence  Hawartli,  Co.  G. 

Sgt.  Tioti   Jankowski,   Co.    G. 

Sgt.  Emil  F.  Niedman,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Raymond   Rockwell,  Co.   G. 

Pvt.  Orville  N.  Stover,  Co.  G. 
*Corp.  Harry  W.  Anderson,  Co.  H. 

Mech.   Frederick   Benzing,  Co.   H. 

Pvt.  Zigmont  Chcresko,  Co.  H. 

Corp.  John   B.   Klebe,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Charley  C.  Moss,  Co.  H. 
*Pvt.  William  F.  Sliea,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Frank  P.  Costello,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Arthur  Daminas,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  John  Fift,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Harry  R.  Henz,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Samuel  Schwartz,  Co.   I. 

Corjj.  William  Trapp,  Co.  I. 
*Pvt.  James  Callahan,  Co.  L. 
*Pvt.  Robert  Hunter,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Elmer  J.  McCann,  Co.  I>. 

Pvt.  Joe  Aneen,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Doty,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Antonio  Garanillo,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  William  O'Rourke,  Co.  M. 
*Sup.  Sgt.  Alexander  Ruddock,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Adolph  Skivnont,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Edward  A.  Wade,  Co.  M'. 

Pvt.  David  Yazza,  Co.  M. 


SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 


*Pvt.  Stanley  GoliUn,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Albert  E.  Gil)Son,  M.  G.  Co. 
♦Pvt.  Peter  Lchr,  M.  G.  Co. 

Sgt.  Joseph  M.  Sliedlack,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Albert  G.  Valiani,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.   Frank  C.  Viall,  Sup.  Co. 

Pfc.  Fred  I,.  Bloom,  Med.  Det. 
*Pvt.  George   Bosley,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Hernert  E.  Donnoe,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.   Homer  J.  Hall,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Louis  F.  Krezanosky,  Co.  A. 

Corp.  Clarence  E.  Leuthe,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  Dominic   Matarrise,  Co.   A. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Sekarak,  Co.  A. 

Mech.  Simeon  Sidebottom,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Steve  Smakula,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Guy  Thomas,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Russel  H.  Wood,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Silverton  Yusilaylika,  Co.  A. 

(*)  Died  of  wounds. 


*Pvt.  Giddio  Altimonto,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Hubert  Heck,  Co.   H. 

Pvt.  Floyd  Carlton,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Charles  Conley,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Homer  Ewan,"  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Floyd  Hetzer,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Michael  A.  Lambert,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Oresta  Lostumbo,  Co.  B. 
*Pfc.  Lester  Smith,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Edward  R.  Stewart,  Co.  B. 

Pfc.  Albert  L.  Wiley,  Co.  B. 
*Corp.  Alfred  Dessoir,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Porter  Harrison,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Walter  H.  Heaton,  Co,  C. 

Pvt.  John  Ingram,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Mike  Janiecki,  Co.  C. 

Corp.  Leo  H.  Ladds,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Claude  McKinney,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  John  J.  Mayer,  Co.  C. 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison 


259 


SIXTY-FIRST  IXFAXTUy— ConJiniicd 


Pvt.  William  Rozinski,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Fred  C.  Russow,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Theodore  Shagon,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Ernest  E.  Wolf,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Walter  R.  Frazier,  Co.  D. 

Sgt.  Willie  Hargis,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Anthony  Lukatis,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Clarence  Stokey,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Damon  Swisher,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Henry  M.  Tate,  Co.  D. 
*Sgt.  Edgar  F.   Reed,  Co.  E. 
*Pvt.  Allie  Wellington,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Allen  Bunton,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Russell  Cahoe,  Co.  F. 

Corp.  John  H.   Goldner,  Co.   F. 

Pvt.  Charles  S.  Kirschman,  Co.  F. 

Sgt.  Dennis  McAuliflfe,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Alhert  L.  Rappold,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.   William  H.  Toner,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Alliert  Zwiefelhoefer,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.  John  Riehman,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Elmer  Albright,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  George  Dougherty,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  William  G.  Geiger,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  .Andrew 


Pvt.  Oscar  L.  McVollum,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Felix  Adzentoivich,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  John  Callahan,  Jr.,  Co.  I. 
*Corp.  Joseph  J.  Clinton,  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  Harman  J.  Dietzold,  Jr.,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Alexander  Di  Maiilo,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Kenneth  S.  Gardner,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Xormand  A.  Guillarmod,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Edward  Jablauski,  Co.   I. 

Corp.  Raymond  A.  Lowe,  Co.  I. 
♦Pvt.  John  T.  McNeil,  Co.  I. 
*Pvt.  James  H.  Price,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Angelo  Reale,  Co.  I. 
*Corp.  Jonas  G.  Reidenouer,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Joseph  J.  Sorocho,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  James  F.  Timoney,  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  James  Hennessey,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  John  A.  Gerhauser,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Giuseppe  Micheluccio,  Co.  K. 
♦Pvt.  Harold  E.  Price,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Robert  Smith,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Timothy  Whalen,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Daniel  E.  Green,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Edward  Y.  Moriarty,  Co.  M. 
Sieracki,  Co.  M. 


FOURTEEXTH  MACHIXE  GUN  B.\TTALION 


Pfc.  Xunze  Gallo,  Co.   A. 
Pvt.  Dale  D.  Maltice,  Co.  A. 


Sgt.  Bartholomew  O'Leary,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  Thomas  O'Toole. 


SIXTH  IXFAXTRY 


Pvt.  Eevi  F.  Aker,  Hq.  Co. 
♦Pvt.  Phillip  N.  Barry,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Clarence  M.  Massicott,  H(].  Co. 

Pvt.  Xoah  C.  Berry,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  John  Fry,  Co.' A. 
♦Pvt.  John   Gamble,  Co.   .\. 

Pvt.  Ellet  T.  Herbison,  Co.  A. 

-Mech.  Luke  L.  Reiley,  Co.  A. 
♦Pfc.  James  H.  Wade,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Euclid  M.  Lemoine,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Cam  B.  Meadows,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  James  J.  Nicholas,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Morris  T.  Burnett,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Loddie  Eshee,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Clarence  E.  Metz,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Smith,  Co.  C. 
♦Corp.  James  J.  Buckley,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Herman  Armstrong,  Co.  E. 
♦Corp.   Robert  B.  Clifford,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Fines  B.  Jones,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Hubert  Ledford,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Lewis  Maltese,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Victor  Mauro,  Co.  E. 

Pfc.  Clarence  Null,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Amedio  Pastore,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Arthur  Pelo,  Co.  E. 

(♦)   Died  of  wounds. 


Pvt.  Frank  D.  Perrizo,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Arthur  Phillips,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Martin  Ployhort,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Miles  A.  Renninger,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Charlie  Roberts,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Fred  E.  Seidner,  Co.  E. 

I'vt.  Joseph  A.  Arceneaux,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Andy  S.  Brown,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Peter  Dienes,  Co.  F. 
♦Pvt.  Woodford  Lasater,  Co.  F. 

Corp.  Arlie  A.  McCollum,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.  John  Mit.skus,  Co.  F. 

Corp.  Guiseppe  Palma,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Leonard  Schaust,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Charles  Setz,  Co.  F. 
♦Pvt.  Thomas  V.  Sharp,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Richie  Stall,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Anthony  De  Fabbia,  Co.  G. 
'Pvt.  Don  V." Harper,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Thomas  B.  Irl)y,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  John  F.  Mack,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Roland  C.  Minton,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Vernie  Russell,  Co.  G. 

Pfc.  Daniel  h.  Thompson,  Co.  G. 

Sgt.  Myron  Watt.  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Mike  Balhitis,  Co.  H. 


260 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


SIXTH  INFANTRY— ConMnMed 


Pvt.  Dun  Ballard,  Co.  H. 
Pfc.  Amor  Cunningham,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Harry  Gentil,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Louis  Ro.se,  Co.  H. 
•Pvt.  Augu,stin  Santueci,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Charles  F.  Bond,  Co.  I. 
Pfc.  Curtis  Conlcy,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Charles  Culp,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Clitus  Curd,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Richard  B.  Gunter,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Joseph  Hedges,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Jesse  Saunders,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Joseph  Kastorevg,  Co.  K. 

I'vt. 


Corp.  William  MiUigan,  Co.  K. 
Pvt.  John  H.  Aubrey,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  David  Blair,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  William  T.  Chappell,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  James  F.  P.  Jackson,  Co.  L. 
Mech.  Adolph  Lachowitz,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  Steve  Bruce  Maddox,  Co.  I,. 
*Pvt.  Clenn  Mosher,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  Edward  J.  Olmieni,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  Lloyd  T.  Smith,  Co.  L. 
Pvt.  George  F.  Furst,  Co.  M. 
Pvt.  Joe  Phelan,  Co.  M. 
Pvt.   Paschael  Price,  Co.  M. 
Eiiijl  ZinunerMUin,  Co.  M. 


ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  Roliert  Blancy,  Htj.  Co. 

Pvt.  Abraham  L.  De  Walt,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  John  Froesch,  Hq.  Co. 

Pfc.  Peter  Georgess,  Hq.  Co. 

Pvt.  Garbrandt  Haase,  Hq.  Co. 

Corp.   Fred  Lundgrcn,  Hq.  Co. 

Sgt.  Willard  Robinson,  Hq.  Co. 

Pfc.  George  L.  Stauffer,  Hq.  Co. 
*Pvt.  John  S.  Thompson,  Hq.  Co. 

Corp.  Josepli  T.  Kennedy,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Arthur  Marshall,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Byron  A.  Pophani,  M.  G.  Co. 

Pvt.  Harry  Sellard,  M.  G.  Co. 
*Pvt.  Fielding  V.  Meeks,  Med.  Det. 

1st  Sgt.  Harry  W.  Bock,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Grover  C.  Butler,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Elisha  Carr,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Harry  Davey,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Abraham  East,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Addison  Funk,  Co.  A. 
*Pvt.  Elijah  F.  Graham,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  Joseph  Kolar,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Mackesey,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Denver  Bailey,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  James  Carpenter,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Alexander  Denlak,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  Chester  Freese,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  James  E.  Henley,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  George  Hogan,  Co.  B. 
•Pvt.  Carl  J.  Hokel,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  William  Holda,  Co.  B. 
*Pvt.  Horace  Landruin,  C'l.  B. 

Pvt.  Charles  Narde,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  WiUiam  Rose,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Boyd  Stoneburner.  Co.  B. 

Sgt.  J.  P.  Burnbow,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Stephen  C.  Allison,  Co.  C. 

Sgt.  Harry  P.  Hickey,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  James  H.  Helton,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Walter  O'Boyle,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Paleziii,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Nazerina  Primerano,  Co.  C. 

(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


*Pvt.  Edward  L.  Sanders,  Co.  C. 

Pfc.  Luther  Evans,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  William  H.  Eager,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Elmo  Faulkner,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Joel  B.  Findley,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Buenie  Foelkerson,  Co.  D. 

Cook  Henry  Fultz,  Co.  D. 

Corp.  Thomas  Gallagher,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Arthur  Y.  Mann,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Harry  Plasy,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Carl  H.  Schrader,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Edward  Stamp,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Daniel  Bentchyard,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Harry  Bovvers,  Co.  E. 
*Pvt.  James  W.  Crigler,  Co.  E. 
*Pvt.  Harry  G.  Lees,  Co.  E. 

Sgt.  Clyde  Mainwarring,  Co.  E. 

Corp.  Edward  J.  Mescher,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Klaman  Pessin,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  John  J.  Stufflet,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  George  H.  Taggart,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  William  Young,  Co.   E. 
*Pvt.  Ernest  Benion,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Carl  L.  Bennett,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Albert  Bonnickinson,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Fred  O.  Huglies,  Co.  F. 

Pfc.  John  Reininger,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Morris  Birman,  Co.  G. 

Mech.  Charlie  C.  Brower,  Co.  G. 

Sgt.  Matt  Koslowski,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Andrew  Paul,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Willie  F.  Smitli.  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  John  W.  Steffey,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Herman   Timmcr,   Co.   G. 
•Pvt.  John  E.  Wines,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Mario  J.  Besso,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Andrew  M.  Chanios,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Nicholis  Hagenandalakis,  Co. 

Pvt.  Hubert  Hautman,  Co.  H. 

Pfc.   Konstanillo   Kountakis,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Pitman  Mills,  Co.  H. 

Corp.  William  J.  Gardner,  Co.  I. 


H. 


From  the  Me  use  to  the  Loison 


261 


ELEVENTH  ISFANTRY—ConUnued 


*Pvt.  Arthur  Gibson,  Co.  I. 
*Pvt.  Michael  Herbrand,  Co.  I. 

Sgt.  Arthur  Hilison,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Herbert  Hite,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Robert  Hyland,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  William  lUg,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Vito  Pesarcsi,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Johnny  J.  Ro.st,  Co.  I. 

Corp.  Joseph  Sarlo,  Co.  I. 

Corp.  John  S.  Sliva,  Co.  I. 

Pfc.  James  Strasser,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Baron   Bartholomew,  Co. 

Corp.  Cleveland  S.  Blank,  Co 

Corp.  Raymond  Carpenter.  Co. 

Sgt.  Charles  Cline,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Galje  Covington,  Co.   K. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Cunimings,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  James  C.  Davis,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Noah  A.  Dickson,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  George  F.  Doyle,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  John  W.  Estes,  Co.  K. 


Corp.  Zachary  Fuiten,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  James  A.  Gavigan,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  C.  A.  Haun,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Houston   Lang,  Co.   K. 

Pvt.  Michel  O'Donnell,  Co.   K. 

Pvt.  Jesse  Powell,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Newton  P.  Powell.  Co.  K. 
*Pvt.  Jacob  Sauter,  Co.   K. 

Sgt.  Earl  Wakeland,  Co.   K. 

Pvt.  Owen  Williams,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  John  Kovalaski,  Co.  L. 
K.  Pvt.  Agacia  Kov.servich,  Co.  L. 

K.  Pvt.  Harold  R.  Lozier,  Ci>.  L. 

Pvt.  Charles   McClaud,  Co.   L. 

Sgt.  John  J.  Maloney,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Walter  H.  Miguel,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Gilbert  Ratcliff,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Thomas  J.  Wade,  Co.  I>. 
*Pvt.  Godfrey  Allingham,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Antonio  Ferise,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Riderick  Miller,  Co.  M. 
Pvt.  Asa   Kager,  Co.  M. 


FIFTEENTH  M.VCHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Pfc.  Linn  Hough,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Henry  Rosenberg,  Co.  B. 
Sgt.  Ralph  L.  Coffman,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  Ernest  J.  Ditto,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  Benjamin  Smith,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  David  H.  Barry,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Conrad  Carlin,  Co.  C. 


Pvt.  William  E.  Dew,  Co.  C. 
Corp.  Eugene  A.  Egan,  Co.  C. 
Corp.   William  Kenninger,  Co.  C. 
Sgt.  Cliarles  W.  Pliillips,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  Adolph  W.  Staab,  Co.  C. 
Pvt.  William  A.  Watterson,  Co.  C. 
Pfc.  Nicholas  H.  Williams,  Co.  C. 


Pvt.  Frederick  .\.  Miller,  Co.  D. 


SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 


*Pfc.  Dean  Butcher,  Hq.  Co. 
•Sgt.  Albert  S.  Lane,  Co.  B. 

Corp.  Harold  L.   McNew,  Co.   B. 

Pvt.  Ocia  L.  Walker,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Charles  W.  Frederick,  Co.  C. 


Cook  Arthur  E.  Glover,  Co.  C. 

Wag.  Artie  H.  Gray,  Co.  D. 
•Pvt.  Swan  O.  Peterson,  Co.  E. 
*Sgt.  Albert  Chavat,  Co.  F. 
*Pfc.  David  A.  Brown,  Co.  F. 


THIRTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Pvt.  Arthur  Erickson,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Thomas  P.  McCole,  Co.  A. 


Wag.  Robert  E.  Lagrone,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  Nick  O'Daniels,  Co.  B. 


NINTH  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 


Pvt.  Gunnar  K.  Cassell. 
Pvt.  Hugh  O.  Davis. 
*Pvt.  Irving  L.  Graves. 


Corp.  Dan  E.  Lancaster. 
Corp.  Louis  Monroe. 
Corp.  Karl  R.  Montoux. 
Pfc.  Hiram  Williams. 


(*)   Died  of  wounds. 


262  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

BATTALION   AND    HIGHER   COMMANDERS    IN    FIFTH    DIVISION 

IN  SECOND  PHASE  ARGONNE-MEUSE  OPERATION 

Major  General  Hanson  E.  Ely,  Commanding  Division. 
Captain  Arthur  P.  Watson,  Aide  de  Camp. 

GENERAL  STAFF 

Colonel  Clement  A.  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Stephen  C.  Reynolds,  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Herbert  Parsons,  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  (i-2. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Ralph  W.  Kinghan,  Assistant  Cliief  of  Staff,  G-3. 

PRINXIPAL  STAFF  OFFICERS 

Colonel  Robert  H.  Pierson,  Division  Surgeon. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Gilbert  M.  Allen,  Division  Maehine  Gun  Offieer. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  P.  James  Cosgrave,  Division  Judge  Advocate. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Alvin  G.  Gutensohn,  Division  Signal  Officer. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Charles  MeaLs,  Division  Quarternuister. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  David   P.   Wood,  Division  Adjutant. 

Major  Jacob  C.  R.  Peabody,  Division   Inspector. 

Captain  Raymond  Woodson,  Division  Ordnance  Officer  to  November  Cth. 

Major  James  Stewart,  Division  Ordnance  Officer  from  November  7th. 

Major  B.  H.  Namm,  Division  Gas  Officer. 

Captain  WiUard  A.  Knapp,  Secretary  to  General  Staff. 

NINTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Joseph  C.  Castner,  Commanding  brigade. 
First  Lieutenant  Rowland  H.  Peacock,  Aide  de  Camp. 
Major  Ray  K.  Chalfant,  Brigade  Adjutant. 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Frank  B.  Hawkins,  Commanding  regiment. 

Major  George  R.   Howitt,  Couuuanding  (irst  liattalion. 

Ca])tain  ,Tohn  B.  Warfield,  Couuuanding  second  liattalion,  killed  November  3rd. 

Captain   Frederic  C.  Dose,  Ci'uuuanding  second  liatatlion,  November  4-th  to  5th. 

Captain   Fred  N.  Roe,  Commanding  second  battalion  from  Noveml)er  (ith. 

Major  Frederick  A.  Barker,  Commanding  third  ))attalion. 

SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Phillip  B.  Peyton,  Couuuanding  regiment. 
Captain  Merritt  E.  Olmstead,  Commanding  first  liattalion. 
Major  Alexander  N.  Stark,  Commanding  second  liattalion. 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Lowe  A.  McClure,  Commanding  tliird  battalion. 


FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Major  Jens  A.  Doe,  Commanding  liattalion  to  November  Tih. 
Major  Tom  Fox,  Commanding  battalion  from  Novemlier  8th. 


From  the  Meuse  to  the  Loison  263 

TENTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE 

Brigadier  General  Paul  B.  Malone,  Commanding  brigade. 
Major  George  H.  van  de  Steeg,  Brigade  Adjutant. 

SIXTH  INFANTRY 

Colonel  Henry  J.  Hunt,  Commanding  regiment. 

Captain  Lawrence  B.  Keiser,  Commanding  first  battalion. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Courtney  H.  Hodges,  Commanding  second  battalion  to  November  9th. 

Captain  Richard  M.  Wightman,  Commanding  second  battalion  from  November  9th. 

Captain  Guy  L.  Hartman,  Commanding  third  battalion  to  November  8th. 

Major  Jolin  W.  Leonard,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  November  9th. 

ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 

Lieutenant  Colonel  R.  John  West,  Commanding  regiment  to  October  29th. 
Colonel  Robert  H.  Peck,  Commanding  regiment  from  October  30th. 
Captain  John  F.  Harris,  Commanding  first  battalion  to  November  7th. 
Captain  E.  D.  Colvin,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  November  8th. 
Captain  Walter  C.  Cowart,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
Major  Richard  C.  Birmingham,  Commanding  third  battalion. 

FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
Major  William  M.  Grimes,  Commanding  battalion. 

SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 

Colonel  Earl  G.  Paules,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  William  M.  Hoge,  Jr.,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  Wyman  R.  Swan,  Commanding  second  battalion. 
First  Lieutenant  Peter  Murphy,  Commanding  train. 

THIRTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
Major  Walton  H.  Walker,  Commanding  battalion. 

NINTH  FIELD  SIGNAL  BATTALION 
Major  Dean  B.  Small,  Commanding  battalion. 

HEADQUARTERS  TROOP 
Captain  Carl  U.  Luers,  Commanding  troop. 

FIFTH  DIVISION  TRAINS 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Harry  E.  Comstock,  Commanding  trains. 

FIFTH  SUPPLY  TRAIN 
Major  Oral  E.  Clark,  Commanding  train. 


264  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

FIFTH  AMMUNITION  TRAIN 

Major  Raymond  Dickson,  Commanding  train. 

Captain  Ryland  D.  Woodson,  Commanding  motor  battalion. 

Captain  Tasso  H.  Swartz,  Commanding  horsed  battalion. 

FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIN 

Lieutenant  Colonel  Carey  J.  Vaux,  Commanding  train. 
Major  Frederic  J.  Quigley,  Director  of  Field  Hospitals. 
Captain  James  H.  Quinn,  Director  of  Ambulance  Companies. 

FIFTH  MILITARY  POLICE 
Major  William  H.  Gill,  Commanding  military  police. 


Chapter  VIII 


IN  THE  ARMY  OF  OCCUPATION 


HE  enactment  of  the  armistice  did  not  mean  for 
tlie  Fifth  Division  the  rehixation  of  vigilance  in 
the  shghtest.  nor  the  cessation  of  preparedness  to 
resume  liostihties  at  a  moment's  notice.  The 
enemy,  however,  seemed  to  consider  the  war  at 
an  end,  and  after  11  o'clock  showed  himself 
everywhere  in  front  of  our  positions.  The  Ger- 
mans seemed  curious  to  see  these  soldiers  of  ours 
wlio  had  ])eeii  driving'  them  so  hurriedly  out  of 
their  long-held  French  territory,  and  oidy  threats  of  making  them 
prisoners  of  war  kept  tlie  Hoche  from  persisting  in  their  attempts  at 
fraternization.  One  youthfid  German  wandered  into  our  lines,  sal- 
vaged himself  an  Ajnerican  overseas  cap  and  gazed  in  wonder  at 
ever\^thing  around  him.  retui-ning  to  his  own  people  only  when  forced 
out  by  our  guards.  A  German  officer  insisted  on  watering  his  horse 
in  the  Loison  behind  Jametz  and  desisted  only  on  the  stern  ultimatum 
that  he  had  just  two  minutes  to  clear  out. 

The  halt  of  the  advance  brought  well-earned  rest  to  the  weary 
doughboys  and  permitted  the  trains  to  catch  up  with  hot  food  and 
clean  clothes.  On  November  12th  the  Sixth  and  Sixtieth  took  over 
the  whole  Division  front.  The  Eleventh  moved  back  to  the  old  Ger- 
man barracks  in  Eois  de  Remoiville  and  on  the  13th  continued  to 
Liny.  The  Sixty-first  returned  to  Milly.  Division  Headcjuarters 
went  to  Lion  and  other  units  of  the  Division  were  assembled  on  the 
east  side  of  the  Meuse. 

The  war  was  not  over  for  the  Sanitary  Train.  The  wounded  con- 
tinued to  pass  through  their  stations  at  Louppy,  Brandeville,  Mur- 
vaux,  Milly  and  Dun  during  the  remainder  of  the  11th.  Except  for 
the  strange  stillness  of  the  ])ig  guns  it  was  hai-d  to  realize  that  the 
fighting  was  ended.  INIore  than  7,000  battle  casualties,  besides  many 
hundreds  of  sick  and  injured,  had  been  cared  for  by  our  ever- work- 
ing, faithful  men  of  the  Medical  Corps  in  the  Meuse- Argonne  opera- 


Iji  the  Army  of  Occupation  267 

tions.  And  now  began  an  influx  of  another  sort.  Men  who  had 
fought  on  and  undergone  all  kinds  of  hardships  during  the  strenuous 
weeks,  all  the  while  suffering  from  diarrhea,  broncliitis,  grippe  or 
slight  wounds  which  went  ignored  while  their  services  were  so  badly 
needed,  now  came  in  large  numbers  to  the  hospitals. 

Sick  men  were  cared  for  in  the  ruined  villages  and  men  weak 
from  privation  and  incessant  toil  were  strengthened  by  quiet  rest 
and  ])lenty  of  nourishing  hot  food.  Tlie  troops  had  an  opportunity 
to  liathe  and  rid  themselves  of  that  "constant  trench  companion,"  the 
cootie.  French  clothing,  although  most  always  salvaged  and  reno- 
vated, was  an  unmeasurable  relief  after  the  torn,  muddy  uniforms 
which  practically  no  one  had  removed  even  once  in  the  past  month. 

The  Division  was  to  have  been  marched  back  to  the  Nantillois 
area,  but  as  the  First  Division  was  occupying  that  territory  the 
Fiftli  continued  in  its  j^osition,  relieved  in  the  front  lines  by  the 
Ninetieth  and  Thirty-second  Divisions.  A  thorough  police  was 
made  of  the  entire  area.  The  Third  Field  Artillery  Brigade  buried 
all  dead  horses,  salvaged  artillery  amiminition  and  took  captured 
artillery  materiel  to  the  Division  sahage  diunp  at  Doulcon.  The 
infantrymen  and  machine  gunners  of  the  Ninth  and  Tenth  Brigades 
buried  the  dead  in  their  old  sectors,  salvaged  all  United  States  and 
enemy  military  pro])erty  and  loaded  it  on  the  trucks  of  the  Ammuni- 
tion Train  to  be  hauled  to  Doulcon.  Tlie  work  of  feeding  the  French 
civilians  who  had  been  liberated  in  their  villages  and  those  who  were 
already  retm-ning  througli  the  lines  was  carried  out  l)y  the  company 
kitchens. 

The  American  Third  Army  was  being  formed  to  follow  up  the 
withdrawing  Germans  and  to  become  the  Army  of  Occupation.  The 
Third  Corps  became  a  part  of  the  new  army  and  its  sector  was  taken 
over  by  the  Fifth  Corps,  composed  now  of  the  Fifth  and  Ninetieth 
Divisions.  The  Eleventh  Infantry  moved  back  to  the  old  front  lines 
to  occupy  the  Division's  right  half  of  the  Corjis  sector,  from  Louppy 
to  A'^illers-les-Mangiennes.  Guard  posts  were  established  on  all  the 
roads  to  control  the  movement  of  returning  civilians  and  released 
prisoners  of  war,  and  each  day  officers'  patrols  went  out  to  prevent 
disorders,  depredation  and  destruction.  Detachments  were  sent  on 
to  Si^incourt,  Longuyon,  Virton  and  Margut  to  receive  persons  and 
materiel  turned  over  in  accordance  with  the  terms  of  the  armistice. 

On  November  22nd  the  forward  movement  of  the  Third  Army 
began.  Major  General  Ely,  commanding  the  Fifth  Division,  was 
named  as  Commander  of  the  Line  of  Communications.     The  Divi- 


In  the  Army  of  Occupation  269 

sion  was  included  in  the  Scventli  Coi-ps  with  the  Eighty-ninth  and 
Ninetieth  Divisions,  but  was  detached  and  placed  under  the  direct 
orders  of  the  Third  Army  Commander.  JNIuch  of  the  Red  Diamond 
materiel  had  been  turned  over  to  the  divisions  that  were  to  form  the 
van  of  the  Rhine-bound  forces,  but  the  Division  began  its  move  to 
the  Longwy-Longuyon  district  on  the  22nd.  ITead(iuarters  were 
established  at  Longuyon  on  the  28rd.  By  the  2.5tli  the  Division  was 
established  in  the  new  area.  The  Sixth  and  Eleventh  Infantry  and 
the  Thirteenth  Machine  (iun  Battalion  were  at  I^ongwy,  where  Gen- 
eral Malone  assumed  command  of  the  First  and  Second  Police 
Zones.  The  Sixtictli  and  Sixty-first  Infantry,  Seventh  Engineers 
and  the  Trains  were  at  I^onguyon.  The  Seventh  Engineer  Train 
and  the  Fourteenth  and  Fifteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalions  were 
still  on  the  Meuse  waiting  for  horse  transportation,  disposing  of  the 
Division's  salvage  and  guarding  property. 

The  Sixth  Infantry  was  selected  to  become  the  garrison  of 
Treves,  the  gateway  city  of  Germany,  and  on  December  1st  started 
to  its  post  of  honor,  entering  the  enemy's  country  behind  the  advance 
guards  of  the  First  Division.  Colonel  Hunt  became  the  military 
commander  of  the  city,  where  the  Sixth  remained  until  February, 
1919. 

As  the  advance  divisions  cleared  Luxembourg  the  elements  of 
the  Fifth  moved  on  up  along  the  line  of  communications.  On 
November  27th  Company  M  of  the  Sixty-first  Infantry  had  marched 
to  Hollerich,  Luxembourg,  for  duty  at  Third  Army  Headquarters 
and  on  the  iiOth  the  remainder  of  the  regiment  moved  to  Nieder- 
kerschen.  The  units  of  the  Division  were  all  engaged  in  guarding 
bridges  and  tunnels,  enemy  materiel  depots,  salvage  dumps,  a  steel 
plant  at  Steinfort  and  in  performing  various  other  duties  in  south- 
eastern Belgium,  southern  lAixembourg,  northeastern  France  and 
northwestern  I^orraine  in  connection  with  maintaining  the  line  of 
communications  of  our  Army  of  Occupation.  The  Fifth  Field 
Artillery  Brigade  rejtjined  the  Division  on  December  5th. 

Division  Headquarters  moved  to  Hollerich,  on  the  outskirts  of 
Luxembourg  City  on  December  4th,  then  to  Merl,  nearby,  on  the 
11th.  A  final  change  was  made  to  Esch-sur-Alzette  on  the  17th. 
On  December  12th  the  Fifth  Division  was  jjlaeed  in  the  Sixth  Corps 
of  the  Second  Army,  with  the  Seventh  Division  located  in  the 
Saizerais  area  of  France,  and  the  Thirty-third  occupying  that  part 
of  liUxembourg  north  of  the  city  of  Luxembourg.  The  various 
units  of  the  Fifth  Division  moved  up  into  the  Grand  Duchy  during 


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s 


In  the  Army  of  Occupation  271 

the  month  of  December,  and  when  the  year  ended  were  stationed  as 
follows : 

Division    Headquarters Ksch-sur-Alzette. 

Headquarters    Troop Eseh-sur-Alzette. 

Ninth  Infantrj'  Brigade  Headquarters.  .Esch-sur-Alzette. 

Sixtieth    Infantry Esch,      Bettemburg,       Klein-Bettange,      Sassenheini, 

Selanee  (Belgium). 
Sixty-first    Infantry Differdange,  Pettange,  Rodange,  Mersch,  Hondelange 

(Belgium),  Musson   (Belgium). 

Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion Oberkorn,  Aubange  (Bclghim),  Athus   (Belgium). 

Tenth  Infantry  Brigade  Headquarters.  .Esch-sur-Ab.ette. 

Sixth   Infantry Treves  (Germany). 

Eleventh    Infantry Schifflange,  Mondercangc,  E.sch,  Treve.s   (Germany). 

Fifteenth   Machine   Gun    Battalion Bergem,  Ehlange. 

Fifth     Field     Artillery     Brigade     Head- 
quarters     Dudelange. 

Nineteenth    Field   Artillery Hesperange,  Altzange,  Fennange,  Krauthem,  Rocser. 

Twentieth   Field   Artillery Peppange,  I.ivange.  Bivange,  Berchem,  I.eudelange. 

Twenty-first  Field  Artillery Dudelange,  Burange,  Hellange. 

Seventh    Engineers Rumelange. 

Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion Budersberg. 

Ninth  Field  Signal  Battalion Esch-sur-Alzette. 

Fifth  Train  Headquarters Esch-sur-Alzette. 

Fifth   Supply  Train Kayl,  St.  Nazaire  (France)    (Co.  D  on  D.  S.). 

Seventh    Engineer    Train Rumelange. 

Fifth  Ammunition  Train Bettemburg,  I.ongwy  area  in   France. 

Fifth    Sanitary   Train Dipach,  Esch,  Bettange,  Longwy  (France),  Longuyon 

(France). 

Fifth  Military  Police  Company Esch-sur-Alzette. 

Fifth  Mobile  Ordnance  Repair  Shop Bettemburg. 

Fifth  Mobile  Veterinary  Section Huncherange. 

At  Esch  were  also  minor  nnits:  U.  S.  Army  Post  Office  Xo. 
745,  Sales  Commissary  Unit  No.  302.  Clothing  T^nit  Xo.  304, 
Laundry  Unit  No.  319.  Service  Park  Unit  Xo.  3-22,  Machine  Shop 
Truck  Unit  Xo.  393.  At  Steinbrucken  were  the  Casual  Detach- 
ment and  Salvage  Unit  Xo.  301.  The  Remount  Station  was  at 
Reckange.  INIany  guard  detachments  were  located  throughout  the 
Divisional  area  in  Luxemboiu-g.  Belgium  and  France. 

The  whole  task  of  the  Red  Diamond  was  the  guarding  and  main- 
taining of  the  line  of  communications  of  the  Amei'ican  Army  of  Occu- 
pation of  Germany  and  at  the  same  time  keeping  up  its  high  standard 
of  efficiency,  discipline  and  morale  for  any  possible  move  into  the 
territory  of  the  enemy.  Training  schedules  were  put  into  force  in  all 
units,  with  plenty  of  rest  and  recreation,  including  athletics  and  en- 
tertainments of  eveiy  sort. 

^^Hien  the  homeward  movement  of  the  American  Expeditionary 
Forces  began  the  Fifth  Division  began  to  lose  many  of  its  officers 
and  men.  who  were  transferred  to  other  divisions  or  returned  to  the 
United  States  as  casuals.  In  ^larch  General  ]Malone,  commander 
of  the  Tenth  Brigade,  left  the  Fifth  to  take  command  of  the  Casual 


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In  the  Art))//  of  Occupation  273 

Camp  at  St.  Aignan,  France.  On  April  Ist  the  Division  was  re- 
assigned to  tlie  Third  Army  and  placed  again  in  the  Seventh  Corps. 
On  April  12th  the  Fifth  took  o^-er  the  whole  of  Luxemhourg  when 
the  Thirty-third  Division  in  the  northern  portion  of  the  Diiehy  was 
placed  under  the  command  of  the  S.  O.  S.  for  return  to  America. 
Likewise  on  April  26th  the  Red  Diamond  took  charge  of  all  the  Iaix- 
emhourg-Germany  frontier  guards  when  the  Kighty-ninth  Division 
received  orders  to  go  home. 

On  April  30th,  1010.  the  entire  Division  was  reviewed  hy  Gen- 
eral Pershing.  On  that  occasion  the  Commander-in-Chief  decorated 
with  the  Distinguished  Service  ^ledal.  Major  General  Ely,  Com- 
manding the  Fifth  Division;  Brigadier  General  Castner,  Command- 
ing the  Ninth  Brigade:  Colonel  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff,  and  Colonel 
Peyton,  Commanding  the  Sixty-fii-st  Infantry,  and  hestowed  upon 
the  winners  fifty-two  of  the  one  hundred  and  ninety-nine  Distin- 
guished Service  Crosses  awarded  to  men  of  the  Division. 

For  the  excellent  condition  of  troops  and  e(juipment  and  on  the 
s])lendid  record  of  the  Red  Diamond  Division  in  l)attle  and  as  a  part 
of  the  Army  of  Occupation,  General  Pershing  extended  his  praise 
to  General  Ely  in  a  letter,  puhlished  in  General  Orders  as  follows: 

"It  is  a  pleasant  duty  for  me  to  congratulate  you  and  through 
you  the  officers  and  men  of  the  Fifth  Division  on  the  inspection  and 
review  held  at  Esch  on  April  3()th.  The  smart  appearance  of  all 
ranks  as  well  as  the  fine  shape  in  which  I  found  your  horse  trans- 
I)ort  are  signs  of  the  high  morale  which  permeates  youi'  Division  and 
the  individual  pride  which  each  man  takes  in  your  splendid  fighting 
record. 

"Arriving  in  England  towards  the  end  of  April,  1018,  it  was 
sent  at  once  to  the  area  near  Bar-sur-Auhe  for  its  regular  course  f)f 
training.  After  one  month  it  was  hurried  into  the  quiet  Anould 
sector  on  the  Vosges  front,  where  it  continued  its  training  until  the 
mi<ldle  of  July.  The  Commanding  General  of  the  Division  at  that 
time  took  command  of  the  St.  Die  sector  on  the  same  front.  Toward 
the  end  of  August  the  Division  joined  the  First  Army  and  on  Sep- 
temher  11th  it  played  its  part  in  the  successful  St.  IMihiel  offensive. 
The  attack  was  continued  until  Se])temher  14th.  during  which  time 
severe  fighting  was  had  in  the  Bois  de  Bonvaux  and  the  Bois  de 
Grand  Fontaine,  which  will  always  he  names  to  he  rememhered  hy 
the  Division.  Relieved  from  the  line  on  September  16th,  after  a 
total  advance  of  about  7  kilometers,  the  Division  rested  until  October 
12th,  when  it  was  thrown  into  the  Meuse-Argonne  offensive.  It  re- 
mained in  this  attack  for  ten  days  under  constant  machine  gun  and 


(hir    of    tlif    licciiti/-ii'nir    Fifth    Division    hatile    moniimriifs    erecicd    hy    tlie 

Divixion    to  mark  its   latttlcfields    in    the   Mfiisc-.lrgoiuic, 

St.  MiJiiel  and  Frapellc  operations. 


In  the  Army  of  Occupation  275 

heavy  artillery  fire  from  the  eastern  heights  of  the  Meuse,  capturing 
the  Bois  de  la  Pultiere  and  the  Bois  des  Rappes.  On  October  23rd 
the  Division  was  relieved  from  the  battle.  Four  days  later  it  retm-ned 
to  the  attack,  remaining  in  the  battle  until  the  cessation  of  hostilities 
on  November  11th.  During  this  time  it  captured  among  other  places 
Aincreville,  Mouzay  and  Vilosnes,  advancing  21  kilometers  into  the 
enemy's  line.  The  feat  of  arms,  however,  which  marks  especially 
the  Division's  ability  as  a  fighting  unit,  was  the  crossing  of  the 
Meuse  River  and  the  establislmient  of  a  bridgehead  on  the  eastern 
bank.  This  operation  was  one  of  the  most  brilliant  military  feats  in 
the  history  of  the  American  Ai'my  in  France. 

"Since  the  Armistice  the  Division  has  formed  a  portion  of  the 
Army  of  Occupation,  and  in  its  conduct  under  difficult  conditions 
there  I  take  especial  pride.  Every  man  can  rest  assured  of  the 
gratitude  of  the  American  jjeople  for  his  share  in  the  final  victory, 
of  my  appreciation  of  his  achievements,  and  of  the  deep  interest 
which  I  shall  take  in  the  future  of  all  ranks." 

On  Majr  11th  orders  came  relieving  the  Fifth  Division  from 
duty  with  the  Army  of  Occupation  and  placing  it  under  the  authority 
of  the  Commanding  General,  Services  of  Supply,  for  return  to  the 
United  States.  Lieutenant  General  Liggett,  Commanding  the  Third 
Army,  bade  farewell  to  the  Red  Diamond  Division  in  a  letter  pub- 
lished in  General  Orders  as  follows: 

"The  Army  Commander  wishes  to  exj^ress  to  the  Commanding 
General,  the  officers  and  men  of  the  Fifth  Division  his  appreciation 
of  the  services  of  the  Division  during  the  war. 

"After  an  occupancy  of  a  defensive  sector  in  the  Vosges,  you 
participated  in  the  St.  ]Mihiel  offensive,  where  you  attained  your 
objectives  with  that  characteristic  American  dash.  In  the  Meuse- 
Argonne  ojieration,  j'om-  crossing  of  the  INIeuse  was  one  of  the 
brilliant  exploits  of  the  war. 

"As  one  of  the  divisions  forming  the  Army  of  Occupation,  you 
have  rendered  most  valuable  services  in  maintaining  order,  in  spite 
of  the  delicacy  of  the  situation,  amongst  the  people  of  the  Grand 
Duchy  of  Luxembourg,  liberated  from  four  years  of  German  occu- 
pation. In  the  performance  of  this  duty,  as  in  the  deportment  of 
your  officers  and  men,  you  have  in  every  way  met  the  expectation  of 
the  Army  Commander  and  reflected  great  credit  upon  the  service." 

The  hope  of  the  Red  Diamond  men  for  a  speedy  return  to  their 
homeland  was  blasted,  however,  for  the  orders  which  directed  that 
the  movement  to  Brest  should  begin  on  May  23rd  were  suspended 
on  May  20th.     On  account  of  the  uncertainty  of  Germany's  readi- 


276  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ness  to  sign  the  prepared  Peace  Treaty,  plans  were  made  for  a 
further  invasion  of  Eocheland.  The  Fifth  Division  was  returned  to 
the  Third  Army  for  administrative  purj)oses,  hut  the  equipment  that 
luul  l)een  tui-ned  in  was  not  reissued,  lint  at  hist  orders  were  re- 
ceived to  entrain  for  the  Port  of  Emharkation  at  Brest  and  at  noon 
on  July  4th  the  tirst  trains  left  the  Uuchy  of  Luxenihourg  and  the 
heart  of  the  Red  Diamond  Division  pulsed  with  joyous  anticipation. 
Division  Headquarters  left  Esch  on  the  last  train  on  July  9th,  all 
units  arriving  at  Brest  without  mishap.  The  Division  passed  through 
the  Port  of  Emharkation  in  record  time,  and  received  from  Brigadier 
General  Smedley  D.  Butler,  in  command  thereat,  high  compliments 
for  its  appearance,  equipment  and  physical  condition. 

Units  were  embarked  and  began  sailing  on  July  12th,  Division 
Headquarters  sailed  on  board  the  U.  S.  S.  Agamemnon  (formerly 
the  pride  of  the  North-German  Lloj'd,  The  Kaiser  Wilhelm  II)  on 
July  13th,  and  arrived  at  Hoboken,  N.  J.,  on  July  "ilst,  proceeding 
to  Camp  Merritt,  N.  J.,  where  orders  were  received  that  Headquar- 
ters, the  Infantry  Regiments,  the  Engineer  Regiment,  the  Signal 
Battalion,  Trains  and  Special  Units  were  to  proceed  to  Camp  Gor- 
don, Georgia,  for  station.  The  Artillery  Regiments  were  ordered  to 
Camp  Bragg,  South  Carolina,  for  station. 

At  Camps  Merritt  and  Mills  the  f)fHcers  and  men  who  liad  en- 
tered the  service  for  the  period  of  the  emergency  said  farewell  to 
their  organizations,  in  which  they  had  served  so  faithfully  and  well, 
and  departed  for  the  ^'arious  demol)ilization  centers  to  be  discharged. 
Many  new  officers  will  command  it,  and  new  faces  help  to  fill  the 
ranks  of  the  Fifth  Division  henceforward — may  our  immortal  dead 
who  sleep  in  France  and  the  gallant  deeds  of  those  who  siu'vived 
always  be  an  inspiration  and  a  guide.  And  so  endeth  a  great  adven- 
ture! The  Red  Diamond  had  not  come  hack  until  it  was  over 
"Over  there." 


Chapter  IX 
FIFTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY  BRIGADE  AFTER 

ST.  MIIIIEL 


II E  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  rejoined  the 
Division  in  Luxenil)our^'  on  Deecniber  .3th, 
1918,  after  two  and  a  half  months'  separation. 
It  had  seen  service  with  three  different  divisions, 
having  remained  in  the  Thianeonrt-Pont-a- 
Mousson  sector  after  the  St.  JNIihiel  Operation 
as  sector  artillery. 

The    artillery    of    the 
whicli    relieved    the 


sion, 


Seventy-eiglith  Divi- 
Fifth  on  Se2)tember 
17th,  liad  not  at  that  time  completed  its  training  in  the  S.  O.  S.,  so  it 
fell  to  the  lot  of  the  Fifth  Brigade  to  remain  behind  and  become  at- 
tached to  the  National  Army  Division.  In  addition  to  replacing  the 
Fifth  Division  in  the  line  the  Seventy-eighth  had  also  taken  over  the 
sector  of  the  Seccjiid  Division;  so  on  September  16th  the  Nineteenth 
Field  Artillery  relieved  the  Twelfth  Field  Artillery  in  the  area  south 
of  Thiaucourt.  P.  C.  was  established  in  Bois  du  Beau  Vallon.  The 
Twentieth  distributed  its  batteries  in  the  neighborhood  of  Bois  des 
Saulx  and  Bois  d'Heiclie,  with  P.  C.  in  Bois  d'Heiche.  The  heavy 
Twenty-first  had  headquarters  with  its  fii'st  battalion  in  Bois  du  Four, 
second  battalion  in  Bois  de  Beau  Vallon  and  third  battalion  in  Bois 
d'Heiche. 

The  Germans  very  evidently  expected  the  Americans  to  make 
a  further  push  in  the  direction  of  INIetz,  for  they  kept  their  reserves 
massed  behind  the  newly-established  lines  and  their  artillery  for  two 
weeks  was  very  active  in  searching  out  our  battery  positions.  The 
enemy's  harassing  fire  l)ecame  much  more  severe  than  during  the 
drive;  the  Bodies  had  had  time  to  steady  themselves  and  reorganize. 
Our  artillery  had  gone  through  the  offensive  with  practically  no 
losses,  but  now  the  regular  shelling  of  the  vicinities  of  the  battery 
positions  and  of  the  roads  over  which  the  supplies  had  to  be  brought 
up  caused  frequent  casualties.     The  result  was  that  the  Fifth  Artil- 


a 

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s 


Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  After  St.  Mihiel  279 

lery  Brigade  during  its  month  and  a  half  in  tliis  supposedly  quiet 
sector  suffered  much  heavier  losses  in  personnel  and  guns  injured 
than  did  the  artillery  working  with  the  Fifth  Division  in  the  Meuse- 
Argonne  Offensive. 

The  superiority  that  the  American  air  forces  had  enjoyed  dm-ing 
the  drive  was  gone,  practicalh'  all  the  Allied  planes  having  been 
withdrawn  to  participate  in  the  great  offensive  farther  north.  Ac- 
cordingly, Hun  aviators  swept  the  areas  unopposed  save  by  anti-air- 
craft batteries,  surveying  the  scene  of  their  recent  defeat,  hunting 
out  batter}^  positions  and  munition  dumps,  sweeping  down  with  ma- 
chine guns  on  working  parties  by  day  and  taking  photographs  by 
flash-bomb  light  at  night.  Aerial  adjustments  on  Thiaucourt  and 
Vieville  were  almost  daily  occurrences. 

The  continual  shelling  of  the  main  Thiaucourt-Regnieville  road 
and  other  routes,  and  the  visibility  of  the  liigliways  from  the  German 
lines  on  the  hills  south  of  the  Rupt  de  Mad  filled  the  lives  of  the 
ammunition  details  with  thrills  and  narrow  escapes.  Powder  and 
shells  and  food  had  to  be  hauled  up  to  tlie  positions  at  night  from  the 
rear  echelons,  and  dri\'ers  learned  to  time  their  passage  of  crossroads 
and  other  prominent  points  so  as  to  avoid  the  clock-regular  fire  of  the 
methodical  Boche  artillerymen.  Telephone  linesmen  were  always 
busy  repairing  their  wires  broken  ])y  the  enemy  shrapnel  and  sliell. 

The  climax  of  the  past  St.  JNIihiel  activity  came  with  the  series 
of  concerted  raids  that  were  executed  along  the  entire  American 
front  when  the  Meuse-Argonne  offensive  was  begun  on  September 
26th.  To  assist  the  Seventy-eighth  Division  in  its  raid  on  the  night 
of  the  25-26th,  all  the  batteries  delivered  effective  one-hour  prepara- 
tory bombardments.  Following  the  raid  the  Germans  counterat- 
tacked and  the  artillery  was  called  up  to  put  dovsn  heavy  C.  O.  P. 
fire. 

The  Boche  artillery  fire  had  been  very  heavy  since  the  infantry 
raid  on  the  22nd-23rd,  when  Battery  C  of  the  Nineteenth  and  the 
third  battalion  of  the  Twenty-first  had  been  accurately  located.  Two 
men  of  the  Nineteenth  and  two  of  the  Twenty-first  were  killed.  Cap- 
tain William  C.  Denckel  of  the  Twenty-first  was  seriously  gassed 
when  a  shell  exploded  at  liis  feet  and  Lieutenant  Benjamin  B.  Rowley 
of  the  Nineteenth  was  wounded.  Four  men  of  the  Nineteenth,  three 
of  the  Twentieth  and  seven  of  the  Twenty-first  were  wounded.  Two 
of  the  heavjr  155  nmi.  guns  of  Battery  F  of  the  Twenty-first  were 
put  out  of  action  on  the  24th  by  direct  hits,  and  next  day  Battery  D 
of  the  Twentieth  had  one  of  its  75's  knocked  out. 


^ 


Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  After  St.  M Uriel  281 

Enemy  fire  on  the  "Jtith  and  throughout  the  ensuing  week  was 
even  more  severe,  kilhng  17  men  of  the  Nineteenth,  10  of  the  Twen- 
tieth and  2  of  the  Twenty-first.  Fifty-five  men  of  the  Brigade  were 
wounded.  Second  Lieutenant  Archibald  C.  Coats  of  the  Nineteenth 
was  severly  gassed  and  died  of  his  wounds  on  October  28th.  Lieu- 
tenants Lee  Hirsch  and  William  B.  Sunmier  of  the  Nineteenth  were 
wounded  and  Captain  Virgil  L.  Minear  of  the  Twentieth  was 
gassed.  Batteries  E  and  F  of  the  Nineteenth  evacuated  their  posi- 
tions in  Bois  d'lleiche  and  went  into  new  positions  just  south  of 
Vieville  and  the  third  battalion  of  the  Twenty-first  left  Bois  d'Heiche 
for  Bois  du  Pretre,  near  Montauville.  While  the  teams  of  Batterj^ 
E  were  coming  up  the  Thiaucourt  road  on  the  night  of  October  3rd 
to  move  the  big  howitzers  a  shell  dropped  under  a  swing  horse  and 
blew  it  to  pieces.  The  driver  was  thrown  into  a  pile  of  barbed  wire 
but  miinjured.  Three  neigliboring  drivers  were  wounded  and  six 
other  horses  were  killed. 

The  Seventy-eightli  Division  was  withdrawn  from  the  line  on 
October  3rd,  its  sector  being  divided  between  the  adjoining  di\'isions, 
the  Ninetieth  on  the  right  and  the  Twenty-eighth  on  the  left.  The 
Fifth  Brigade  was  attached  to  the  Ninetietli  Division.  The  Nine- 
teenth Field  Artillery  was  relieved  in  its  positions  south  of  Thiau- 
ct)in't  by  the  340th  F.  A.  and  moved  to  the  Foret  de  Puvenelle.  P. 
C.  was  established  at  Montau\  ille.  Raids  were  supported  and  re- 
taliatory bombardments  executed  for  the  Ninetieth  in  the  week's 
service  with  that  di\ision. 

The  Seventh  Division  took  over  its  first  liattle  sector  on  Octo- 
ber 10th,  relieving  the  Ninetieth.  The  Fifth  Brigade  now  began 
work  for  the  foiu'th  unit  it  had  ser\'ed  with  in  a  month.  By  tliis  time 
the  Germans  had  fin;illy  realized  that  the  battle  had  shifted  from  the 
old  St.  Miliiel  sector  and  they  had  withdrawn  their  masses  of  reserves 
to  strengthen  their  hard-pressed  forces  on  the  Meuse  and  in  the  Ar- 
gonne.  Thus  when  tlie  inexperienced  doughboys  of  the  Hourglass 
Division  took  over  the  lines  from  Thiaucourt  to  Pont-a-Mousson, 
the  front  had  become  calm,  except  for  the  regular  harassing  fire. 

Battery  positions  were  changed  from  time  to  time  to  include  new 
fields  of  fire,  and  the  artillerymen  located  themselves  in  the  old  Ger- 
man shelters  that  were  thickly  scattered  throughout  the  area.  Those 
concrete  dugouts  made  very  good  living  places,  even  if  they  did  con- 
tain cooties  and  housed  rats  of  enormous  size;  the  only  objection  was 
that  the  doors  were  all  on  the  sides  facing  towards  Cxcrmany  and  the 
Boche  artillery  had  the  exact  co-ordinates  of  every  one  of  their  old 
homes.  , 


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Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  After  St.  Mihiel  283 

General  Flagler  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  Major  General 
and  on  October  9th  left  to  take  command  of  the  Third  Corps  Ai'til- 
lery.  He  was  succeeded  by  Brigadier  General  W.  C.  Rivers,  who 
had  conmianded  the  Seventy-sixth  Field  Artillery  of  the  Third  Divi- 
sion. Shortly  afterwards  the  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade,  attached 
to  the  Seventh  Division,  was  included  in  the  Second  American  Army, 
organized  to  hold  the  eastern  portion  of  the  American  front  and 
commanded  by  Lieutenant  General  BuUard. 

"Wild-cat"  guns  were  established  by  the  ])atteries  in  advance  of 
the  positions,  with  the  purpose  of  drawing  the  fire  of  the  Germans 
away  from  the  regular  emplacements.  Wild-cats  carried  out  their 
nightly  harassing  fire  and  when  their  bold  locations  grew  too  hot  to 
remain  longer,  new  ones  were  selected  and  the  Huns  banged  away 
at  deserted  gunpits.  The  two  "Rover"  guns  of  the  first  battalion  of 
the  Twenty-first,  situated  in  Vieville,  too  heavy  to  shift  around  witli 
each  "over  and  short"  from  the  Boche  experienced  thrills  when  sliells 
of  all  sizes  from  77's  clear  up  to  12-inch  G-I  cans  from  the  INIetz  forts 
dropped  on  all  sides  and  even  tore  down  the  camouflage  and  filled  a 
wheel  full  of  steel  splinters  witliout  harming  the  gun.  Evidently  the 
daily  adjustment  by  the  Hun  planes  on  the  old  church  nearby  had 
spotted  the  positions,  but  probable  error  had  saved  the  pieces. 

As  the  American  First  Arm}'  offensive  was  carried  across  the 
Meuse  by  the  Fifth  Division  in  early  November  and  plans  were  being 
consummated  for  a  new  attack  on  the  Briey  region  and  Metz,  the 
divisions  of  the  Second  Army  prepared  to  do  their  part.  The 
Seventli  woidd  have  been  called  ujjon  to  do  little  more  tlian  act  as  a 
hinge  for  the  divisions  to  the  north  and  west,  but  in  the  late  October 
the  batteries  of  the  Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  reconnoitered  and 
moved  into  new  positions  close  to  the  front  lines  whence  they  could 
effectively  support  any  movement  of  the  infantry.  Practically  every 
battery,  both  light  and  heavy,  was  well  ahead  of  the  second  lines. 
Large  numbers  of  additional  batteries  began  to  move  into  the  sector 
and  appearances  indicated  that  a  drive  was  impending.  The  Ger- 
mans seemed  little  suspicious  of  any  threatening  off'ensive.  although 
they  bombarded  the  first  battalion  of  the  Twenty-first  in  its  new 
positions  in  Bois  Gerard  and  lirought  half  a  dozen  casualties. 

The  armistice  stopped  the  contemplated  operation,  although  on 
November  10th  the  Seventh  Division  had  captured  the  hills  near 
Rembercourt  with  twenty-one  prisoners.  Following  tlie  cessation  of 
hostilities  the  whole  Fifth  Brigade  was  engaged  in  policing  the  sector, 
cleaning  up  large  areas  around  the  positions  and  in  the  area  of  the  old 
pre-St.  Mihiel  front  lines. 


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Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  After  St.  Mihiel  285 

The  units  were  reassembled  with  their  echelons  and  preparations 
made  to  rejoin  the  Fifth  Division,  for  which  orders  came  on  Novem- 
ber 30th.  New  horses  had  been  drawn  from  the  Second  Army  to 
replace  those  turned  over  to  the  Third  Ai'my  and  some  new  equip- 
ment issued,  although  there  was  still  considerable  shortage  all  around. 
Regiments  were  united  and  on  December  2nd  the  march  to  Luxem- 
bourg was  begun  in  the  rain.  The  route  lay  through  Chambley,  Con- 
flans,  Briey  and  Aumetz,  and  on  the  5th  and  6th  the  brigade  arrived 
in  southern  Luxembourg — Nineteenth  around  Roeser,  Twentieth 
around  Peppange  and  Twenty-first  in  Dudelange.  As  a  part  of  the 
Third  Army  the  Artillery  Brigade  had  orders  to  move  on  to  the  valley 
of  the  Saar  river  in  Germany,  but  the  Fifth  Division  was  transferred 
to  the  Second  Army  and  the  Artillery  Brigade  settled  itself  in  its 
Luxembourg  billets.  Its  efforts  were  then  directed  to  bringing  the 
Ul-conditioned  horses  into  good  shape  and  to  cleaning  and  overhauling 
material  for  a  possible  movement  into  Germany.  On  December  1.5th 
the  Fifth  Trench  Mortar  Battery  was  detached  and  moved  back  to 
the  S.  O.  S.  to  retiu'n  to  the  States. 

The  casualties  of  the  Brigade,  in  this  quiet  sector  while  the  in- 
fantry of  the  Fifth  Division  was  fighting  so  hard  in  the  Meuse- 
Argonne  battles,  were  light.  One  officer  of  the  brigade  died  of 
wounds,  four  were  wounded  and  six  gassed.  Among  enlisted  men  49 
were  killed  and  died  of  wounds,  93  were  wounded  and  30  were  gassed. 
There  were  no  men  captured  and  none  reported  missing. 


5. 


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Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade  After  St.  Mihiel 


287 


ENLISTED  MEN  KILLED  IN  ACTION 
AFTER  ST.  MIHIEL  OPERATION 


NINETEENTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


*Sad.  Frank  Protono,  Sup.  Co. 
*Wag.  Charles  C.  Stanley,  Sup.  Co. 
*Pfc.  George  B.  Bridges,  Btry.  B. 
•Pvt.  Walter  K.  Capp,  Btry.  B. 
•Pvt.  John  W.  Howerton,  Btry.  B. 
•Corp.  Charles  McGraw,  Btry.  B. 
*Pvt.  Harley  F.  Maxson,  Btry.  B. 

Pfc.  George  A.  Perry,  Btry.  B. 

Corp.  Roy  Ray,  Btry.  B. 
•Pvt.  John  V.  Reilly,"  Btry.  B. 
•Sgt.  Enii!  Von  Sprecken,  Btry.  B. 
•Pfc.  Vincent  Wyszynski,  Btry.  B. 

Pvt.  Harry  E.  Shuff,  Btry.  C. 

Sgt.  John  J.  Tittler,  Btry.  C. 
•Pvt.  Duane  D.  Drake,  Btry.  D. 

Pfc.  Joseph  Drew,  Btry.  D. 


•Corp.  Loui.s  F.  Enders,  Btry.  D. 

Corp.  Edward  A.  Gamache,  Btry.  D. 

Sgt.  Edward  F.  Gries,  Btry.  D. 
•Pfc.  Carl  A.  Han.son,  Btry.  D. 

Pfc.  John  KroU,  Btry.  D." 

Sgt.  Walter  A.  Monath,  Btry.  D. 
•Pvt.  George  R.  Morris,  Btry.  D. 

Pfc.  John   Noom,  Btry.   D. 

Pfc.  Edward    U.    Proctor,   Btry.   D. 

Pvt.  George  Ross,  Btry.  D. 

Pfc.  John  J.  Wargo,  Btry.  D. 

Mech.  John  J.  Wolpert,  Btry.  D. 

Pvt.  Guy  E.  Eckle,  Btry.  E. 
•Sgt.  Thomas  Rcnwick,  I5try.  E. 

Pfc.  James  T.  Tansey,  Btry.  F. 

Pfc.  Charles  E.  Wagoner,  Btry.  F. 


TWENTIETH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


Pvt.  Robert  B.  HufiFman,  Hq.  Co. 
Pvt.  Ephraim  Johnson,  Hq.  Co. 
Pvt.  Samuel  Aluzzo,  Btry.  A. 
Sgt.  John   Perelli,  Btry.  A. 
Pvt.  Andrew  J.  CoUins,  Btry.  B. 


Pvt.  Holden  S.  Corey,  Btry.  B. 

Pvt.  Isaac  M.  Giles,  Btry.  B. 

Pfc.  James  J.  Peltier,  Btry.  B. 
•Corp.  Hosie  Smith,  Btry.   B. 
•Cook  Reubin  J.  Watson,  Btry.  E. 


TWENTY-FIRST  FIELD  ARTILLERY 


•Pvt.  Edmund  G.  Baca,  Hq.  Co. 
Pvt.  Robert  R.  Sater,  Med.  Det. 
Pfc.  Charles  A.  Ford,  Btry.  A. 


Pvt.  John  Morgan,  Btry.  E. 


Pvt.  Adolph  Przywarski,  Btry.  A. 
Pvt.  Joseph    Carignan,    Btry.    D. 
Pvt.  George  E.  Dick,  Btry.E. 


(•)  Died  of  wounds. 


288  History  of  the  Fifth  Divimm 


BATTALION   AND   HIGHER   COMMANDERS   IN    FIFTH   FIELD 

ARTILLERY   BRIGADE    DURING   OCCUPATION   OF 

ST.  MIHIEL  SECTOR 

Brigadier  General  Clement  A.  F.  Flagler.  Commanding  lirigade  to  October  9th. 

Brigadier  General  W.  C.  Rivers,  Commanding  brigade  from  (lotober  14th. 

First  Lieutenant  Lewis  J.  Bruner,  Aide  de  Camp. 

First  Lieutenant  Frederick  C.  Bellinger,  /\lde  de  Camp. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  John  Magruder,  Brigade  .Adjutant  to  October  2fith. 

Captain  William  Cowgill,  Brigade  Adjutant  from  Octolier  27th. 

NINETEENTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Lieutenant  Colonel  C.  P.  HoUingsworth,  Commanding  regiment  to  October  12th. 

Lieutenant  Colonel   William  E.   Dunn,  Commanding  regiment  October   13th  to  November  2nd. 

Colonel  Louis  H.  McKinlay,  Commanding  regiment  from  November  3rd. 

Major  John  S.  MacTaggart,  Commanding  first  battalion. 

Major  Walter  F.  Winton,  Commanding  .second  battalion  to  October  17th. 

Captain  Wallace  B.  Russell,  Commanding  .second  Ijattalion  from  Octolier  18tli. 

TWENTIETH  FIELD  .VUTll.LERY 

Colonel  Brook  Payne,  Commanding  regiment. 
Major  Cuyler  L.  Clark,  Commanding  first  battalion. 
Major  George  L.  Miller,  Commanding  second  battalion. 

TWENTY-FIRST  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonel  Richard  McMaster,  Commanding  regiment. 

Lieutenant  Colonel  George  A.  Seaman,  Commanding  first  battalion  to  October  7th. 

Major  Julius  T.  A.  Doolittle,  Commanding  first  battalion  from  October  8th. 

Major  Jean  A.  Jeancon,  Commanding  second  battalion. 

Major  George  S.  Gay,  Commanding  third  liattalion  to  Se]>temlicr  27th. 

Major  George  J.  Downing,  Commanding  third  battalion  from  September  28th. 


Fifth  Field  Artillen/  Brigade  After  St.  3Iihiel 


289 


FIFTH   F.   A.   BRIGADE,  SEPTEMBER    18   TO   NOVEMBER    11,    1918 

OFFICEUS 

Organizatiok                                                 KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

Nineteenth     Field     Artillery 1  4  0  5 

Twentieth    Field    Artillery 0  0  5  5 

Twenty-first   Field   Artillery 0  0  11 

Total 1  4  6  11 

ENLISTED 

Organizatios                                                KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

Nineteenth  Field  Artillery 32  34  7  75 

Twentieth    Field    Artillery 10  26  21  57 

Twenty-first   Field   Artillery 7  33  2  42 

Total 49  93  30  172 

SUMMARY 

KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

Officers     1  4  6  11 

Enlisted     49  93  30  172 

Total 50  97  36  183 


PART   III 
APPENDIX 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  293 

SECRET 
FIELD  ORDER,  ^^^  Division, 

No.  41.  •  9   Sept.,    18. 

12  Hours. 

Map.s:    COMMERCY— 1:80,000. 
BOIS  DE  PRETE ) 
CHAMBLEY  {  l--20,000. 

I.      (a)   GENERAL  OBJECT  OF  THE  OFFENSIVE: 
The  reduction  of  the  ST.  MIHIEL  SALIENT. 

(1.)   MISSION  AND  ZONE  OF  THE  1ST  ARMY  CORPS:    (See  map  attached  ) 

Ihe  1st  Army  Corps  will  attack  between  LIMEY  (inclusive)  and  BOIS  DE  PRETE 
(exclusive),  and  will  hold  on  the  remainder  of  the  Corps  front. 

5th  Aivisln':  '"^*''  ^'"'"""  '''"  '"""■"■''  ""  "'''  "^''*  "^'  ^"'^  *''•=  -"''  Division  on  the  left  of  the 

(d)  OBJECTIVES  OF  THE  1ST  ARMY  CORPS: 
There  will  be  two  successive  attacks: 

1st  Attack:     1st  Day: 

Intermediate    Objective Red  Line 

1st   Phase   Oljjective '.'.'  Hiue  Line. 

2nd  Attack:     1st  Day: 

1st   Day's    Objective Brown  Line. 

Pos.sibIe    Objective Yellow  Line. 

2nd  Day's  Attack: 

Army    Objective Yellow  Line. 

II.    GENERAL    PLAN: 

(a)   The  5th  Division  will  attack  on  D  day  at  H  liour. 

(h)   Zone  of  action  of  tlic  5tli  Division  (see  maj)  attached): 

RAVINE  l^Fyss^a''';M''n^'■^•*^'"c^^^^^^  335-»   (t°  Sf'  Division)- 

DES  o  B(US   fto  .H    TV  f '^-7)-STRKAM  DE  LA  TREY  (to  OOtl,  Division)-TR 

IJEb  -   BOIS    (to  5th  Division)— road  cut  400  m.   east  of  VIEVILLE-EN-H  \YE    rto   OMh 
Division) -BOIS  DU  TROU  DE  LA  HAIE  (to  5th  Division).  ^ 

Left  (west)  limit:  REMENAUVILLE  (to  2nd  Division) -BOIS  DU  FOUR  (to  2nd 
30l77^~^?\%  ''''''^'''^^J"'  '"'  Division)-Po/„.  S07j\to  5th  Di^siT^i  ™S 
2nd  Division')   ^'"''"""^-^^^^  ^^  BONVAUX   (to  5th  Division)-REMBERCOURT    (to 

Ivin  ^''\^^!'-^lf'-^'  ^'•''  t''°^^  PO'-tion-'^  "f  the  Corps  Objectives    (designated   in   1    (d)    above) 
lying  withm  the  zone  of  action  of  the  5tb  Division,  as  follows:  i     ;    a    jve;. 

1st  Day: 

1st  Attack. 
Intermediate  Objective   (Red   Line): 

(100   meters   north   of   TR    DES   2    BOIS-Xorth    edge   of    BOIS    DES    SAULX  ) 
1st  Phase  Objective  (Blue  Line):  ' 

nf  nm^'r^T^Z^^  wood  1,000  meters  northeast  <,f  \-IEVILLE-EN-HAYE-Nortbern  edge 
of  BOIS  GERARD  and  of  BOIS  D'HEICHE).  ^ 

2nd  Attack. 
1st  Day  Objective  (Brown  Line): 

(We.st  corner  of  wood  1,000  meters  northeast  of  VIEVILLE-EN-HAYE— Northeast  cor 
::L1.  '  GERARD-Point  312.3-towards  JAULNY  to  the  west  limft  ofthe  Divi'on 


294  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

(d)  INITIAL  DISPOSITION  FOR  THE  ATTACK: 

The  Infantry  will  attack  in  column  of  brigades,  the  leading  briga<le  in  line  of  regimental 
columns,  each  regiment  with  one  battalion  in  the  first  line. 

(e)  GENERAL  DIRECTION  OF  THE  ATTACK: 
VIEVILLE-EN-HAYE   (compass  bearing  of  direction  of  attack:  due  magnetic  north). 

(f)  1.  The  leading  battalions,  following  the  rolling  barrage  as  closely  as  possible,  will 
leave  the  departure  trenches  at  H  hour. 

2.  The  attack  up  to  the  1st  Intermediate  Objective  will  be  carried  out  by  the  first  line  bat- 
talions. Tlie  first  line  battalions  will  Iialt  on  this  objective,  where  the  second  line  (support) 
battalions  will  pass  througli  them  and  carry  out  the  attack  on  the  1st  Phase  Line  (Blue  Line) 
and  tlie  Jst  Day's  Objective  (Brown  Line). 

3.  In  all  cases  when  a  battalion  has  attained  its  oljjective,  it  will  at  once  reform  and 
take  up  tlie  organization  of  the  ground  for  defense  in  depth,  and  the  police  of  the  battlefield. 

4.  Upon  reaching  the  First  Day  Olijective,  strong  reconnaissance  patrols  of  infantry  and 
machine  guns  under  the  protection  of  tlie  forward  guns  and  liglit  tanks  will  be  pushed  forward 
toward  the  Exploitation  Line  (Black  Line),  to  gain  and  hold  ground  for  the  establishment  of 
the  Zone  of  Advanced  Posts  and  insure  the  organization  in  depth  of  the  Yellow  Line  as  the 
main  line  of  resistance  to  be  definitely  held.  This  general  line  of  advance  Posts  will  be 
LA  SOULEUVRE  FARM— REMBERCOURT. 

III.     GENERAL  INSTRUCTIONS: 

(a)  1.  The  10th  Brigade  will  be  the  leading  brigade. 
Attached  troops: 

1  Bn.  20th  Field  Artillery, 

2  coini)anies,  7lh  Engineers, 
12  medium  tanks, 

2  companies  light  tanks   (30  tanks), 

Gas  and  Flame  Troojis   (see  Annex  No.  10). 

2.  Boundaries  of  its  zone  of  action  are  tho.se  of  the  Division. 

3.  Its  objectives  are  those  portions  of  the  Corps  Ohjcctiv<-s  lying  within  its  zone  of  action. 

(b)  The  Divisional  reserve  will  consist  of  the  9tli  Brigade  (less  11th  M.  G.  Bn.),  and  1 
company  of  light  tanks. 

First  Position:  South  of  Y  co-ordinate  233,  one  regiment  on  each  side  of  the  T.  JACQUES 
road.     Position  of  tanks  to  be  designated  later. 

Movements:   As  directed  by  the  Division  Couuuander. 

(c)  Machine  Guns: 

Tlie  13th  and  Ilth  Machine  Gun  Battalions,  under  the  command  of  the  Division  Machine 
Gun  Officer,  will  be  used  for  long  range  overhead  and  indirect  fire  [see  annex  to  par. 
Ill   (c)J. 

(d)  1.  The  attack  will  begin  at  D  day  at  H  hour. 

2.  Parallels  of  departure— TRENCHEE  DE  LA  MARNE— BOYOU  DE  LIAISON 
(see  map  attached). 

3.  Time  Table: 

At  H  hour — Start  from  the  parallel  of  departure. 

At  II  plus  110  minutes,  leave  the  Intermediate  Objective. 

At  H  plus  6  hours,  leave  the  fir.st  Phase  Objective. 

4.  The  speed  of  the  attack  will  be  100  meters  in  four  minutes  to  include  the  Intermediate 
Objective.  Between  the  Intermediate  Objective  and  the  first  Day  Line,  the  advance  will  be 
100  meters  in  four  minutes,  and  without  regard  to  the  movements  of  the  divisions  on  the  right 
and  left. 

(e)  DETAILED  ORDERS  FOR  UNITS: 

1.  Special  units  taken  from  rear  companies  or  battalions  will  be  assigned  the  mission  of 
mopping  up.  These  mopping  up  detachments  should  join  their  organizations  as  soon  as  the 
latter  arrive  abreast  of  them. 

2.  Penetration  will  be  sought  by  utilizing  lanes  of  least  resistance  in  order  to  cause  the 
fall  of  strong  points  by  outflanking. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  295 

3.  One  battalion,  20th  Field  Artillery,  is  placed  under  orders  of  the  Coiiiniiindni^  General, 
10th  Brigade,  at  D  minus  2  days.  It  will  be  used  as  Infantry  IjufUries  and  furicanl  yuns  to 
assist  the  infantry  and  tanks  in  their  forward  progress. 

4.  All  troops  must  be  in  position  on  D  day  at  H  minus  -1  hours. 

5.  All  machine  guns  will  be  equipped  for  anti-aircraft  firing. 

(f)  ARTILLERY: 

See  annex  to  paragraph  3   (f). 

1.  The  rolling  and  standing  liarrages  will  be  governed  by  the  time  table  pre.scribed  in 
par.  Ill  (d)  3.  It  will  advance  uniformly  200  yards  in  advance  of  the  infantry  at  the  rate  of 
100  meters  in  I  minutes  u])  to  the  Intermediate  Objective,  where  it  will  rest  until  H  plus  110 
minutes.  It  will  then  continue  at  the  same  rate  as  before  up  to  the  first  Phase  Objective, 
where  it  will  rest  until  H  ]ilus  (i  hours,  and  then  continue  at  the  former  rate  200  meters  beyond 
the  first  Day  01)jective,  where  It  will  rest. 

2.  Infantry  battalion  commanders  will  give  necessary  orders  for  the  .support  of  the 
expoiting  patrols  mentioned  in  jiaragraph  II   (f)    I-. 

3.  Artillery  action  will  begin  at  H  hour. 

4.  Objectives  to  be  fired  on  of  the  first  importance; 

Trenches  in  the  BOIS  DES  SAULX,  BOIS  DES  GRANDES  PORTIONS  and  BOIS 
ST.  CLAUDE. 

Zone  of  dugouts: 

QUELLENLAGER   (both  in  BOIS  DL'  FOUR  and   V.M.LEY  DE  LA  TREY). 

S.\IX\V,\LDLAGER   (in  BOIS  DES  S.Vl'l.X,   Anti-tank    guns   ncMr   the    UECIN'IE- 
VILLE-THIACOURT  road   (Fire  and  smoke). 

Interdictions: 

Particular  attention  to  all  the  routes  leading  to  BOIS  DES  SAULX,  BOIS  DES 
GRANDE  PORTIONS,  BOIS  ST.  CLAUDE,  RAVINE  L.\  FOSSE,  northwest  of  VIE- 
VILLE,  and  communicating  routes  leading  southwest  from   LA   SOULEUYRE   FERME. 

(g)  AIR  SERVICE: 

See  Annex  to  paragraph  III   (g). 

To  the  5th  Division  are  attached  the  following  units: 

12  .\ero  Squadron, 

Balloon  Company  No.  2. 

(h)  ENGINEERS: 

See  Annex  to  paragraph  3  (h). 

(i)    GAS  .VND  FLAME  TROOPS: 

See  Annex  to  paragraph  3  (i). 

(k)  TANKS: 

See  Annex  to  jiaragraph  3   (k). 
To  the  .5th  Division  are  attached: 
12  medium  tanks, 
3  companies  of  light  tanks   (each  company   of  3  sections,  of  5  tanks  each). 

IV.    COMMUNICATION,  SUPPLY  AND  EVACUATION: 
See  Annex  to  paragraph  IV. 

V.    (a)   LIAISON: 

See  Annex  to  paragraph  V   (a). 
(b)   Combat  Liaison. 

1.  A  thorough  combat  connection  is  to  I)e  maint.iined  with  neighboring  units.  This  will 
be  carried  out  by  special  liaison  detachments,  advancing  by  echelon  in  a  succession  of 
bounds  along  the  Division  boundary  lines,  in   principle  keeping  abreast  of  the  support  com- 


296  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

panics  of  the  leading  battalions.  Within  the  Division  each  unit  will  maintain  liaison  between 
its  elements  antl  witli  the  unit  on  its  left.  Liaison  with  the  90th  Division  will  be  secured  by  a 
liaison  detachment  consisting  of  two  platoons  of  infantry  and  one  platoon  of  machine  guns. 
Liaison  with  the  2nd  Division  will  be  secured  by  a  detachment  consisting  of  two  companies 
of  infantry  and  one  platoon,  machine  guns.  (2  companies,  infantry,  for  the  left  liaison 
detachment  will  be  furnished  by  the  9th  Brigade,  to  be  at  the  disposition  of  the  C.  O.  10th 
Brigade  from  D-1  Day.) 

2.  Liaison  between  the  attacking  regiments  will  be  secured  by  detachments  of  one  platoon 
of  infantry  and  one  section,  machine  guns,  advancmg  along  the  regimental  boundary  line  in 
the  manner  described  above. 

(c)  AXIS  OF  LIAISON: 

See  Annex  No.  8. 

(d)  ADVANCE  REPORT  CENTER: 

Junction  of  the  ST.  JACQUES  road  witli  the  METZ  highway. 

(e)  COMMAND  POSTS: 

5th  Division— ST.  JACQUES. 

Artillery  Commander— ST.  JACQUES. 

10th  Brigade— BOIS  DE  HACQUEMOXT  (co-ordinate  G76  X  336)  up  to  the 
capture  of  the  1st  Phase  Objective.  After  the  capture  of  the  1st  Phase 
Objective  to  BOIS  DES  GRANDES  PORTIONS  (near  co-ordinate 
671  X  378). 

9th  Brigade:   To  be  given  later. 

^  Jno.  E.  McMahon, 

Major  General. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  297 

5th   Division, 
mil  October,  1918. 
8:30  hours. 
SECRET 

FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  54. 


Maps:  VERDUN  "A"— 1 :20,000. 
A'ERDUN  "B"— 1:20,000. 
MONFTFAUCON— 1 :50,000. 

1.  Tlie  3rd  Corps  holds  the  front  approximately  east  and  west  on  the  CUNEL- 
BllIEULLES  road.    The  1st  Army  resumed  its  attacks  this  morning. 

2.  This  division  will  relieve  the  80th  Division  on  the  night  11/12  October,  relief  to  be 
completed  by  6  hours  (6  A.  M.)  12th  October. 

Limits  of  Divisional  sector  are: 

On  the  east:  Point  11.4-86.3  to  13.6-86.0  to  13.0-81.7  to  12.0-84.4  to  12.0-83.0  to 
12.6-82.0  to  13.0-80.3— SEPTS  A  RGES  (inclusive)— CUISY  (exclusive)— MALAN- 
COURT  (inclusive). 

On  the  west:   B.\NTHEVILLE— CUNEI.— road  fork  (about  800  meters  west  of 
•  NANTILLOIS    road     (inclusive)— FA  YEL    Farm     (inclusive)— MONTFAUCON— 
AVOCOURT  road  (inclu.sive). 

3.  (a)  The  9th  Brigade  will  hold  the  sector,  and  will  be  disposed  as  follows: 

(b)  Two  battalions  on  outpost  line,  relieving  two  battalions  of  the  80th  Division  and  cer- 
tain elements  of  the  4th  Division  now  in  the  sector. 

(c)  Two  battalions  on  the  high  ground  east  of  the  Fme.  de  la  MADELEINE,  relieving 
two  battalions  of  the  80th  Division. 

(d)  Two  battalions  on  the  line  east  and  west  through  NANTILLOIS,  relieving  one  bat- 
talion of  the  80th  Division  in  that  vicinity. 

(e)  The  10th  Brigade,  as  divisional  reserve,  will  place  two  battalions  on  the  general 
line  east  of  MONTFAUCON  in  the  divisional  sector.  The  remaining  four  battalions  in  the 
BOIS  DE  CUISY  east  of  the  MONTFAUCON-AVOCOURT  road. 

(f)  The  13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion  will  move  into  the  Bois  de  Cuisy,  near  the  troops 
of  tlie  10th  Brigade,  march  not  to  begin  before  17:30  hours  (5:30  P.  M.). 

(g)  The  9th  Field  Signal  Battalion,  less  detached  elements,  will  occupy  available  dugouts 
in  the  vicinity  of  the  Division  P.  C. 

(h)  Trains  and  Sanitary  units  will  be  disposed  under  the  direction  of  G-1. 

(i)  Reports,  with  sketches,  showing  exact  location  of  all  units  will  be  submitted  to  these 
headquarters  as  soon  as  units  are  established. 

(j)  The  division  wiU  be  supported  by  the  artillery  of  the  80th  Division. 

4.  Movement  of  foot  troops  between  present  camp  in  the  BOIS  DE  HESSE  and  northern 
edge  of  BOIS  DE  CUISY,  will  be  accomplished  in  daylight.  Movements  north  of  the  BOIS 
DE  CUISY  will  be  by  night. 

Transport  will  march  at  18  hours  (6  P.  M.)  via  the  MONTZEVILLE-ESNES-MALAN- 
COURT  road. 

Command  of  Brigade  and  Regimental  sectors  wiU  pass  to  Brigade  and  Regimental  Com- 
manders on  completion  of  front  line  relief. 


298  Histonj  of  the  Fifth   Division 

5.    (m)   ('(iriiiriMiul  of  the  Divisional  sector  will  jjuss  lo  the  t'oMiiiiHiKlin}:  (n'm-r-al.  ')tli  Divi- 
sion, at  ()  hours  ((i.dO  A.  M.),  Tith  October. 

P.  C.     Oth  Brigade— Eastern  edge  of  XANTILl.OIS. 
P.  C.  10th  Brigade— BOIS  DE  CUISY. 

Division  headquarters  will  close  at  BLERCOUHT  at   IH  hours   ((i.OD  I'.  M.).   Hth  October, 
and  open  near  cross-roads  al)out  1  kilometer  southeast  of  FAYEL  Farm,  same  date  and  hour. 

{!))   Connnanders  relieved  will  turn  over  maps,  photos,  .irchrs,  etc..  wliich   pertain  to  their 
.sectors. 

(<■)    Liaison  will  be  established  with  troops  on  both  llaiiUs. 

By  command  of  Major  General  McMahon. 

C.  A.  Tboit, 

Chief   of    Staff. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division 


299 


Maps:    DL'N-SrU-MEUSE) 

VERDIX  "A"  i  • 


P.  C.  5th  Division,  A.  E.  F., 
13th  October,  1!)18. 
16  H. 


FIELD  ORDER, 
No.  55. 

TROOPS: 


Attiirkhut  Troops 
10th  BrijratU-: 

13th   Macliine  Cliin   Battalion. 
1   Battalion,  7th  Enjrinerrs. 
Company  A,  1st  Gas   Rtjrinicnt. 
Batti-ryF,  311th   Fit-Id   Artillery    (acconi- 

jianyinp  liaftcry). 
Artillery. 

!»th    Brifiadr: 

155tli   Field  Artillery  Bripade. 

Hh  Field  Artillery  Bripade  (less  one  regi- 
ment 75s  and  one  hattalion  155s). 

3rd  Field  .\rtillcry  Brigade  (less  ene 
regiment  7.5.s). 

45(i  R.  A.  L. 

250  R.  A.  C.  P. 

l/t.5t  R.  A.   I,. 

1/330  R.  A.   I,. 

1/301   R.   A.   I,. 

1    .\ir  Squadron. 

1    Balloon   Company. 


Re  erve: 

.i.Hth   Infantry. 

"2  Com])anies,  7tli   Enpinei 


1.  (a)   The  allied  armies  to  our  left  are 
meeting  with  eontinned  success. 

(h)  The  1st  -Vmerican  Army,  less  the 
17th  French  Corps,  will  hold  its  present  po- 
sition today  and  will  attack  on  October 
1  tth.  The  17th  Corps  French  continues  its 
attack  on  October  13th. 

(c)  The  3rd  Corps  will  attack  on  Octo- 
ber nth  at  H  hour  with  its  main  attack 
ahmg  the  line  BOIS  DE  CCXEL— 
B.WTHEVILE— GRAND  CARRE  Fme., 
while  the  Sth  Corps  attacks  with  one  divi- 
sion west  of  BOIS  DE  ROMANGE  and 
BOIS  DE  BAXTIIEN'II.LE,  the  two  corps 
jointly  cajituring  llie  high  ground  north  of 
the  BOIS  DF  B.\XTHFVII.EE  and  the 
intervening  ground  being  cleaned  up  prin- 
cipally by  other  troojjs  of  the  5th  Corps. 
The  3rd  division  will  be  in  support,  hold- 
ing its  present  fnnt  line,  and  at  H  hour 
will  advance  to  and  hold  the  line,  southeast 
edge  of  the  BOIS  DE  LA  PIT.TIERE— 
BOIS  CLAIRS  CHENES— DERRIERE 
DE  LA  COTE  DE  FORET,  then  south  to 
east  edge  of  the  BOIS  DE  PEL'T  DE 
FAUX.  The  32nd  Division  on  our  left  will 
attack  in  the  direction  of  ROMAGN'E- 
SOUS-MON'TFAl'CON  and  REMOI- 
VILLE.  The  +th  Division,  less  artillery 
and  one  infantry  regiment,  will  be  the  corps 
reserve.  The  58th  Infantry  is  placed  at  the 
disposal  of  the  division   as  division   reserve. 

2.  (a)  This  division  will  attack  on  Octo- 
ber l+th  at  H  hour,  with  its  main  attack 
along  the  line  BOIS  DE  CUNEI>— 
B.WTHEVILLE— GRAND  CARRE  Fme. 
— and  at  the  same  time  cleaning  up  the  BOIS 
DE  LA  PULTIERE— BOIS  DES  RAP- 
PES,  and  occupying  the  general  line,  north- 
ern edge  of  CL.URS  CHENES— AINCRE- 
VILLE  Fme.  de  CHASSOGNE— high 
ground  BOIS  ANDEV,\XXE  and  make  a 
junction  with  the  12nd  Division  on  the  high 
ground  north  of  BOIS  DE  BANTHE- 
VILLE,  which  latter  division  will  attack 
west  of  BOIS  DK  ROMAGNE  and  BOIS 
DE  BAXTHEVILLE.  The  intervening 
ground  will  be  cleared  up  j)rincipally  by 
troops  of  the  5th  Corps. 


300  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

(b)  MISSIONS  OF  THIS  DIVISION:  (1)  To  drive  one  brigade  through  to  the 
GRAND  CARRE  FME.  and  high  ground  one  kilometer  north  and  northwest  of  it.  (2)  To 
assist  the  5th  Corps  in  reducing  the  BOIS  DE  BANTHEVILLE.  (3)  To  clean  up  the  BOIS 
DE  LA  PULTIERE,  BOIS  DES  RAPPES  and  CLAIRS  CHENES. 

(c)  ZONES  OF  ACTION.  Right  boundary  of  division:  Western  edge  of  wood  one-half 
kilometer  east  of  CUNEL,  eastern  edge  of  BOIS  DE  LA  PULTIERE  (exc),  east  edge  of 
CLAIRS  CHENES  (exc).  15.76,  cross-road  22.92,  la  JONQUETTE.  Left  boundary  of  divi- 
sion: MALANCOURT  (inc.)— MONTFAUCON  (exc.)  center  of  the  BOIS  DE  BEUGE— 
BOIS  DE  CUNEL  (inc.)— Fme.  de  LAWOUIS  (one-half  kilometer  northeast  of  BOIS 
L'ANDEVANNE   (inc.)— REMONVILLE  (exc). 

3.  (a)  This  division  will  attack  between  the  woods  one-half  kilometer  east  of  CUNEL 
exc),  BOIS  DE  LA  PULTIERE  (inc),  the  CLAIRS  CHENES  (inc)  and  ROMANCE 
SOUS  MONTFAUCON— BOIS  DE  BANTHEVILLE  along  the  axial  line  BOIS  DE 
CUNEI.— BANTHEVILLE— LA  GRAND  CARRE  FME.— BOIS  D'ANDEVANNE.  The 
attack  will  pass  through  the  front  line  held  by  the  supporting  division  between  the  woods  one- 
half  kilometer  east  of  CUNEL  and  ROMAGNE  SOUS  MONTFAUCON.  The  10th  Brigade 
will  drive  through  to  LE  GRAND  CARRE  FME.— BOIS  D'ANDEVANNE.  The  attack 
will  pass  through  the  front  line  held  hy  the  .supporting  division  between  the  woods  one-half 
kilometer  east  of  CUNEL  and  ROMAGNE  SOUS  MONTFAUCON.  The  10th  Brigade  will 
drive  through  to  I>E  GRAND  CARRE  FME.  and  high  ground  one  kilometer  north  and 
northwest  of  it,  which  it  will  hold  and  organize,  and  where  it  will  gain  contact  with  the  42nd 
Division,  which  attacks  from  the  north  of  SOMERANCE.  One  regiment  of  the  9th  Brigade 
will  attack  through  the  BOIS  DE  LA  PULTIERE,  BOIS  DES  RAPPES  and  CLAIRS 
CHENES  to  the  northern  edge  of  these  woods,  where  it  will  organize  and  exploit  to  the 
ceneral  line  15.76— AINCREVILLE.  The  troops  mentioned  will  follow  a  deep  rolling 
barrage  at  the  rate  of  100  meters  in  five  minutes  and  will  make  their  progress  without  stop  to 
the  objectives  above  given,  passing  lines  (where  necessary)  without  halting.  The  remaining 
regiment  of  the  9th  Brigade  will  follow  the  right  regiment  of  the  10th  Brigade,  and,  after 
crossing  the  L'ANDON  RAU,  will  occupy  and  organize  the  high  ground  from  .'\INCRE- 
VILLE  to  one  kilometer  southeast  of  ANDEVANNE.  The  10th  Brigade  will  attack,  with 
regiments  side  by  side,  each  regiment  in  column  of  battalions.  The  regiment  of  the  9th 
Brigade,  attacking  through  the  BOIS  DE  LA  PULTIERE,  will  attack  on  a  front  of  one 
battalion.  The  regiment  of  the  9th  Brigade  which  follows  the  right  regiment  of  the  10th 
Brigade  will  be  in  column  of  battalions.  Distance  between  battalions  will  be  about  300 
meters.  The  parallel  of  departure  for  the  attack  will  be  a  general  east  and  west  line  200 
meters  south  of  the  road  ROMAGNE  SOUS  MONTFAUCON— CUNEL  and  extending  east- 
ward to  the  western  edge  of  the  wood  one-half  kilometer  east  of  CUNEL. 

(b)  13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion  is  assigned  to  the  10th  Brigade  for  this  attack. 

(c)  One  battalion  of  engineers  will  accompany  the  10th  Brigade  and  assist  this  brigade 
as  well  as  one  regiment  of  the  9th  Brigade  in  crossing  L'ANDON  RAU  by  bridging.  The 
necessary  foot  bridges  will  be  constructed  prior  to  the  action,  and  will  be  carried  by  the  engi- 
neers. For  this  purpose  the  battalion  is  placed  under  the  command  of  the  10th  Brigade. 
Upon  completion  of  this  duty  the  engineers  will  at  once  proceed  to  construct  two  permanent 
bridges  at  BANTHEVILLE  across  this  brook  in  the  event  that  the  bridges  there  have  been 
destroyed. 

(d)  Company  A,  1st  Gas  Regiment,  will  place  ten  mortars  and  their  personnel  at  the 
disposal  of  the  10th  Brigade,  and  six  mortars  and  their  personnel  at  the  disposal  of  the  9th 
Brigade  for  the  attack. 

(e)  The  58th  Infantry  and  two  companies  7th  Engineers  will  constitute  the  reserve  for  the 
division  and  will  take  position  in  the  BOIS  DE  BEUGE. 

(f)  AIR  SERVICE.    See  plan  for  u.se  of  air  service.  Annex  No.  1. 

(g)  (1)  The  rolling  barrage  will  be  at  the  rate  of  100  meters  in  5  minutes,  and  will  have 
a  depth  of  60O  to  700  meters.  (2)  The  artillery  of  this  division,  in  addition  to  laying  a  deep 
rolling  barrage  for  the  advance,  will  (a)  place  heavy  destructive  fire  on  CUNEI>,  BOIS  DE 
LA  PULTIERE,  BOIS  DES  RAPPES  and  CLAIRS  CHENES,  and  other  important 
points;  (2)  counter  battery  enemy  artillery  in  case  corps  artillery  assistance  cannot  be 
obtained  in  time.  (3)  Destructive  shoot  will  commence  at  H  minus  two  hours.  (4)  Division 
and  corps  artillery  commanders  will  utilize  to  the  fullest  extent  possible  the  advantages  of 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  301 

lethal  gas  in  preparing  for  and  assisting  the  infantry  attack  and  in  causing  casualties  in  the 
rear  areas  and  along  the  lines  of  communication.  The  southeastern  and  southwestern  borders 
of  the  BOIS  DE  LA  PULTIERE  and  the  western  border  of  the  BOIS  DES  RAPPES  will 
be  gassed  to  a  depth  of  300  meters  from  H  minus  3  hours  to  H  minus  2  hours.  BOIS  DE 
CLAIRS  CHENES  will  also  be  gassed  from  H  minus  3  hours  to  H  minus  2  hours. 

X.   (1)  Mamimum  use  must  be  made  of  gas  units,  suitably  placed  with  forward  lines. 

(2)  The  37  mm.  gun  must  be  employed  with  first  line  battalion  for  their  legitimate 
mission. 

(3)  One  battery  of  75s,  to  be  designated  by  the  artillery  commander,  will  be  assigned  to 
the  10th  Brigade  as  accompanying  guns.  This  must  be  well  forward  to  assist  instantly  in  the 
reduction  of  machine  gun  nests  or  against  other  suitable  targets. 

(4)  Front  line  must  not  stop  to  clean  up.  The  necessary  mopping  up  parties  wUl  be 
designated  from  C  battalions. 

(5)  One  machine  gun  company  will  accompany  each  battalion. 
(6),  Combat  liaison  as  heretofore. 

4.  PLAN  OF  SUPPLY,  the  evacuation  of  prisons,  etc.,  labor. 

5.  (a)   For  Plan  of  Liaison,  see  Annex  No.  2. 

(b)  Axis  of  liaison  SEPTSARGES— NANTILLOIS— CUNEL— BANTHEVILLE. 

(c)  Advance  Centers  of  Information— NANTILLOIS— FME.  DE  LA  MADELEINE— 
BANTHEVILLE. 

(d)  Brigade  and  regimental  commanders  will  place  their  P.C.'s  at  points  affording  the 
maximum  view  of  the  ground  over  which  their  units  operate. 

(e)  P.C.  of  division  unchanged. 

Jno.  E.  McMahon, 
Major  General, 
Commanding. 


302  History  of  the  Fifth  Divis-ion 

p.  C.  5th  Division, 
2G  Ootoher,  1918. 
17  Hours. 
FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  ()3. 

Maps:    Dl'N-SKR-MEUSE— 1:20,000. 

BUZAXC'Y  Sl'ECI.M.— 1  :.50,oo(). 

1.  (a)  'J'lif  1st  .\incrican  Aniiy,  wliile  farryiiifr  on  its  operation  east  of  the  MEUSE, 
will  continue  tlie  attaek  on  tlie  front  west  of  tlie  MEl'SE.  The  heights  of  HARRICOURT 
will  he  carried  and  junction  with  the  IV  French  .\rniy  gained  near  BOULT  AUX  BOIS. 

(h)  The  3rd  Corps  will  hold  on  that  portion  of  its  front  from  2  kilometers  west  of 
VILOSNES  (1(>.0-Nt.2)— along  the  MEl'SE  River  ea.stern  edge  BOI  DE  FORET— Hill  281 
to  CLAIRS  CHENES  (inc.)  and  will  attack  on  that  portion  of  its  front  from  the  BOIS  DES 
R.VPPES  to  the  western  boundary  of  the  Corps.     'I'he  attack  will  be  made  on  D  day  at  H  hour. 

(c)  MISSIONS  of  this  Corps  in  detail: 

(1)  'i'o  carry  without  delay  the  high  grourui  ricrtli  ^ind  east  of  .\NDE\'ANNE  and  to 
a.ssist  tlie  attack  of  the  r>th  Cor])S. 

(2)  To  |irotcct  the  right  flank  of  the  attack. 

(d)  ()H.IECTI\-ES,  first  day: 

The  line  from  I.ES  Tl'ILERIES  (exc.)  along  the  northeastern  borders  of  I..\  CAR- 
RIERE  BOIS,  thence  along  the  ridge  running  southeast  from  .VNDEVANNE  to  the  northern 
corner  of  BOIS  DES  R.VPPES. 

(e)  EXPLOITATION: 

(09,2-9.5.;!)— road  fork  (11.2-93..5)  — ( 11  8-92.:^)— 10..5-91..5)— jioint  on  ro.id  (11.0-90.3)  — 
(13.0-SS.N)— thence  .south  to  BOIS  DE  FORET. 

(f)  BOLINDARIES:    CORPS: 

East:      Middle     point      BETHIXCOriiT—  ( l(i.8-77.0)  — ( lli.0-79.3)  — ( l(i.l)-8t.2)— The 
MEUSE  River  (exc). 

West:     .WOCOL'RT    (exc.)— CIERCiES    (inc.)— to    point    (0().0-St.»)  — (O(j.9-90  0)  — 
thence  Northeast  to   (09.2-9.5.3). 

2.  THIS  DIVISION: 

(a)  Troops:    'i'he  .5th   Divisicm    (less  Artillery). 

3rd   F.   ,\.   Brigade. 
2sl.th  Air  Squadron. 
9th  Balloon  Co. 

(b)  Zone  of  action:  East  boundary:  Middle  point  BETHINCOrRT—(  1(1.8-77. 0)  — 
(lfi.0-84..2)— The  MEUSE  River  (exc).  West  boundary:  NANTIl.I.OIS— CUNEL  road— 
ea,stern  edge  of  BOIS  DE  LA  Pl'LTIERE— eastern  edge'of  BOIS  DES  R A  1'1'KS— AIN'CRE- 
VILLE  (inc)— BOIS  DE  B.VBIEMOXT  (inc.). 

(c)  It  will  relieve  the  3rd  Division  during  the  night  of  D  minus  1/D.  It  will  develop 
by  strong  jiatrols  the  main  line  of  resistance  of  the  enemy;  seize  and  hold  any  ground  that 
the  advance  of  the  90th  Division  (on  our  left)  makes  possible,  and  exploit  to  the  line 
(11.0-90.3)  — (13.0-88.8)— thence  south  of  BOIS  DE  FORET.  It  will  be  in  position  to  carry 
out  its  mission  at   H  minus  2  hours. 

3.  (a)  The  9tli  Brigade  will  send  out  a  strong  patrol  of  not  less  than  a  battalion  of 
infantry  and  a  machine  gun  company  from  the  northern  edge  of  the  BOIS  DE  R.VPPES 
to  seize  and  hold  the  HOIS  DE  B.VBIEMONT.  This  o]>eration  will  be  co-ordinated  as  to  time 
of  starting  with  a  similar  jiatrol  sent  out  from  the  same  vicinity  by  the  90tli  Division  to  operate 
more  to  the  west.  The  route  followed  by  the  ]iatrol  in  reaching  its  objective  will  include 
IXCREVILLE,  where  a  small  garrisim  will  be  left  to  hnUl  the  village.  With  this  limitation 
tlie  route  to  be  followed  and  the  formation  to  he  taken  will  be  such  as  to  reduce  the  possi- 
bility of  loss  from  artillery  fire  from  the  right  to  a  mininuim. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division 


303 


M,^  \fter  the  patrol  described  above  has  gained  its  ol,jective  and  is  in  posit >on  to  assist 
bv  flankinrflre  a'  song  patrol  from  the  9th  Brigade,  covered  by  a  mach  ne  gun  barrage 
will  be^shed  forward  from  the  northern  edge  of  the  HOIS  DE  FORET  to  seize  and  hold 
CLERY  LE  GRAND  and  Cote  2.il   (about  1  ktn.  northeast  of  CLERY  LE  GRAND). 

(e)   The  9-A  Battalion  will  not  be  used  for  any  purpose  of  exploitation. 

(d)  ARTILLERY: 

(n  \rtillerv  preparation  will  begin  at  H  minus  2  hours. 

.  MNCREVILLE,  BOLS  DE  BABIEMt.XT,  CLERY  LE  GRAND.  Cote  ^-.l  and  the 

(->  -^J^^*-'^^^'  "         '  iTXCRFVII  I  E— DOULCON   road  in  .square  29  and  39 

rado  liaison  with  the  planes  assigned  for  duty  to  this  division.  l^H,    Corps 

4,  (a)  C'ombat  liaison  between  this  division  and  the  left  f^^^^.^^.^^^^'tZ: 
(Freneh)  "n  our  right  will  he  aeeomplished  by  one  company  of  infantry  and  one  platoon 
machine  guns  from  the  10th  Brigade.  „,.„.l,ine 

(h)  On  the  left,  with  the  90th  Division,  by  one  platoon  of  infantry  and  one  section  machuu 
guns  from  both  divisions. 

(o)   For   Liai.son   Plan,  unchanged   unless   notilied    later. 

5.  P.  C.'s.     3rd  Corps,  MALANCOURT. 

.5th  Division,  unchanged. 

9th  and   10th  Brigades,  unchanged.  ^     ^     ^^^^ 

Major   General. 


304  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


5th  Division, 

31st   October,  1918. 
20  Hours. 


FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  65. 

Maps:    MEZIERES)  ,  ,;„  nnn 
VERDUN     p  =50,000. 

1.  (a)  In  the  event  of  the  withdrawal  of  the  enemy,  the  First  American  Army  will  pursue 
at  once  in  the  general  direction  of  the  line  ETAIN — STENAY — STONNE,  and  keep  in  close 
contact  with  him. 

(b)  The  3rd  Corps  will  pursue  in  the  general  direction  of  STENAY  and  assist  the  17th 
French  Corps  in  the  prompt  occupation  of  the  heights  of  the  MEUSE  between  DUN-SUR- 
MEUSE  and  DAMVILLERS. 

(c)  The  zone  of  action  of  the  3rd  Corps  is  shown  on  map  herewith. 

(d)  Troops:   From  left  to  right:  90th  Division,  32nd  Division,  5th  Division. 

2.  This  division  will  pursue  within  the  zone  indicated  on  the  map.  Its  axial  road  is  indi- 
cated in  red. 

3.  (a)  Brigades  will  pursue  side  by  side,  the  !)th  Brigade  on  the  left,  the  10th  Brigade  on 
the  right,  dividing  line  between  brigades  Ijeing  shown  in  black  on  map. 

(b)  The  9th  Brigade  will  cross  the  MEUSE  between  DUN-SUR-MEUSE  and  point 
15.2-89.2,  and  will  pursue  approximately  along  the  line  (broken  blue)  shown  on  map  within  its 
zone. 

(c)  The  10th  Brigade  will  cross  the  MEUSE  at  some  point  between  15.2-89.2  and  15.6-85.0, 
and  will  pursue  approximately  along  the  broken  blue  line  within  its  zone,  shown  on  map. 

(d)  One  regiment  of  F.  A.  (75's)  will  be  attached  to  each  infantry  brigade  for  the 
operation. 

(e)  The  remaining  artillery  of  the  division  and  the  13th  M.  G.  Battalion,  as  divisional 
reserve,  will  follow  the  axial  road  and  remain  about  3  kms.  behind  the  rear  elements  of  the 
main  body  of  troops  on  this  road.  This  column  will  be  constituted  from  head  to  rear,  13th 
M.  G.  Battalion,  F.  A.  (75's),  F.  A.  (15.5's). 

(f)  One  company  of  engineers  will  be  attached  to  each  infantry  brigade,  and  will  be  used 
to  facilitate  its  advance  by  opening  roads  and  trails,  following  the  advance  battalions  as  closely 
as  conditions  will  permit. 

(g)  The  Division  Engineer  will  construct  foot  bridges  for  the  passage  of  the  infantry, 
and,  as  soon  as  sufficient  forces  have  crossed  to  cover  it,  will  construct  a  ponton  bridge  in  the 
vicinity  of  LINY-DEVANT-DUN,  suitalile  for  the  passage  of  75's.  A  bridge  for  heavy 
artillery  will  be  constructed  at  DUN-SUR-MEUSE.  Bridge  material  will  be  procured  at 
once  and  the  necessary  reconnaissance  made  by  the  Division  Engineer.  Upon  the  completion 
of  the  bridges  specified  above,  the  engineers,  less  two  companies,  will  be  employed  on  the  axial 
road. 

(h)  The  Division  Surgeon  will  make  the  necessary  arrangements  for  the  evacuation  of  the 
sick  and  wounded. 

(x)  (1)  The  advance  main  bodies  must  be  so  regulated  that  they  wUl  not  be  carried  into 
the  zone  of  the  effective  fire  of  the  mass  of  the  enemy's  artillery  installed  in  a  previously 
prepared  position  before  the  latter  has  been  uncovered  by  an  advance  guard. 

(2)  Hostile  resistance  to  particular  columns  will  be  relieved  by  the  action  of  adjacent 
columns. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  305 

.  (3)   Brigades  will  maintain  liaison  with  each  other  and  with  divisions  on  their  flanks  by 
strong  flank  guards  from  which  liaison  detachments  will  be  thrown  out. 

4.  Plan  of  Communication,  Evacuation  and  Supply  to  be  issued  later. 

5.  Any  amendments  to  Plan  of  Liaison  will  be  issued  later. 

Axes  of  Liaison  AINCREVILLE— DOULCOX,  then  axial  road. 
P.  C's: 

Division— CUNEL. 

1st  move— probably  MURVAUX. 
Brigades:   To  be  announced  later. 

H.   E.  Elt, 

Major  GeneraL 


.'?()6  Histor//  of  ilic  FifiJi  Division 


5tli  Division, 

3rd    November,    1918. 
16  Hours. 

FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  b"8. 

Maps:    MEZIERES) 

VERDUN     j  l='50-ffO. 

1.  'Die  enemy  is  in  full  retreat  in  front  of  tlie  fldtli  Division.  Reliable  reports  indicate 
that  he  is  also  withdrawinfr  on  our  front  from  tlic  cast  lianli  of  tlie  MEl^SE  in  a  northeasterly 
direction. 

2.  Field  Order  No.  65,  5th  Division,  will  f;o  into  effect  at  once. 

3.  'I'wo  ponton  bridges  now  in  the  BOIS  DE  CUISY,  near  MONTF.VUCON  are  at  the 
disposal  of  the  division.  Two  Engineers  officers  will  be  at  NANTILLOIS  at  19  hours,  today, 
for  the  purpose  of  conducting  them  to  their  destination.  One  bridge  will  be  assigned  to  the 
10th  Brigade  and  one  to  the  9th  Brigade.  Tlic  liridge  for  tlie  lOtli  Brigade  will  be  constructed 
in  the  vicinity  of  BRIEUI.I.ES.  That  for  the  9tli  Brigade  at  the  .southern  exit  of  DUN-SUR- 
MEUSE,  or  if  found  impracticable  to  construct  it  tlu-re,  then  approximately  one  kilometer 
south  of  this  point  at  a  place  jireviously  reconnoitered  by  tlic  Engineers. 

4.  Plan  of  communication,  evacuation  and  sn]i]ily  to  be  issued  later. 

5.  P.  C.'s — Division — Will  cli>se  at  its  |irescnt  Icpcatioii  ,it  midniglit  3/4  November  and 
o])en  at  Cl'NEL  at  the  same  date  and  liour. 

Brigades — To  lie  announced  later. 

H.   E.  Ei.Y. 

Major   General. 


ImportanI  Field  Orders  of  Fifth   Division  307 


C.  5th  Division, 
4th   November,  1918. 
20  Hours. 


SECRET 
FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  69. 


Map.s:    MEZIERESl  ,  .„  „„„ 
VERDUN        '^•^"•"'^"- 


1.  The  enemy  continues  his  retreat.  The  First  .Xrniy  will  press  its  pursuit  with  the  utmost 
vigor.  The  Third  Corps  will  continue  its  pursuit.  The  90tli  Division  will  reconnoiter  cros.sings 
in  the  direction  of  STEN.W  and  push  ))atrols  across  the  MEUSE  between  WISEPPE  and 
S.\SSEY-Sl'R-MErSE.  The  ITth  Corps  (French)  on  our  left  will  seize  the  heights  south- 
west of  BREHEVILEE.     The  mission  of  the  32nd  Division  remains  unchanged. 

2.  This  division  will  continue  the  execution  of  the  mission  ordered  in  Field  Orders  No.  05 
and  No.  68,  5th  Division. 

3.  (a)  Brigades  within  their  sectors  will  push  the  enemv  with  the  utmost  vigor  so  as  to 
gain  the  heights  of  COTE  ST.  GER.M.MN  and  the  heights  south  of  MURVAUX.  Advance 
of  the  main  body  beyond  this  line  will  not  be  made  without  orders  from  these  headquarters. 
Liai.son  will  lie  maintained  with  the  90th  Division  on  our  left  and  the  17th  Corps  (French)  on 
the  right. 

(I))  The  Artillerv  of  the  90th  Division  will  assist  this  division  in  the  crossing  of  the 
MEUSE. 

i.  Administrative  details:     Unchanged. 

5.  Plan  of  Liaison  and  P.  C.  s:   Unchanged. 

H.   E.  Elt, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


308  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

Hq.  5th  Division, 

5th  November,  1918. 
18  Hours. 
FIELD  ORDER, 
No.  70. 

Maps:   DUN-SUR-MEUSE) 

BRANDEVILLE     j  ^■■■'"'"'^"• 

1.  The  attack  of  the  1st  American  Army  continues  to  meet  with  success.  The  5th  Division 
has  driven  the  enemy  from  his  strong  positions  on  tlie  lieights  east  of  tlie  MEUSE.  The 
17th  Corps  (French)  is  attacking  on  our  riglit,  and  has  for  its  objective  BREHEVILLE. 

2.  (a)  This  division  will  continue  the  attack  tomorrow,  and  will  gain  and  organize  for 
defense  the  line: 

LION-DEVANT-DUN— COTE   DE   ST.  GERMAIN— 'feRANDEVILLE,   and  high 

ground  north  and  south  of  BR.'^^NDEVILLE. 
H  hour  will  be  8  A.  M. 

(b)  Divisional  Boundaries  shown  on  map  attached  to  F.  O.  No.  65,  these  Headquarters, 
are  as  follows: 

Southern  Boundary:  VILOSNES  (exc.)  to  point  21.2-87.0— BRANDEVILLE 
(inc.). 

Northern  Boundary:  DUN-SUR-MEUSE  (inc.),  LION-DEVANT-DUN  (inc.), 
CHARMOIS  (exc). 

Boundary  between  brigades,  as  given  on  map  with  F.  O.  No.  65,  is  amended  and  will 
be:  Point  (17.0-88.0)  to  (20.0-90.4)  to  (20.5-91.-l)  to  208  (in  squared  12)  to  point 
(23.5-94.0). 

3.  (a)  The  lOtli  Brigade,  on  the  right,  will  continue  its  attack  and  will  take  and  organize 
for  defense  the  line: 

BRANDEVILLE,  and  the  high  ground  north  and  south  of  BRANDEVILLE,  in- 
cluding CHAIMUSSON  and  BOIS  DU  CORROL. 
It  will  be  reinforced  by  the  128th  Infantry,  32nd  Division,  which  will  report  to  the  Command- 
ing General,  lOth  Brigade,  at  BRIEULLES  before  22  hours  today.  This  regiment  will  be  used 
for  tlank  protection.  Flank  protection  will  be  provided  by  holding  with  one  battalion  the 
southeastern  edge  of  BOIS  DE  CHATILLON  and  HiU  252,  one  battalion,  Cote  284  (18.0-87.0), 
and  one  battalion  the  ridge  from  about  point  22.3-90.0,  southwe,st  about  2^^  kms.  Liaison  will 
be  gained  with  elements  of  the  17th  Corps  (French)  at  BREHEVILLE. 

(b)  The  9th  Brigade  will  take  and  organize  for  defense  the  Une: 
LION-DEVANT-DUN,  COTE  ST.  GERMAIN  and  Cote  350. 

(c)  The  division  reserve  will  consist  of  the  13th  M.  G.  Battalion,  one  battalion  each  from 
the  9th  and  10th  Brigades.  The  Infantry  battalions  will  remain  west  of  the  MEUSE,  that  of 
the  10th  Brigade  in  the  vicinity  of  BRIEULLES,  and  that  of  the  9th  Brigade  in  the  vicmity 
of  CLERY-LE-PETIT.    The  13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion  will  be  stationed  at  DOULCON. 

(d)  Artillery: 

One  regiment  of  field  artillery  (75's)  will  remain  attached  to  each  infantry  brigade.  The 
155's  will  be  placed  in  position  along  the  road  BRIEULLES— CLERY-LE-PETIT— DOUL- 
CON, and  will  not  be  at  a  greater  distance  than  li/j  kms.  west  of  the  river.  Other  regiments 
of  75's  attached  to  this  division  will  move  under  the  orders  of  the  artillery  brigade  commander. 

(e)  The  Engineers  will  continue  on  their  present  duties. 
4..  For  Administrative  Details,  see  G-1  Order  attached. 

Division  unchanged— subsequently  DUN-SUR-MEUSE. 
5.  P.  C.'s: 

9th  Brigade:   CLERY-LE-GRAND— subsequently  MURVAUX. 

10th  Brigade:    BRIEULLES— subsequently  FONTAINES. 

3rd  F.  A.  Brigade:  FME.  DE  LA  MADELEINE— subsequently  DUN-SUR-MEUSE. 

H.   E.  Ely, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  309 


Hq.  5th  Division, 

6th  November,  1918. 
19  Hours. 


FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  71. 


Maps:    DUN-SUR-MEUSEj 

BRANDEVILLE     j  ^^-'^'^^^■ 


1.  The  enemy's  retreat  continues.  To  the  west  he  is  retreating  on  a  wide  front.  The 
5th  Division  has  defeated  the  enemy  on  the  right  bank  of  the  MEUSE,  and  has  driven  him  in 
some  places  more  than  ten  liilometers. 

2.  This  division  will  continue  the  operation  prescribed  in  Field  Order  No.  70,  these  head- 
quarters, and  ujiun  reaching  the  objectives  will  organize  them  defensively,  pending  a  further 
advance. 

3.  (a)  The  division  will  hold  in  depth  the  ground  gained  along  lines  as  follows: 
Outposts:    Northern  edge  of  LION-DEVT-DUN— foot  of  bluffs  of  Cote  350— Foot  of 

bluffs  of  LE  HAUT  GRON— northeast  exit  of  BRANDEVILLE,  thence  to  northeast  edge  of 
Cote  378. 

Line  of  Resistance:  Cote  350,  BOIS  DE  CORROL— BOIS  DE  BRANDEVILLE,  on 
both  sides  of  town. 

(b)  Second  Position:  Southwestern  part  of  Cote  ST.  GERMAIN— MURVAUX— HILL 
343  (in  square  90)— HILL  344  (in  square  09)— HILL  370  (in  square  20)— to  Cote  388  (in 
square  29). 

(c)  Reserve  Position:  BOIS  DE  DUN,  BOIS  DE  BUSSY,  BOIS  DE  CHATILLON. 

(d)  Brigade  Commanders  will  take  immediate  steps  to  organize  and  strengthen  the  posi- 
tion, as  outlined  above,  within  their  respective  zones. 

(e)  Commanding  General,  10th  Brigade,  will  seek  to  strengthen  the  liaison  on  his  right 
flank. 

(f)  ArtiUery:  All  supporting  artillery  attached  to  brigades  will  be  moved  at  once  east  of 
the  MEUSE,  and  will  take  positions  to  cover  the  front  and  to  support  a  further  advance. 

(g)  The  7th  Engineers  will  continue  on  their  present  work. 

4.  Administrative  Details:   Changes  will  follow. 

5.  P.  C.'s: 

Division  unchanged,  subsequently  to  DUN-SUR-MEUSE. 
9th  and  10th  Brigades  and  3rd  F.  A.  Brigade  unchanged. 

H.  E.  Elt, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


310  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


p.  C.  5th  Division, 

7th  Nuveniber,  1918. 
20  Hours. 

SECRET 
FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  72. 

Map.s:    DUN-SUR-MEUSE) 

BRANDEVIl.LE     )  ^-'"""^'• 

1.  Our  .succcs.s  i.s  continuing  ;inil  wc  have  driven  the  enemy  from  important  po.sitions  on 
our  front.  Tlie  Froneli  division  on  our  right  attacked  this  morning  and  lias  made  notable 
progress. 

2.  This  division  will  complete  the  capture  ami  cleaning  up  of  all  i)art,s  of  the  line  of 
heights  described  in  Field  Order  No.  71,  these  head(|uarters,  and  will  organize  them  as  directed 
in  the  same  order. 

3.  (a)  Brigades  will  estaljlish  liaison  groups  along  tlie  divisional  boundary  in  touch  with 
those  of  the  divisions  on  the  right  and  left,  ami  will  jiatrol  tu  the  front  to  keej)  contact  with 
the  enemy. 

(b)  .lilillcrii :  The  divisional  artillery,  in  addition  to  covering  the  front  of  this  division, 
will  lie  so  jJaced  as  to  assist  with  flanking  tire  the  defense  of  the  neighboring  divisions. 

(c)  All  organizations  w-ill  take  advantage  i>i  the  momentary  lull  in  the  forward  move- 
ment to  re-equip  and  reorganize,  ]ire]iaratory  to  further  advance. 

(il)  Pursuant  to  Field  Order  Xo.  53,  3rd  Corps,  the  northern  lioundary  of  this  division 
will  be  as  follows:  AIXCREVILLE  inclusive  to  11.0-9(1.3  to  FERME  DE  ".IIPII.LE  exclu- 
sive to  U.5-91.7  (on  east  bank  of  MEl'SE),  thence  along  east  bank  .d"  MECSE  north  to 
canal,  thence  along  canal  to  MOl'ZAY. 

-t.   Administrative   details:     Xo   change. 

5.  P.  C.  5th  Division  will  close  at  Cl'NEI,  at  9  A.  M.,  8th  Xovember,  1918.  and  will  open 
at  DUN-SUR-MEUSE  same  hour  and  date. 

Infantry  Brigade  P.  C.'s:    Unchanged. 

P.  C.  .ird  Fi.ld  \rtillery  will  o])en  at  I)(  X-SUR-MEUSE  .same  date  and  hour  as  that  of 
the  Division. 

H.   E.   Ely, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  311 


p.   C.   5tli  Division, 

9tli  November,  1918. 
12  Hours. 


SECRET 

FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  73. 

Maps:    BRANDEVILLE 
MONTMEDY         | 
VIRTON  I 

MARVILLE 


1 :2U,0UO. 


1.  Tlie  enemy  continues  the  retreat  from  the  MEUSE  to  the  North.  In  the  event  of  his 
withdrawal  east  of  the  MEUSE,  the  3rd  Corps  will  press  him  vigorously  all  along  its  front 
and  will  follow  promptly  his  withdrawal.  The  fldth  Division  will  pursue  on  the  left,  the  5th 
Division  in  the  center  and  the  32nd  Division  on  the  right. 

2.  (a)  In  the  event  of  pursuit,  this  division  will  pursue  within  its  zone.  It  will  relieve 
the  1.5th  Division  (French)  in  that  part  of  its  sector  north  of  D-\.M\'II,1,EHS.  This  addi- 
tional front  will  be  added  to  the  sector  of  the  10th  Brigade  until  taken  over  liy  the  32nd 
Division. 

(b)  Zone  of  action  of  the  3rd  Corps: 

Southern  boundarv:  Vll.OSXES  (inc.)— HAR.MMONT  (inc.)— ECUREY  (inc.) 
— DAMVILLERS  (e.xc.)— VU.LERS-LES-MANGIENNES  (exc.)— SORBEY  (inc.)  — 
ARRANCY  (inc.). 

Northern  boundary:    STENAY   (inc.)— CHAUVENEY    (inc.)— MONTMEDY    (inc.) 
—VIRTON   (inc.). 
5th  Division: 

Southern  boundary:  FONT.VINES  (exc.)— BR.VNDEVII.LE  (inc.)— J.VMETZ 
(inc.)— PETIT  FAILLY  (inc.)— LONGUYON  (exc). 

Northern  boundary:  MILLY-DEV.\XT-DUN  (inc.)— CHARMOIS  CHATEAU 
(inc.)— north  end  of  FORET  WOEVRE— IRE-I,E-SEC  (inc.)— OTHE  (exc.)— .Vl.LON- 
DRELLE    (inc.). 

(c)  Corps,  divisional  and  brigade  boundaries  will  become  effective  immediately  in  case 
of  a  pursuit  acticm,  and  3rd  Corps  boundary  permanently  at  12  hours,  9th  November. 

3.  (a)  Brigades  will  pur.sue  side  by  side,  the  9th  Brigade  on  the  left,  the  10th  Brigade  on 
the  right.  Dividing  line  between  brigades:  MURVAUX  (to  9th  Brigade) — 22.-95.8  (to  9th 
Brigade)— REMOIVII.I.E  (to  10th  Brigade)— VILLERS-I.E-ROND  (to  10th  Brigade)  — 
VILLETE  (to  10th  Brigade). 

(b)  THE  9TH  BRIGADE:    Will  pursue  along  the  route: 
LION-DEVANT-DUN— CHARMOIS,  thence  northeast  to  CHE.MIN-DES-CHARBON- 

NIERS  to  its  termination  in  square  19,  thence  across  country  to  the  LOUPPY-B.A.VLON 
road,  and  thence  via  road  to  JUVIGNY.  .\n  alternative  route  to  JUVIGNY  via  the  unim- 
proved road  through  the  FORET-DE-\V'OK\'RE  from  20.2-94..3  to  cross  road  at  25.75-97.8 
may  prove  better.  A  reconnaissance  of  both  roads  will  be  made  and  the  most  practicable 
selected.  Ai  least  one  battalion  must  proceed  by  the  route  which  is  not  selected  for  the  main 
body.  Should  reconnaissance  prove  both  of  the  routes  to  .JUVIGNY  imjiracticable  for  wheel 
transportation,  all  artillery  and  other  transportation  will  follow  the  axial  road  to  I^OUPPY. 
From  .lUVIGXY,  the  route  .lUVIGXY— M.VRVILLE  (from  316-98.2  via  axial  road),  thence 
axial  road  to  CH.VRENCY,  will  be  followed.  It  will  cover  the  crossings  of  the  90th  Division 
between  S.VSSEY  and  STEX'.W  liy  flank  guard  of  two  battalions,  two  companies  of  machine 
guns  and  a  battery  of  artillerv.  This  flank  guard  will  move  in  the  direction  CH.\RMOIS 
CHATE.A.U— north  end  of  FORET-DE-WOEVRE— H.VN-LES-JUVIGNY. 

(c)  THE  lOTH  BRIG.VDE  will  i)ursue  approximately  along  the  route  axial  road  to 
JAMETZ,  thence  via  JAMETZ-MAR\'ILI.E  road  to  crossroad  2  kilometers  east  of  MAR- 
VILLE, thence  to  PL.-VBEUVILLE.  Liaison  will  be  maintained  with  the  32nd  Division  on 
the  right  by  flank  guards,  from  which  liaison  detachments  will  be  .sent  out.     The  128th  Infantry, 


312  'History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

now  attached  to  the  10th  Brigade,  will  relieve  the  15th  Division  (French)  in  that  part  of  its 
sector  north  of  DAMVILLERS  (exc).  Relief  to  be  completed  by  noon  9th  November. 
Details  of  this  relief  have  already  been  made. 

(d)  March  of  brigades  in  pursuit  will  be  covered  by  strong  advance  guards,  supported 
by  artillery,  sufficiently  distant  to  insure  that  the  main  body  of  the  brigade  will  not  be  brought 
within  the  zone  of  artiUery  fire  before  the  enemy's  position  is  developed. 

(e)  One  regiment  of  Field  ArtiUery,  76's,  will  be  attached  to  each  infantry  brigade  for  the 
operation. 

(f)  The  remaining  artillery  of  the  division  and  the  13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion,  as  divi- 
sional reserve,  will  foUow  the  axial  road  and  remain  about  2  kms.  behind  the  rear  elements 
of  the  main  body  of  troops  on  this  road.    This  column  will  be  constituted  from  head  to  rear: 

13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion. 

F.  A.  75's  (if  such  are  attached). 

F.  A.  155's. 

(g)  One  company  of  engineers  will  be  attaclied  to  each  infantry  brigade  and  wiU  be  used 
to  facilitate  its  advance  by  opening  roads  and  trails,  following  the  advance  battalions  as 
closely  as  conditions  will  permit.  Balance  of  Engineers  will  work  on  axial  road,  well  forward, 
ready  to  repair  route  of  march  promptly. 

4.  Axial  roads: 

3rd  Corps:  DUN-SUR-MEUSE— MURVAUX— REMOIVILLE— JAMETZ— MAR- 
VILLE— LONGUYON. 

5th  Division:  DUN-SUR-MEUSE— LOUPPY— JAMETZ— MARVILLE—CHAR- 
ENCY. 

5.  Axis  of  liaison:   Same  as  axial  road. 
Division  P.  C.  will  move  along  axis  of  liaison. 

Brigade  P.  C.'s  will  foUow  the  route  taken  by  their  brigades. 

H.  E.  Ely, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division  313 


p.  C.  5th  Division, 

9tli  November,  1918. 
14   Hours. 

SECRET 
FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  74. 

Maps:    BRANDEVILLE\ 

MONTMEDY         \  ^.^^^^^ 
VIRTON  (  i.-iJ,uuu. 

MARVILLE  ) 

1.  Reports  indicate  tliat  the  enemy  has  withdrawn  to  tlie  northeast.  He  is  believed  to  have 
halted  on  the  heights  two  kms.  east  of  STEN.A.Y— nortii  of  BAALON— north  of  REMOI- 
VILLE— DELUT— COTE  DE  ROMAGNE.  His  patrols  have  been  encountered  in  the 
FORET  DE  WOEVRE.  The  2nd  Colonial  Corps  is  advancing  on  our  right.  We  hold 
MOUZAY.  The  3rd  Corps  will  pursue.  The  advance  guard  of  the  32nd  Division  will  cross 
the  line  MOUZAY— CHARMOIS  CH,\TEAU— BRAXDEVILLE  at  14  hours  today.  The 
90th  Division  will  commence  the  crossing  of  its  infantry  immediately. 

2.  This  division  will  pursue  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Field  Order  No.  73,  these 
headquarters. 

3.  The  advance  guards  of  the  .5th  Division  and  the  flank  guard,  which  is  to  protect  the 
crossing  of  the  90th  Division,  will  cross  the  line  MOUZAY— CHARMOIS  CHATEAU— 
BRANDEVILLE— LISSEY— DAMVILLERS  at  14  hours  today.  The  advance  of  the 
brigades  and  other  units  will  be  carried  out  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Field  Order 
No.  73.  Brigade  commanders  are  responsible  for  the  mopping  up  of  that  part  of  the  FORET 
DE  WOEVRE  which  lies  within  their  zone  of  advance. 

4.  Administrative  details:    No  change. 

5.  P.  C.  3rd  Corps  at  DUN-SUR-MEUSE  after  12  hours,  10th  November,  1918. 

P.  C.  5th  Division  will  close  at  DUN-SUR-MEUSE  at  9  hours,  10th  November,  1918,  and 
will  open  at  MURVAUX,  same  day  and  hour. 

P.  C.  9th  Brigade,  LION-DEVANT-DUN,  6  P.  M.  today. 

P.  C.  10th  Brigade,  BRANDEVILLE,  9  A.  M.,  10th  November,  1918. 

H.  E.  Elt, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


:U1  Histori/  of  the  Fifth  Dixrimon 


p.  C.  5th  Division, 

10th  November,  1918. 
23  Hours. 


SECRET 
FIELD  ORDER, 

No.  75. 

Maps:  BR.\NDEVILI,E\ 
MONTMEDY  / 
\IRTUN  ) 

M.-VRVII.LE 


1 :20,000. 


1.  The  90th  Divisi.m,  on  our  left,  captured  STEN.W  and  the  BOIS  DE  CHENOIS.  The 
32nd  Division,  on  our  riglit,  has  advanced  to  the  western  edfie  of  the  BOIS  DE  M-\NGE  and 
the  BOIS  DE  .MONTR'S,  and  has  penetrated  into  the  BOIS  DE  PO.MMEPRE.  The  3rd 
Corps  will  continue  its  pursuit  and  seize  the  heifihts  overlooking  the  CHIFRES  RIVER 
on  the  line  of  .MONT.MEDY— I.ONGUYON— .\RRANCY. 

2.  The  5th  Division  will  continue  its  pursuit  as  directed  in  Field  Order  No.  73,  these 
headquarters,  driving  hard  on  VII.I.ETTE,  and  seizing  the  line  of  heights  303— BOIS  DE  EA 
GRANGE,  Hill  312. 

3.  (a)  The  9tli  and  10th  Brigades  will  continue  their  pursuit  as  directed  in  Field  Order 
No.  73,  these  headquarters,  seizing  that  part  of  the  line  of  heights  described  in  paragraph  2 
above,  which  lie  within  their  zone.  Strong  patrols  will  be  pushed  to  the  front  from  these 
heights,  keeping  contact  with  the  enemy. 

(b)  The  9th  Brigade  will  maintain  close  touch  with  the  90th  Division,  and  by  its  progres- 
sion south  of  the  BOIS  MONTMEDY  will  assist  that  division  In  taking  the  wood. 

(c)  Liaison  detachments  tlirown  out  from  flank  guards  will  keep  touch  with  the  divisions 
on  our  right  and  left. 

(d)  The  pursuit  will  be  driven  with  the  utmost  vigor. 

(e)  The  Division  artillery  will  continue  Its  mission  of  clo.sely  supporting  the  advance  of 
the  infantry.  One  battalion  of  Corps  .\rtillery,  1.55  G.  P.  F.,  has  been  ordered  to  cross  the 
MEl'SE  and  will  proceed  to  the  region  north  of  BR.\NDE\'ILI,E  to  support  the  advance 
of  the  corjjs. 

4.  .\DMINISTli  ATIVE    DET.MI.S:     Changes    in    circulation    will    follow. 

5.  P.  C.'s: 

Division— next  to  I.OUPPY. 

dth   Brigadi — next  to  .U'VIGNY. 

lOtli  Brigade— next  to  I.OUPPY. 

3rd   F.  A.  Brigade— next  to  LOL'PPY. 

H.   E.  EiY, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


Important  Field  Orders  of  Fifth  Division 


Hq.  5th  Division, 

11th   November,  1918. 
8  Hours. 


FIELD  ORDER,  No.  76. 


1.  Field  Order  No.  7.5,  these  headquarters,  is  revoked. 

2.  Hostilities  will  cease  along  the  whole  front  at  11  hours,  11  November,  1918,  Paris  time. 

3.  No  allied  troops  will  pass  ihe  line  reached  by  them  at  that  hour  and  date  until  further 
orders. 

4.  All  communication  with  the  enemy,  l)oth  liefore  and  after  termination  of  hostilities,  is 
absolutely  forbidden.  In  ease  of  violation  of  this  order,  tile  severest  disciplinary  measures 
will  be  taken.     .Any  officer  offending  will  l)e  sent  to  these  headquarters  under  guard. 

5.  Every  em})hasis  will  be  laid  on  the  fact  that  the  arrangement  is  an  armistice  only  and 
not  a  peace. 

().  There  nuist  not  lie  the  sliglitest  relaxation  of  vigilance.  Troops  must  be  prepared  at 
any  moment   for  further  operations. 

7.  During  the  armistice,  should  anyone  from  the  enemy's  jiosition  approach  our  line  with 
a  white  flag,  he  will  lie  received  by  an  officer,  blindfolded,  and  conducted  to  the  nearest  bat- 
talion P.  C,  where  he  will  be  detained  and  the  fact  of  his  arrival  communicated  as  promptly 
as  possible  to  these  headquarters  for  instructions.  Pending  receipt  of  these  instructions,  no 
conversation  will  be  had  with  the  person,  or  [larty,  who  has  thus  presented  himself,  except  by 
the  officer  who  has  received  him,  and  his  conversation  will  be  limited  to  finding  out  the  purpose 
for  which  he  w^as  sent. 

8.  Special  steps  will  lie  taken  by  all  commanders  to  insure  the  strict  discipline,  and 
that  all  troops  are  in  readiness  and  fully  prejiared  for  any  eventualities.  Brigade  com- 
manders will  )iersonally  inspect  all  organizations  with  the  foregoing  view. 

H.   E.   Ely, 

Major  General, 
Commanding. 


316  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

DECORATIONS   BESTOWED   ON    MEMBERS   OF    FIFTH    DIVISION 

CONGRESSIONAL  MEDAL  OF  HONOR 
CaiJt.  Edward  O.  Allworth,  60th  Inf.  1st  Lieut.  Samuel  WoodfiU,  60th  Inf. 

DISTINGUISHED  SERVICE  MEDAL 

Maj.  Gen.   Hanson  E.  Ely,  Commanding  Sth  Col.  Robert  H.  Pierson,  Div.  Surg. 

Div.  Col.  Phillip  B.  Peyton,  Commanding  6Ist  Inf. 

Brig.   Gen.   J.    C.   Castner,   Commanding   9th  Col.  Rohert  H.  Peck,  Commanding  llth  Inf. 

Inf.  Brig.  Col.  Earl  G.  Paules,  Commanding  7th  Eng. 

Brig.  Gen.  Paul  B.  Malone,  Commanding  10th  Lieut.  Col.  Stephen  C.  Reynolds,  A.  C.  of  S., 

Inf.  Brig.  G-1. 
Col.  C.  A.  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff,  Sth  Div. 

DISTINGUISHED  SERVICE  CROSS 

DrVISION    HeADOI  ARTERS 

Capt.  Harry  L.  Eraser,  Q.  M.  C.   (deceased). 


Sixtieth  Infantry 


Capt.  Dalton  E.  Brady. 

Capt.  Lee  S.  Eads  (deceased). 

Capt.  Horace  R.  Tune. 

1st  Lieut.  Rex  P.  Enochs. 

1st  Lieut.  Judson  G.  Martell   (deceased). 

1st  Lieut.  Otha  K.  Morrison, 

1st  Lieut.  Washington  Reed. 

2nd  Lieut.  John  B.  Crone. 

2nd  Lieut.  John  E.   Eigenauer. 

Sgt.  Allie  Swaggerty,  Hdqtrs.  Co. 

Mec.  Charles  W.  Brison,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Steve  Houchar,  Co.  A. 

Cpl.  Kenneth  Birchfield,  Co.  B. 

1st  Sgt.  Vincil  E.  Brown,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Oscar  E.  Johnson,  Co.  B. 

Sup.  Sgt.  Arthur  M.  Fuller,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Peter  A.  DeVos,  Co.  C. 

Sgt.  Jo.seph  La  Jennessee,  Co.  D. 

Cpl.  Francis  Ackley,  Co.  D. 

Cpl.  Henry  J.  Davis,  Co.  D. 


Cpl.  Hyman  Silverman,  Co.  E. 

Cpl.  Anthony  M.  Wallace,  Co.  E. 

Cpl.  Robert  F.  Warren  (deceased),  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  William  Gander,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Alexander  Scandel,  Co.  E. 

Cpl.  Theodore  J.  DeCar],  Co.  F. 

Sgt.  Louis  Surdez,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Edd  Belk,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  John  B.  Mitchell,  Co.  G. 

Sgt.  Harland  D.  Morris,  Co.  H. 

1st  Sgt.  Lockwood  Williams,  Co.  I. 

Sgt.  Reed  S.  Douglas,  Co.  I. 

Mec.  Ludwig  Genrich,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Max  Schoemaker,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  John  Zlotnikoff,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Charles  Mass,  Co.  L. 

Sup.  Sgt.  Alexander  N.  Ruddock   (deceased), 

Co.  M. 
Sgt.  Severt  J.  Nelson  (deceased),  Co.  M. 
Cpl.  Charles  D.  Round,s,  Co.  M. 


SixTY-tTRST  Infantry 


Lieut.  Col.  Lowe  A.  McClure. 

Maj.  Alexander  N.  Stark,  Jr. 

Capt.  Russell  S.  Fisher. 

2nd  Lieut.  Jes.se  A.  Montee. 

2nd  Lieut.  Oakley  L.  Parkhill. 

Sgt.  Howard  Bradshaw  (deceased),  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  William  B.  Cochran    (deceased),  Co.   A. 

Pvt.  William  Berry,  Co.  A. 

Pvt.  Jesse  L.  Cline,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  Leland  Brown,  Co.  B. 


Cpl.  Robert  Hill,  Co.  C. 

1st  Sgt.  Paul  C.  Rowan  (deceased),  Co.  D. 

Sgt.  Edgar  F.  Reed  (deceased),  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  George  R.  Fratus,  Co.  F. 

Sgt.  Earl  BiUingsley,  Co.  H. 

Sgt.  Edgar  C.  Davis,  Co.  H. 

Sgt.  Hubert  C.  Morris,  Co.  H. 

Sgt.  Emmett  McBride,  Co.  I. 

Sgt.  Russell  Oke,  Co.  L. 

Sgt.  Charles  Lewis   (deceased),  Co.  M. 


Foubteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion 
Sgt.  Jay  C.  Pritchard,  Co.  D. 


Winners  of  Decorations 


317 


Sixth  Infantet 


Lieut.  Col.  Courtney  H.  Hodges. 

Lieut.  Col.  John  W.  Leonard. 

Capt.  Jabez  G.  Gholston. 

Capt.  Guy  L.  Hartman. 

1st  Lieut.  Harry  C.  Barnes. 

1st  Lieut.  Edward  A.  Macguire. 

1st  Lieut.  Josiah  P.  Mudge. 

1st  Lieut.  Roger  H.  MuUen. 

1st  Lieut.  Julius  Niles   (deceased). 

1st  Lieut.  Maurice  W.  Riker. 

1st  Lieut.  George  Thorngate. 

2nd  Lieut.  Charles  V.  Abernathy. 

2nd  Lieut.  Robert  G.  Carter. 

2nd  Lieut.  Paul  J.  Drasigroch. 

2nd  Lieut.  George  H.  Ferguson. 

2nd  Lieut.  Gordon  Stapleton. 

Cpl.      Joseph      G.      Armistead      (deceased), 

Hdqtrs.  Co. 
Sgt.  Charles  L.  Hicks,  Co.  A. 
Sgt.  Alexander  Stoker,  Co.  A. 
Sgt.  Fred  F.  Spivey,  Co.  B. 


Cpl.  Thomas  Gassoway,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Russell  K.  Adair,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Clarence  Awbrey,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Roland  D.  Lynch,  Co.  B. 

Sgt.  Harry  A.  Williamson.  Co.  C. 

Sgt.  William  Ruppell,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Angelo  Casselo,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Frank  Endler,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Daniel  Whitaker,  Co.  D. 

Cpl.  Chester  V.  Davis,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  William  A.  Black,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Thomas  V.  Sharp  (deceased),  Co.  F. 

Sgt.  Gilmore  Tomlin,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Harry  Davis,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  Christ  Papadakis,  Co.   H. 

Pvt.  Luther  Gay,  Co.  L. 

Sgt.  Lockhom  Hupman,  Co.  L. 

Sgt.  Bruce  Epley,  Co.  M. 

Cpl.  Charley  Howard,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Arthur  J.  Young,  Med.  Dct. 


Eleventh  Infantet 


Col.  Robert  H.  Peck. 

Lieut.  Col.  R.  John  West. 

Maj.  John  H.  Muncaster. 

Maj.  Martin  C.   Rudolph. 

Capt.  John  W.  O'Daniel. 

1st  Lieut.  Almeron  W.  Shanklin   (deceased). 

2nd  Lieut.  Leo  G.  Clark. 

Pvt.  William  Hassebrook,  Mach.  Gun  Co. 

Sgt.  Newman  Davis,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Daniel  Erb,  Co.  D. 

Sgt.  Clyde  F.  Mainwaring  (deceased),  Co.  E. 

Cpl.  Greene  Strothers,  Co.  G. 

l.st  Sgt.  Corbett  Meeks,  Co.  H. 


Sgt.  Anthony  Chirafisi,  Co.  H. 

Cpl.  Tom  Silver.  Co.   H. 

1st  Sgt.  George  Berkley,  Co.  K. 

Sgt.  Jack  Bennett,  Co.  K. 

Cpl.  John  K.  Irons,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Raymond  Harrell,  Co.  K. 

Sgt.  Lloyd  L.  Ferguson,  Co.  L. 

Sgt.  Olex  Phillis,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Joseph  Thornton,  Co.  L. 

Sgt.  George  L.  Ellis,  Co.  M. 

Sgt.  Fred  Smith,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Lester  Brown,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Fielding  V.  Meeks  (deceased),  Med.  Det. 


FrFTEENTH  Machine  Gun  Battalion 


Capt.  Frederick  V.  Burgess. 

1st  Lieut.  William  H.  Kofmehl. 

1st  Lieut.  Josephus   B.   Wilson    (deceased). 

2nd  Lieut.  Henry  H.  Neil. 

Sgt.  Cornelius  O'Rourke,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  Edward  S.  WiUis,  Co.  A. 

Sgt.  Ralph  L.  CofiFman  (deceased),  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Ernest  G.  Lord,  Co.  B. 

Cpl.  Charles  Spitznagel,  Co.  C. 


Pvt.  1st  CI.  Kimon  Karelis,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Charles  W.  Sharkey,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Percy  L.  Dile,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  James  Gottschalk,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Dick  Oosterbann,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Gregory  Wygast,  Co.  C. 

Sgt.  Stanley  Bevan,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Wayne  D.  Mounts,  Co.  D. 


Twentieth  Field  Aettlleet 
1st  Lieut.  Othel  J.  Gee. 


Twentt-fiest  Field  Aethxeet 
Pvt.  1st  CI.  Harry  E.  Garber,  Bat.  F.  Pvt.  1st  CI.  Fred  R.  Weiss,  Bat.  F. 


318 


Historij  of  the  Fifth  Division 


Seventh  Engineers 


Maj.  William  M.  Hoge.  Ci)l. 

Maj.  Wynian  R.  Swan.  Pvt. 

Capt.   Howard   R.  McAdams.  Pvt. 

Capt.  Charles  J.  Moore  (deceased).  Pvt. 

1st  Lieut.  Jo.seph   W.  Gray.  Pvt. 

1st  Lieut.  Fred    D.    Mendenliall.  Pvt. 

Lieut.  Alfred   Jacquin    (French,   attached).  Sfrt. 

Sfrt.  John   C.   Burgin,  Co.  A.  Sgt. 

Sgt.  Harry  W.  Campbell.  Co.  A.  Cpl. 

Sgt.  David  A.  Olijihant,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Sgt.   Patrick  P.  Higgins,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Master  Eng.   Richard  ,1.  Toliin,  Co.  C.  Sgt. 

Sgt.  Eugene  P.  Wallier,  Co.  D.  Sgt. 


Roljert  E.  Crawford,  Co.  D. 

Fred  A.  Crowe,  Co.  D. 

Noah  L.  Gump,  Co.  D. 

John  Hoggle,  Co.  D. 

Irvin  B.  Horn,  Co.  D. 

Stanley  T.  Murniane,  Co.  D. 

l.st  CI."  John  T.  Baker,  Co.  F. 

Otis  C.  Scohy,  Co.  F. 

Walter  S.  Sevalia,  Co.  F. 

1st  CI.  Juliu.s  D.  Larson,  Co.  F. 

Moody  A.  Weeks,  Co.  F. 

1st  CI.  Herliert  Ver  Mehren,  Med.  Det. 

Elmer  W.   Highley,  Med.  Det. 


Thirteenth    Machine   Gin    B.\ttai.ion 


1st  Lieut.   Harry    L.    Smith. 
2nd  Lieut.  Percy  E.  Innian. 
Sgt.   William  L.  Simms. 
Pvt.  1st  CI.  Mandcl  Olson,  Co.  A. 


Pvt.   1st  CI.   Wade  C.  Wales,  Co.  A. 
Sgt.  Clark  Butterfield,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.    l.st    CI.    Frederick    Yannantuoana    (de- 
ceased), Med.  Det. 


Ninth    Field   Signal   Battalion 
Cpl.   Earnest  A.  Carlson,  Co.  C.  Pvt.  Orson  D.   Bleazard,  Jr.,  Co.C. 


Fifth  Amminition  Train 


Cpl.  Earl  Ross,  Co.  B. 
Sgt.  George  W.   Allirecht,  Co.  G. 
Sgt.  Josejih  A.   Bouchard,  Co.  G. 
Cpl.  Charles  G.  Hammons,  Co.  G. 


C'jil.   .\lva  Lee  Johnson,  Co.  G. 
Wag.  David.son  W.  Latham,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Charles  Gustafson,  Co.  G. 


Fifth  Military  Police 
Capt.  George  N.  Miinro   (deceased) 


G.  H.  Q.  CITATIONS 


Lieut.  Col.  George  D.  Kieffer,  .5th  San.  Train. 
Maj.  George  C.  Stull,  Chaplain,  11th  Inf. 
Major  James  Stewart,  Ordnance  Dept. 
1st  Lieut.  G.  C.  Barnes,  5th  Mobile  Ord.  Re- 
pair Shop. 


Sgt.  of  Ord.   Alson   B.   Edgerton,  Ord.   Dept., 

Div.  Hqtrs. 
Cpl.  Fred  Henderson,  Co.  L,  61st  Inf. 
Pvt.  Joe  Morelli,  Ord.  Dept.,  Div,  Hqtrs. 


Winners  of  Decorations 
FOREIGN  DECORATIONS 


319 


LEGION   OF   HONOR    (FRENCH) 

Commander   of  the   Legion   of   Honor    (French) 

Maj.  Gen.  Hanson  E.  Ely,  Commanding  5tli  Div. 

Officers  of  the  Legion  of  Honor   (French) 

Brig.  Gen.  Paul  B.  Malone,  Commanding  10th       Col.  Robert  H.  Peck,  lltli  Inf. 

Inf.   Brig.  Col.  C.  A.  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff,  5th  Div. 


Chevaliers  of  the  Legion  of  Honor   (French) 


Lieut.  Col.  John  W.  Leonard,  6th  Inf. 
Lieut.  Col.  Lowe  A.  McClure,  Gist  Inf. 
Lieut.  Col.  John  Scott,  Div.  Sig.  Officer. 
Lieut.  Col.  R.  John   West,  11  th  Inf. 
Maj.  John  H.   Muncaster,  11th  Inf. 
Maj.   Alexander  N.  Stark,  61st  Inf. 
Maj.   Wvman  R.  Swan,  7th  Eng. 


Capt.  Edward  O.  Allworth,  60th  Inf. 
Capt.  Ru.s,sell  S.  Fisher,  61st  Inf. 
1st  Lieut.  Washington   Reed,  60th   Inf. 
1st  Lieut.  Maurice  W.   Riker,  6th  Inf. 
1st  Lieut.  Samuel  Woodfill,  60th  Inf. 
2nd  Lieut.  Gordon  Stapleton,  Bth  Inf. 


MEDAILLES  MILITAIRES   (FRENCH) 


Sgt.  Harry  W.  Camphell,  7th  Eng. 

Sgt.  .Vrthiir   M.   Fuller,   «()th    Inf. 

Sgt.   William  I..  Sims,  i;3th  Mach.  Gun  Bat. 


Pvt.   1st   CI.  Charles   W.   Sharkey,   1.5th   Mach. 

Gun  Bat. 
Pvt.  Daniel  Erb,  11th  Inf. 
Pvt.   Noah  L.  Gump,  7th  Eng. 


CROIX  DE  GUERRE,  WITH  PALM  (FRENCH) 


Maj.  Gen.   Hanson   E.   Ely,  Commanding  5th 

biv. 
Brig.  Gen.  Paul  B.  Malcme,  Commanding  10th 

Inf.  Brig. 
Col.  Robert  H.  Peck,  llth  Inf. 
Col.  C.  A.  Trott,  Chief  of  Staff,  5th  Div. 
Lieut.  Col.  John   W.   Leonard,  6th   Inf. 
IJeut.  Col.  Lowe  A.  McClure,  61st  Inf. 
Lieut.  Col.  John  Scott,  Div.   Sig.  Officer. 
Lieut.  Col.   R.  John   West,  llth  Inf. 
Maj.  John  H.  Muncaster,  llth  Inf. 
Maj.  Alexander   N.   Stark,  61st  Inf. 
Maj.  Wynian  R.  Swan,  7th  Eng. 


Capt.  Edward  O.   .\llworth,  60th  Inf. 

Cai)t.  Russell  S.   Fi.sher,  61st   Inf. 

l.st  Lieut.  Washington    Reed,   60th    Inf. 

1st  Lieut.   Maurice  W.   Riker,  6th   Inf. 

1st  Lieut.  Samuel  Woodfill,  60th  Inf. 

2nd  Lieut.  Gordon   Stapleton,  6th   Inf. 

Sgt.  Harry  W.  Campbell,  7th  Eng. 

Sgt.  Arthur  M.  Fuller,  60th  Inf. 

Sgt.  William  L.  Sims,  13th  Mach.  Gun  Bat. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Charles  W.  Sharkey,  15th  Mach. 

Gun  Bat. 
Pvt.  Daniel  Erb.  llth  Inf. 
Pvt.  Noah  L.  Gump,  7th  Eng. 


CROIX  DE  GUERRE,  WITH  STAR   (FRENCH) 


Maj.  John  J.  Burleigh,  61st  Inf.  2nd 

Capt.  Frederick  V.  Burgess,  15th  Mach.  Gun       2nd 

Bat.  2nd 

Capt.  William  F.  Demuth,  61st  Inf.  2nd 

Capt.  Howard  R.  McAdams,  7th  Eng.  2nd 

1st  Lieut.  Guy  L.  Hartman,  6th  Inf.  2nd 

1st  Lieut.   Feiix   Kempski,   llth   Inf.  Sgt. 

1st  Lieut.   Roger  H.  Mullen,  6th  Infantry.  Sgt. 

1st  Lieut.   Harry   L.    Smith,    13th   Mach.  Gun       Sgt. 

Bat.  Sgt. 

1st  Lieut.  Horace  R.  Tune,  61st  Inf.  Sgt. 

2nd  Lieut.  Leo  G.  Clarke,  llth  Inf.  Sgt. 

2nd  Lieut.  John  B.  Crone,  60th  Inf.  Sgt. 


Lieut.  Paul  J.  Drasigroch,  6th  Inf. 
Lieut.  Carlos  J.   Lively,  60th  Inf. 
Lieut.  John  W.  O'Daniel,  llth  Inf. 
Lieut.  Oakley  L.   Parkhill,  61st  Inf. 
Lieut.  James  A.  Sewell,  60th  Inf. 
Lieut.  Barney  S.  Shepard,  llth  Inf. 
Jack  Bennett,  llth  Inf. 
Stanley   Bevan,   15th   Mach.   Bun   Bat. 
Earl  Billingsley,  filst  Inf. 
Vincil  Brown,  60tli  Inf. 
Clark   Butterfield,   13th   Mach.   Gun   Bat. 
Anthony  Chirafisi,   llth   Inf. 
George'L.  Ellis,  llth  Inf. 


320  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

CROIX   DE  GUERRE,   WITH   STAR    (FRENCH)— Co/ttrnwed 

Sgt.  Bruce  Epley,  6th  Inf.  Mec.  Charles  Brison,  60th  Inf. 

Sgt.  Lloyd  L.  Ferguson,  llth  Inf.  Mec.  Ludwig  Genrich,  60th  Inf. 

Sgt.  Patrick  P.  Higgins,  7th  Eng.  Pvt.  1st  CI.  Oscar  E.  Johnson,  61st  Inf. 

Sgt.  Charley  Howard,  6th  Inf.  Pvt.  1st  CI.  Kiraon   Karelis,  15th  Mach.  Gun 

Sgt.  Huhcrt  C.  Morris,  61st  Inf.  Bat. 

Sgt.  Russell  Oke,  61st  Inf.  Pvt.  1st  CI.  Manuel   Olson,   13th   Mach.   Gun 

Sgt.  Olex  Phillis,  llth  Inf.  Bat. 

Sgt.  Otis  C.  Scobey,  7th  Eng.  Pvt.  1st  CI.  Wade  C.  Wales,  13th  Mach.  Gun 

Sgt.  Fred  F.  Spivey,  6th  Inf.  Bat. 

Sgt.  Alexander  Stoker,  6th  Inf.  Pvt.  1st  CI.  John   Zlotnikoff,  60th   Inf. 

Sgt.  AUie  Swaggerty,  60th  Inf.  Pvt.  Russell  K.  Adair,  6th  Inf. 

Sgt.  Eugene  P.  Walker,  7th  Eng.  Pvt.  Clarence  Awbrey,  6th  Inf. 

Sgt.  Lockwood  Williams,  60th  Inf.  Pvt.  William  A.  Black,  6th  Inf. 

Sgt.  Edward  S.  Willis,  1.5th  Mach.  Gun  Bat.       Pvt.  Lester  Brown,  llth   Inf. 

Cpl.  Francis  Ackley,  60th  Inf.  Pvt.  Raymond  Harrell,  llth  Inf. 

Cpl.  Ernest  A.  Carlson,  9th  Fd.  Sig.  Bat.  Pvt.  John  Hoggle,  7th  Eng. 

Cpl.  Thomas  Cassoway,  6th  Inf.  Pvt.  Irwin  B.  Horn,  7th  Eng. 

Cpl.  Robert  E.  Crawford,  7th  Eng.  Pvt.  Angelo  Juliano,  60th  Inf. 

Cpl.  Roliert  HUI,  61st  Inf.  Pvt.  Roland  D.  Lynch,  6th  Inf. 

Cpl.  John  K.  Irons,  llth  Inf.  Pvt.  John   Mitchell,  60th   Inf. 

Cpl.  Charles  D.  Rounds,  60th  Inf.  Pvt.  Wayne  Mounts,  15th  Mach.  Gun  Bat. 

Cpl.  Hyman  Silverman,  60th  Inf.  Pvt.  Alexander  Scandel,  60th  Inf. 

Cpl.  Greene  Strothers,  llth  Inf.  Pvt.  Mody  A.  Weeks,  7th  Eng. 

Cpl.  Joseph  B.  Waters,  llth  Inf.  Pvt.  Gregory  Wygast,  15th  Mach.  Gun   Bat. 

ORDRE  DE  CROWN  CHEVALIER  (BELGIAN) 
Capt.  Frank  O.  Mercer,  7th  Eng. 

DECORATION  MILITAIRE   (BELGIAN) 
Cpl.  Harold  Webster,  15th  Mach.  Gun  Bat.         Pvt.  Joseph  B.  Waters,  llth  Inf. 

CROIX  DE  GUERRE   (BELGIAN) 
Sgt.  Bruce  Epley,  6th  Inf.  Pvt.  Ira  Hardin,  6th  Inf. 

Sgt.  Elda  L.  Phipps,  6th  Inf.  Pvt.  Rc.xford   K.  Walker,  61st  Inf. 

Cpl.  Fred  Henderson,  61st  Inf. 

ITALIAN  ARMY  DECORATIONS 

Maj.  Alexander  N.  Stark,  61st  Inf.  Pvt.  William  Berry,  61st  Inf. 

Sgt.  C.  H.  Hicks,  6th  Inf.  Pvt.  Jesse  L.  Cline,  61st  Inf. 

CpL  R.  Scheetz,  19th  Fd.  Art.  Pvt.  James  Gottschalk,  15th  Mach.  Gun  Bat. 

Cpl.  Fred  Henderson,  61st  Inf.  Pvt.  H.  Rust,  61st  Inf. 

Cpl.  Tom  Silver,  llth  Inf.  Pvt.  Joseph  Thornton,  llth  Inf. 

Cpl.  Theodore  J.  DeCarl,  60th  Inf.  Pvt.  Arthur  J.  Young,  6th  Inf. 
Pvt.  Edd  Belk,  60th  Inf. 

SUMMARY 

Medals  of  Honor 2 

Distinguished    Service   Medals 9 

Distinguished   Service   Crosses 198 

G.   H.   Q.   Citations 6 

Commander  of  Legion  of  Honor  (French) 1 

Officers  of  Legion  of  Honor  (French) 3 

Chevaliers  of  Legion  of  Honor   (French) 13 

Medailles    Militaires    (French) 6 

Croix  de  Guerre,  with  Palm  (Frencli) 23 

Croix  de  Guerre,  with  Star   (French) 69 

Ordre  de  Crown   Chevalier    (Belgian) 1 

Decorations  Militaires   (Belgian) 2 

Croix  de  Guerre    ( Belgian ) 5 

Italian    Crosses 13 


Fifth  Division  Citations  321 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 

AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES, 

A.  P.  O.  No.  745. 

GENERAL   ORDERS, 
No.  11. 

The  Division  Commander  takes  great  pleasure  in  publisliing  the  following  letter  from  the 
Commander-in-Chief: 

"AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES, 
OFFICE  OF  THE  COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. 

France,  April  30,  1919. 
Majoe  Genebai.  Hanson  E.  Elt, 
Commanding  5th  Division, 
American  E.  F. 

Mt  Deab  General  Ely: 

It  is  a  pleasant  duty  for  me  to  congratulate  you  and  through  you  the  officers  and  men 
of  the  5th  Division  on  the  inspection  and  review  held  at  Esch  on  April  30th.  The  smart 
appearance  of  all  ranks,  as  well  as  the  fine  shape  in  which  I  found  your  horse  transport,  are 
signs  of  the  high  morale  which  permeates  your  division  and  the  individual  pride  which  each 
man  takes  in  your  splendid  fighting  record. 

Arriving  in  England  towards  the  end  of  April,  1918,  it  was  sent  at  once  to  the  area  near 
Bar-sur-Aube  for  its  regular  course  of  training.  After  one  month  it  was  hurried  into  the 
quiet  Anould  sector  on  the  Vosges  front,  where  it  continued  its  training  until  the  middle  of 
July.  The  Commanding  General  of  the  division  at  that  time  took  command  of  the  St.  Die 
sector  on  the  same  front.  Toward  the  end  of  August  the  division  joined  the  1st  Army  and  on 
September  11th  it  played  its  part  in  the  successful  St.  Mihiel  offensive.  The  attack  was  con- 
tinued until  September  14th,  during  which  time  severe  fighting  was  had  in  the  Bois-de- 
Bonvaux  and  the  Bois-de-Grand-Fontaine,  which  will  always  be  names  to  be  remembered  by 
the  division.  Relieved  from  the  line  on  September  16th,  after  a  total  advance  of  about  7  kilo- 
meters, the  division  rested  until  Octol)er  12th,  wlien  it  was  thrown  into  the  Meuse-Argonne 
offensive.  It  remained  in  this  attack  for  ten  days  under  constant  machine  gun  and  heavy 
artillery  fire  from  the  eastern  heights  of  the  Meuse,  capturing  the  Bois-de-la-Pultiere  and  the 
Bois-des-Rappes.  On  October  23rd  the  division  was  relieved  from  the  battle.  Four  days  later 
it  returned  to  the  attack  remaining  in  the  battle  until  the  cessation  of  hositilities  on  November 
11th.  During  this  time  it  captured,  among  other  places,  Aincreville,  Mouzay  and  Vilosnes, 
advancing  21  kilometers  into  the  enemy's  line.  The  feat  of  arms,  however,  which  marks  espe- 
cially the  division's  ability  as  a  fighting  unit,  was  the  crossing  of  the  Meuse  River  and  the 
establisliment  of  a  bridgehead  on  the  eastern  bank.  This  operation  was  one  of  the  most 
brilliant  military  feats  in  the  history  of  the  American  Army  in  France. 

Since  the  armistice  the  division  has  formed  a  portion  of  the  Army  of  Occupation,  and  in 
its  conduct  under  difficult  conditions  there,  I  take  especial  pride.  Every  man  can  rest  assured 
of  the  gratitude  of  the  American  people  for  his  share  in  the  final  victory,  of  my  appreciation 
of  his  achievements,  and  of  the  deep  interest  which  I  shall  take  in  the  future  of  all  ranks. 

Sincerely  yours, 

John  J.  Pershino." 


By  command  of  Major  General  Ely: 


Official: 

DAvm  P.  Wood, 

Lieut.  Colonel,  Infantry, 
Division  Adjutant. 


C.   A.  Thott, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


322  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 

AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES, 

A.  P.  O.  No.  745 

May  20th,   1919. 
GENERAL    ORDERS, 
No.  12. 

The  Divi.sion  Commander  takes  great  plea.su re  and  satisfaction  in  publishing  the  following 
letter  from  the  Chief  of  StaiT,  3rd  Army: 

HEADQUARTERS  THIRD   ARMY, 

AMERICAN   EXPEDri'IONAKY  FORCES, 

GEKM.VNY. 

May   16th,  1919. 

From:    The  Chief  of  Staff,  3rd  Army. 

To:   The  Commanding  General,  5th  Division. 

Subject:    Apjireciation  of  Services  of  the  Division. 

The  Army  Connuander  wishes  to  express  to  the  Commanding  General,  the  officers  and 
men  of  the  5th  Division  his  appreciation  of  the  services  of  the  Division  during  war. 

After  an  occupancy  of  a  defensive  .sector  in  the  Vosges,  you  participated  in  the  St.  Mihiel 
offensive,  where  you  attained  your  objectives  with  that  characteristic  .\merican  dash.  In  the 
Meuse-Argonne  oj)eration,  your  crossing  of  the  Meuse  was  one  of  the  brilliant  exploits  of 
the  war. 

As  one  of  the  divisions  forming  the  Army  of  Occupation,  you  have  rendered  most  valuable 
services  in  maintaining  order,  in  spite  of  the  delicacy  of  the  situation,  amongst  the  people  of 
the  Grand  Duchy  of  Luxembourg,  liberated  from  four  years  of  German  occupation.  In  the 
performance  of  this  duty,  as  in  the  deportment  of  your  officers  and  men,  you  have  in  every 
way  met  the  expectation  of  the  Army  Commander  and  reflected  great  credit  upon  the  service. 


By  eomniand  of  Lieutenant  General  Liggett: 


By  coMunand  of  Major  General   Ely: 


Official: 

D.wiD  P.  Woon, 

Lieut.  Colonel,  Infantry, 
Division  Adjutant. 


George   Ghuneht, 

Acting  Chief  of  Staff." 


C.   A.   Trott, 

Chief   of   Staff. 


Fifth  Division  Citations  323 

REPUBLIQUE  FRANCAISE. 

Paris  le  10  juillet,  1919. 

Le  President  du  Conseil, 

Ministre  de  la  Guerre, 
6  I.  P. 

Monitieur  le  General  Cotnmaiutant  la  5°  Divisluti  d'  Jnfanterie  Amcrlcahie. 
MoN  CHEE  General: 

Au  moment  ou  votre  division  s'apprete  a  quitter  la  France,  je  suis  heurcux  de  vous 
addresser  les  felicitations  et  les  vous  du  Government  de  la  Kepublique. 

La  5°  Division  arrivee  dans  notre  pays  au  printemps  de  1918  a  fait  ses  premieres  armes 
cote  a  cote  avec  des  troupes  francaises  dan  les  Vosges.  EUe  a  pris  a'l'offensive  de  St.  Mihiel 
umc  part  plorieuse  et  dans  la  bataille  qui  s'est  deroulee  entre  I'Argonner  et  la  Meuse,  elle  a 
fait  preuvc  du  ])lus  bel  esprit  de  sacrifice,  et  d"un  elan  que  rien  ne  put  arreter.  Atteignant  la 
Meuse  entre  Brieulles  et  Dun,  elle  frandiit  hardiment  le  fleuve  et  Tarmistice  seal  mit  un 
terme  a  son  avance. 

Le  souvenir  de  vos  exploits  .sera  precieusement  conserve  parnii  nous.  Nous  unissons 
dans  une  meme  pensee  de  reconnaissance  le  vivants  et  les  morts,  et  nous  esperons  que,  de 
retour  dans  leurs  foyers,  vos  soldats  n'oulilieront  pas  la  terre  de  France  ou  ils  combattirent 
si  vaillainent  pour  la  liberte. 

Agreez,  Mon  cher  General,  1'  assurance  de  mes  tres  devoues  sentiments. 

Pour  le  President  du  Con.seil  et  par  son  ordre: 

Le  Commissaire  General  aus  affaires  de  guerre  franco-americaines. 

(Signed)      Andre  T.\rdieu. 


(Translation) 

FRENCH  REPUBLIC. 

Paris,  July   10th,   1919. 

The   President  of  the  Council 
Minister  of  War. 

The  General  Cow nuiniliiiff  the  Fifth  .1  merirnn  Jnfantrij  Dwution. 
My  De.4H  General: 

At  the  moment  when  your  division  is  making  ready  to  leave  France  I  am  happy  to 
address  to  you  the  congratulations  and  good  wishes  of  the  Government  of  the  Republic. 

The  Fifth  Division,  having  arrived  in  our  country  in  the  Spring  of  1918,  went  into  action 
for  the  first  time  side  by  side  with  French  troops  in  the  Vosges.  It  took  a  glorious  part  in 
the  St.  Mihiel  offensive,  and  in  the  battle  which  developed  between  the  Argonne  and  the 
Meuse  it  gave  proof  of  the  finest  spirit  of  sacrifice  and  of  a  power  which  nothing  could 
arrest.  Reaching  the  Meuse  between  Brieulles  and  Dun  it  boldly  crossed  the  river  and  the 
armistice  alone  put  a  stop  to  its  advance. 

The  memory  of  your  exploits  will  remain  for  us  a  precious  pos.session.  We  unite  in  the 
same  .sentiment  of  gratittide  the  living  and  the  dead,  and  we  hope  that  when  they  have 
returned  to  their  homes  your  soldiers  will  not  forget  the  soil  of  France  where  they  fought  so 
valiantly  for  liberty. 

Accept,  by  dear  General,  the  assurance  of  my  sincere  devotion. 

For  the  President  of  the  Council  and  by  his  order: 

The  Commissioner  General  for  Franco-American  War  Affairs: 

(Signed)     Andee  Taedieu. 


324 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES, 


Fbance,  December  26,   1918. 


GENERAL    ORDERS, 
No.  238. 


It  is  with  soldierly  pride  tliat  I  record  in  General  Orders  a  tribute  to  the  taking  of  the 
St.  Mihiel  salient  by  tlie  First  Army. 

On  September  12,  1918,  you  delivered  the  first  concerted  offensive  operation  of  the 
American  E.xpeditionary  Forces  upon  difficult  terrain  against  this  redoubtable  position,  im- 
movably held  for  four  years,  wliicli  crumpled  before  your  ably  executed  advance.  Within 
twenty-four  hours  of  the  commencement  of  the  attack  the  salient  had  ceased  to  exist,  and  you 
were  threatening  Metz. 

Your  divisions,  which  had  never  been  tried  in  the  exacting  conditions  of  major  offensive 
operations,  worthily  emulated  those  of  more  arduous  experience  and  earned  their  right  to 
participate  in  the  more  difficult  task  to  come.  Your  staff  and  auxiliary  services,  which  labored 
so  untiringly  and  so  enthusiastically,  deserve  equal  commendation,  and  we  are  indebted  to  the 
willing  co-operation  of  veteran  French  divisions  and  of  auxiliary  units  which  the  AUied  com- 
mands put  at  our  disposal. 

Not  only  did  you  straighten  a  dangerous  salient,  capture  16,000  prisoners,  443  guns  and 
liberate  240  square  miles  of  French  territory,  but  you  demonstrated  the  fitness  for  battle  of  a 
luiified  American  Army. 

We  appreciate  the  loyal  training  and  effort  of  the  First  Army.  In  the  name  of  our 
country,  I  offer  our  hearty  and  unmeasured  thanks  to  those  splendid  Americans  of  the  1st, 
4th  and  5th  Corps  and  the  1st,  2nd,  4th,  5th,  26th,  42nd,  82nd,  89th  and  90th  Divisions,  which 
were  engaged,  and  of  the  3rd,  35th,  78th,  80th  and  91st  Divisions,  which  were  in  reserve. 


By  command  of  General  Pershing: 


James  W.  McAndrew, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


Official: 


ROBEBT  C.  DaTIS, 

Adjutant  General. 


Fifth  Division  Citations  325 

GENERAL  HEADQUARTERS, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES, 

Fkance,  December   19,   1918. 
GENERAL   ORDERS. 

No.  232. 

It  is  with  a  sense  of  gratitude  for  its  splendid  accomplishment,  which  will  live  through  all 
history,  that  I  record  in  General  Orders  a  tribute  to  the  victory  of  the  First  Army  in  the 
Meuse-Argonne  battle. 

Tested  and  strengthened  by  the  reduction  of  the  St.  Mihiel  salient,  for  more  than  six 
weeks  you  battered  against  the  pivot  of  tiie  enemy  line  on  the  western  front.  It  was  a  position 
of  imposing  natural  strength,  stretching  on  both  sides  of  the  Meuse  River  from  the  bitterly 
contested  hills  of  Verdun  to  the  almost  impenetrable  forest  of  the  Argonne;  a  position, 
moreover,  fortified  by  four  years  of  labor  designed  to  render  it  impregnable;  a  position  held 
with  the  fullest  resources  of  the  enemy.  That  position  you  broke  utterly,  and  thereby  hastened 
the  collapse  of  the  enemy's  military  power. 

Soldiers  of  all  of  the  divisions  engaged  under  the  First,  Third  and  Fifth  American  Corps 
and  the  Second  Colonial  and  Seventeenth  French  Corps,  the  1st,  2nd,  3rd,  4th,  5th,  26th,  28th, 
29th,  32nd,  33rd,  35th,  37th,  42nd,  77th,  78th,  79th,  80th,  81st,  82nd,  89th,  90th  and  91st  Ameri- 
can divisions,  the  18th  and  2Gth  French  Divisions,  and  the  10th  and  15th  French  Colonial 
divisions- — you  will  long  be  remembered  for  the  stubborn  persistence  of  your  progress,  your 
storming  of  obstinately  defended  machine  gun  nests,  your  penetration,  yard  by  yard,  of 
woods  and  ravines,  your  heroic  resistance  in  the  face  of  counterattacks  supported  by  power- 
ful artillery  fire.  For  more  than  a  month,  from  the  initial  attack  of  September  2()th,  you 
fought  your  way  slowly  through  the  Argonne,  through  the  woods  and  over  hills  west  of  the 
Meuse;  you  slowly  enlarged  your  hold  on  the  Cotes  de  Meuse  to  the  east,  and  then,  on  the  1st 
of  November,  your  attack  forced  the  enemy  into  flight.  Pressing  his  retreat,  you  cleared  the 
entire  left  bank  of  the  Meuse  south  of  Sedan,  and  then  stormed  the  heights  on  the  right  bank 
and  drove  him  into  the  plain  beyond. 

Soldiers  of  all  army  and  corps  troops  engaged,  to  you  no  less  credit  is  due;  your  stead- 
fast adherence  to  duty  and  your  dogged  determination  in  the  face  of  all  obstacles  made  pos- 
sible the  heroic  deeds  cited  above. 

The  acliievement  of  the  First  Army,  which  is  scarcely  to  be  equalled  in  American  history, 
must  remain  a  source  of  proud  satisfaction  to  the  troops  who  participated  in  the  last  cam- 
paign of  the  war.  The  American  people  will  remember  it  as  the  realization  of  the  hitherto 
potential  strength  of  the  American  contribution  toward  the  cause  to  which  they  had  sworn 
allegiance.    There  can  be  no  greater  reward  for  a  soldier  or  for  a  soldier's  memory. 

John  J.  Pebshiko, 
General,  Commander-in-Chief,  American  Expeditionary  Forces. 

Official: 

Robert  C.  Davis, 

Adjutant  General 

With  the  Armies,  July  3,  1918. 
33rd  Army  Corps,  21st  Division,  Postal  Sector  82. 

No.  4860. 

General  Dauvin,  Commanding  the  21st  Division. 

To  General  McMahon, 

Commanding  the  5th  Division. 

Now  that  the  9th  American  Brigade  is  about  to  be  relieved  to  commence  instruction,  it 
affords  me  pleasure  to  advise  you  that  this  brigade  had  made  a  very  good  impression  of  its 
attitude,  its  dash,  its  warlike  spirit  and  the  excellent  relation  of  comradeship  which  it  has 
maintained  with  the  French  troops. 

I  would  appreciate  if  you  would  extend  my  compliments  to  the  Commanding  General,  9th 
Brigade,  and  to  his  unit  commanders. 

(Signed)     Dauvin-. 


326  Historij  of  the  Fifth  Dhmion 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  U.  No,  7+5,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 

August  19,  1918. 

GENERAL  ORDERS,  ' 

No.  4.3. 

The  following  translation  of  a  letter  just  received  by  the  Commanding  General  is  pub- 
lished for  the  information  of  the  entire  command: 

Ar.mv  Headqu.^btebs, 

.August   18,  1918. 

"Seventii  Army,  Gener.\l  Staff,  Section  Three, 

No.  87/3  U.  S. 

From  Cieneral  de  Boissoudy,  Commanding  the  Seventh  .-\rmy. 

To  THE  Commanding  General, 
Fifth  Division,  U.  S. 

The  American  Fifth  Division  carried  out  yesterday  its  first  operation  of  war. 

It  penetrated  far  into  the  enemy  defenses,  quickly  attained  its  objectives,  and  holds  them 
securely. 

I  extend  my  sincerest  congratulations  to  you  |H'rsonally  for  the  manner  in  which  the 
operation  was  planned  and  staged, 

I  request  you  to  congratulate  for  me  the  troops  who  participated  in  the  attack. 

This  operation  is  a  fitting  farewell  from  the  gallant  Fifth  Division  to  its  French  com- 
rades before  its  departure. 


By   command   of   Major  General   McMalion; 


Official: 

David  I'.  Wood, 

Major  of  Infantry, 

Division  Adjutant. 


(Signed)      de    Boissocdt." 

C.  A.  Trott, 

Colonel,  General  Staff, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


Fifth  Division  Citations 


327 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  715,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


GENERAL    ORDERS, 

No.  44. 


August  24,  1918. 


1.  The  Division  Commander  desires  to  express  his  deep  appreciation  of  the  courage,  dasli 
and  fortitude  shown  by  the  officers  and  men  engaged  in  the  attack  on  the  Frapelle  position 
and  the  subsequent  occupation  of  the  line.  All  ranks  engaged  gave  evidence  of  a  soldierly 
bearing  which  augurs  well  for  the  future  success  of  the  division  when  engaged  in  more  im- 
portant operations. 

Whatever  credit  may  be  attributed  to  the  higlier  command  for  the  success  of  the  opera- 
tion rightfully  belongs  to  Brigadier  General  W.  H.  Gordon,  commanding  the  Tenth  Brigade, 
who  was  in  direct  charge  of  the  preparation  and  execution  of  the  attack. 

2.  Indivichial  acts  of  courage  and  gallantry  will  be  pul)li.shed  to  the  command  in  later 
orders. 


By  command  (jf  Major  General  McMahon: 


C.  A.  Tbott, 

Colonel,  General  Staff, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


Official: 


Davh)  p.  Wood, 

Major  of  Infantry, 

Division  Adjutant. 


328  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH   DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  745,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 

August  24,  1918. 
GENERAL    ORDERS, 

No.  45. 

The  following  tr;insI;ition  of  a  letter  received  by  tlie  Coiuiiiaiuling  General  i.s  publi.slied  for 
the  information  of  tlie  entire  eoniniand: 

Headcjuabtees, 
•      '  Augu.st  22,  1918. 

"ThirIt-tiiibd  Army  Corps,  Genehai.  Staff,  Section  One, 
No.  4598/1. 

From  General  LeConte,  Commanding  the  Thirty-third  Army  Corps   (French). 

To  General  McMahon, 

Commanding  the   Fifth   Division,   U.   S. 

Now  that  the  gallant  division  which  you  command  is  leaving  the  Gerardmer  sector,  where 
it  arrived  nearly  three  months  ago,  I  express  my  ])rofound  gratitude  for  the  ever  loyal  support 
that  your  troojis  and  you  have  given  us  in  the  role  which  we  are  entrusted  to  play  for  the 
time  l)eing  on  the  Vosges  front. 

A  few  days  ago,  in  a  local  operation  which  was  jierfeetly  conceived  and  energetically 
conducted  and  whose  ol).iectives  were  accomplished  despite  violent  and  prolonged  counter 
activity  of  the  enemy,  your  regiments  and  you  have  ])r(>ved  what  mettle  higher  authority 
may  expect  to  find  in  you,  perhaps  within  a  sliort  period. 

I  wish  also  to  call  particular  attention  to  the  aifecting  cordiality  that  has  at  all  times 
characterized  tlie  daily  intercourse  of  tlie  staffs  and  troops  of  the  Fifth  Division  and  the 
Thirty-third  Army  Corjis.  This  ever-present  cordiality  had  enaliled  us  completely  to  over- 
come the  difticulties  that  inevitably  result  from  differences  in  organization  and  language.  We 
are  marching  together  towards  our  goal  in  complete  agreement  of  sentiment  and  thought  that 
will  facilitate  and  as.sure  our  arrival  there. 

It  is  in  this  spirit  that  I  request  you  to  inform  the  officers  and  troops  under  your  com- 
mand of  my  entire  satisfaction  with  them  and  to  express  to  them  with  my  thanks  all  my  good 
wishes  for  their  prosperity  and  glory." 

(Signed)     Leconte." 
By  coMMM.iiid  of  .Major  General  McMahon: 

C.  A.  Trott, 

Colonel,  General  Staff, 

Chief  of  Staff. 

Official: 

Daviij  p.  VV'oon, 

Majiir  of  Infantry. 

Division  .\djutant. 


Fifth  Division  Citations 


329 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  745,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


September  13,  1918. 


GENERAL   ORDERS, 
No.  51. 


The  following  message  received  from  the  C'<immanding  General,  1st  Army  Corps,  is  re- 
peated for  the  information  of  all  concerned: 

"To  Commanding  General,  Fifth  Division:  Congratulate  sincerely  tlie  Fifth  Division  on 
its  splendid  achievement  today  and  desire  to  express  my  pride  and  gratification  in  having  such 
a  splendid  unit  under  my  command.      (Sgd.)    Liggett." 

The  Division  Commander  also  desires  to  express  his  deep  appreciation  of  the  splendid 
spirit  which  has  animated  the  entire  division  during  the  recent  operations.  Only  a  well- 
disciplined  command,  inspired  liy  excellent  morale,  could  have  undergone  so  cheerfully  the 
severe  conditions  of  service  and  weather  and  have  carried  out  with  such  splendid  spirit  in 
battle  the  orders  of  the  Corps  Commander. 

It  is  to  be  distinctly  understood  that  this  ex))ression  of  appreciation  is  intended  not  only 
for  the  coml)atant  troops  of  the  division,  l)ut  also  for  those  whose  untiring  efforts  under  trying 
conditions  of  traffic  and  weather  made  po.ssilile  the  forwarding  of  supplies  and  the  evacuation 
and  care  of  the  wounded. 


IJy  command  of  Major  General  McMahon: 


Official: 

D.4vn)  P.  Wood, 

Lieut.  Colonel  of  Infantry, 
Division  Adjutant. 


A.  Thott, 
Colonel,  General  Staff, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


330  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


SIGNAL  CORPS,  UNITED  STATES  ARMY  TELEGRAM. 

Received  at  Hq.  1st  Armj'  Corps,  September  15,  1918. 

Office  of  the  C.  in  C,  A.  E.  F.,  September  15,  1918. 

Majob  Gexeral  Hunter  Liggett, 

Commanding  First  Army  Corps,  France. 

Please  accept  my  sincere  congratulations  on  the  successful  and  important  part  taken  by 
the  officers  and  men  of  the  First  Corps  in  the  first  offensive  of  tlie  American  (First)  Army  on 
Septemlicr  l'2th  and  13th.  The  courageous  dash  and  vigor  of  our  troops  has  thrilled  our 
countrymen  and  evoked  the  enthusiasm  of  our  Allies.  Please  convey  to  your  command  my 
heartfelt  appreciation  of  their  splendid  work.     I  am  proud  of  you  all. 

Pershing. 
7:30  P.  M. 

Hq.  1st  Army  Corps,  American  E.  F.,  16  Sept.,  1918. — Official  copy,  furnished  for  the 
information  of  all  concerned. 


By  command  of  Major  General  Liggett: 


W.  A.  Ha\'erfieu), 
Major,  N.  A.. 

Adjutant. 


SIGNAL  CORPS,  UNITED  STATES  ARMY  TELEGRAM. 

Received  at  26  GYK  119  OB. 

Waterfall,  September  15,  1918. 
Commanding  General,  First  Corps. 

Number  105,  Sec.  G.  S.  The  Army  Commander  directs  that  the  following  message  from 
the  President  of  the  United  States  be  transmitted  to  you  for  transmission  to  local  troops  of 
your  command: 

"Washington,  Sept.  14.  To  General  John  J.  Pershing,  .American  Expeditionary  Forces, 
France.  Accept  my  warmest  congratulations  on  the  brilliant  achievements  of  the  army  under 
your  command.  The  boys  have  done  what  we  expected  of  them  and  done  it  the  way  we  most 
admire.  We  are  deeply  proud  of  them  and  of  their  chief.  Please  convey  to  all  concerned  my 
grateful  and  affectionate  thanks. 

(Signed)     Woodhow  Wilson." 
Drum,  10:26  P.  M. 

Hq.  1st  Army  Corps,  American  E.  F.,  20  September,  1918.— Official  copy  furnished. 

1.  For  the  information  of  all  concerned. 

By  command  of  Major  General  Liggett: 

W.  A.  Havebfield, 

Major,  N.  A., 

Adjutant. 


Fifth  Division  Citations  331 


SIGNAL  COUPS,  UNITED  STATES  ARMY  TELEGRAM. 

Received  at  2  GYCX  102  OB. 

Wateri'ali,,  September   14-15,   1918. 
Commanding  General,  First  Corps. 

No.  101,  Sec.  G.  S.  The  Commander-in-Chief  is  pleased  to  transmit  to  the  command  the 
following  telegram,  which  he  has  just  received: 

"My  dear  General:  Tlie  First  American  Army,  under  your  command,  on  this  first  day 
has  won  a  magnificent  victory  Ijy  a  maneuver  as  sliillfuUy  prepared  as  it  was  valiantly 
executed.  I  extend  to  you,  as  well  as  to  tiie  officers  and  troops  under  your  command,  my 
warmest  compliments.    Marshal  Foch." 

The  Army  Commander  directs  that  the  foregoing  telegram  he  distributed  to  the  forces 
of  your  command. 

Drum. 

Hq.  1st  Army  Corps,  American  E.  F.,  15  Sept.,  1918. — Official  copy  furnished  for  the 
information  of  aU  concerned. 


By  command  of  Major  General  Liggett: 


W.  A.  Havebfield, 
Major,  N.  A., 

Adjutant. 


SIGNAL  CORPS,  UNITED  STATES  ARMY  TELEGRAM. 

Received  at  37  Gy  K  AN  64  OB.    Hdqrs.,  First  Army,  9/17/18. 

Commanding  General,  First  Corps,  Wakefield. 

The  Coramander-in-Chief  is  pleased  to  transmit  to  the  command  the  following  telegram, 
which  he  has  received: 

"General  Persliing,  Headquarters,  .\merican  Expeditionary  Forces.  All  ranivs  of  tlie 
British  Army  in  France  welcome  with  unbounded  admiration  and  pleasure  the  victory  which 
has  attended  the  initial  offensive  of  the  great  American  Army  under  your  personal  command. 
I  beg  you  to  accept  and  to  convey  to  all  ranks  my  best  congratulations  and  those  of  all  ranks 
of  the  British  Armies  under  my  command.     Haig." 

H.  A.  Drum, 

Chief  of  Staff. 
12:10  A.  M. 

Hq.  1st  Army  Corps,  .'Vmerican  E.  F.,  20  Sept.,  1918. — Official  copy  furnished  all  con- 
cerned. 


By  command  of  Major  General  Liggett: 


W.  A.  Haverfield, 
Major,  N.  A., 

Adjutant. 


332  History  of  tlic  Fifth  Division 


HEADQUAHTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  745,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


October  30th,  1918. 


GENERAL  ORDERS, 
No.  68. 


The  Divisitin  Commander  desires  to  express  his  great  pleasure  in  publishing  the  following 
expressions  of  conuuendation  uf  this  divisi(jn  by  the  Army  Corps  Conmiander: 

•'HEADQUARTERS  FIRST  ARMY, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


October  26,   1918. 


Office  of  thf.  Chief  of  Staff. 

From:   Chief  of  Staff. 

To:  Commanding  General,  3rd  Corps,  American  E.  F. 

Subject:    Commendation  of  recent  success  of  5th  Division. 

The  Army  Commander  directs  that  you  convey  to  the  Commanding  General,  ofiBcers  and 
men  of  the  5th  Division  his  appreciation  of  their  persistency  and  success  in  improving  the  line 
held  by  this  division  by  clearing  the  Bois  des  Rappes  of  the  enemy. 

H.  A.  Drum, 

Chief  of  Staff. 

1st  Ind. 

Hdqrs.  3rd  Army  Corps,  A.  P.  O.  No.  754,  A.  E.  F.,  Oct.  29th,  1918. 

To  Commandng  General,  5th  Division,  .\merican  E.  F. 

1.  The  difficulties  under  which  the  Third  Corps  has  labored  to  improve  its  position  have 
been  numerous  and  great  and  the  part  the  5th  Division  took  in  estalilishing  the  present 
advantageous  jiosition  of  this  cor])s  is  deejily  appreciated  by  the  Cor])s  Commander,  and  he 
adds  his  congratulations  to  those  of  the  Commanding  General  of  the  .\rmy  for  the  vigorous  and 
untiring  efforts  of  the  jiersonnel  thereof,  whose  resolution  and  fortitude  are  worthy  of  the  best 
traditions  of  the  American  Army. 

J.    L.   HiNES, 

Major  General,  U.  S.  A., 
Commanding." 


By  command  uf  Major  General  Ely: 


Official: 

David  P.  Wooo, 

Lieut.  Colonel,  Infantry, 
Division  Adjutant. 


C.  A.  Trott, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


Fifth  Division  Citations  333 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  745,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


November  9th,  1918. 


GENERAL   ORDERS, 
No.  71. 


The  Division  Commander  take.s  pleasure  in  publishing  the  following  General  Orders  from 
the  Headquarters  First  Army: 

"HEADQUARTERS  FIRST  ARMY, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 

5  November,  1918. 
Advance  Copy: 

GENERAL    ORDERS. 
No.  31. 

On  November  first,  after  constant  fighting  for  over  one  month,  the  First  American  Army 
launched  an  attack  against  the  German  .\rmy,  which  had  established  itself  for  determined 
resistance.  In  five  days  it  had  penetrated  25  kilometers  and  had  driven  the  enemy  in  retreat 
before  it.  Its  brilliant  success,  in  connection  with  the  advance  of  the  Fourth  French  Army 
on  its  left,  forced  the  Germans  to  retreat  on  a  broad  front  to  the  west. 

It  has  fought  and  marched  and  endured  the  rigors  of  campaign  with  the  most  .superb 
indifference  to  everything  except  the  determination  to  go  forward  and  imprint  upon  the 
enemy  the  marks  of  its  courage  and  resolution. 

.\11  arms  and  services,  those  in  advance  who  smashed  the  way,  those  In  the  air  who  ren- 
dered aggressive  and  efficient  service,  and  those  in  the  rear  who  by  their  untiring  industry 
made  possible  the  continued  advance,  are  worthy  of  the  highest  praise  and  the  gratitude  of 
their  admiring  country. 

The  Army  Commander  is  proud  of  such  an  army,  thanks  it  for  the  splendid  results 
already  achieved,  and  looks  forward  with  confidence  to  the  still  greater  successes  that  lie 
before  it. 


By  command  of  Lieutenant  General  Liggett: 


H.  A.  Drum, 

Cliief  of  Staff. 


Official: 

H.    K.    I/OCOHRY, 

Adjutant  General." 

"HEADQUARTERS  FIRST  ARMY. 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 

6  November,  1918. 
Advance  Copy: 

GENERAL    ORDERS, 
No.  32. 

It  is  with  much  pride  that  the  .\rmy  Commander  publishes  the  following  telegram  re- 
ceived by  the  Commander-in-Chief  from  Marshal  Foch,  and  the  accompanying  expression  of 
gratification  from  the  Commander-in-Chief: 

"The  operations  which  were  begun  on  the  first  of  November  by  the  First  American  Army 
have  already  assured — thanks  to  the  valor  of  the  High  Command  and  the  energy  and  bravery 


334  Histori)  of  the  Fifth  Division 

of  the  troops — results  of  the  greatest  importance.     I  am  happy  to  send  you  my  warmest  con- 
gratulations on  the  success  of  these  ojjerations."' 

The  Commander-in-Chief  adds  to  the  above: 

"In  transmitting  the  above  telegram  from  the  Allied  Commander-in-Chief,  I  desire  to 
express  my  admiration  of  the  past  successes  of  the  officers  and  soldiers  of  the  First 
American  Army  and  my  confidence  that  they  are  yet  to  accomplish  still  greater  deeds." 

By  command  of  Lieutenant  General  Liggett: 

H.  A.  Drum, 

Chief  of  Staff. 
By  command  of  Major  General  Ely: 

C.  A.  Trott, 

Chief  of  Staff. 

Official : 

David  P.  Wood, 

Lieut.  Colonel,  Infantry, 
Division  Adjutant. 


Fifth  Division  Citations  335 


HEADQUARTERS  THIRD  ARMY  CORPS, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCE,  FRANCE. 

November  9tli,  1918. 

GENERAL    ORDERS, 
No.  41. 

The  Corps  Commander  de.sires  to  make  of  record  the  gallant  conduct  of  the  Fifth  Divi.sion 
from  November  1st,  1918,  to  November  5th,  1918,  in  forming,  against  the  enemy  in  jio.sition 
a  crossing  of  the  River  Meuse  near  Dun  and  near  Brieulles,  building  bridges  and  swimming 
the  river  in  the  face  of  the  machine  gun  and  artillery  fire  and  in  advancing  some  nine 
liilometers  in  the  enemy's  territory  to  the  vicinity  of  Brandeville.  This  action  not  only 
uncovered  the  left  flank  of  the  Seventeenth  Franch  Corps  and  enabled  that  corps  to  advance, 
but  broke  the  line  of  resistance  of  the  German  Army  and,  by  turning  its  position  on  tlie 
east  bank  of  the  Meuse,  compelled  its  withdrawal. 

J.    L.    HlNES, 

Major  General,  U.  S.  A., 
Commanding. 

Official: 

David  O'Keefe, 

Adjutant  General. 


HEADQUARTERS  FIRST  ARMY,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY   FORCES, 
OFFICE  OF  THE  CHIEF  OF  STAFF. 

November  10,  1918. 
From:    Chief  of  Staff,  First  Army,  A.  E.  F. 

To:    Commanding  General,  Third  Corps,  A.  E.  F. 

Subject:   Services  of  Third  Corps  in  recent  operations. 

1.  The  Army  Commander  has  noticed  with  great  pleasure  and  appreciation  the  excellent 
work  of  your  Corps  in  crossing  the  Meuse  River  and  clearing  tlie  heights  to  the  east  of  tlie 
town  of  Dun-sur-Meuse.  He  appreciates  fully  the  difficulties  involved  in  this  problem  and 
therefore  realizes  that  the  results  attained  reflect  great  credit  on  your  Corps  and  the  Divisions 
included  therein. 

2.  He  desires  me  to  transmit  the  foregoing  to  you  and  to  request  that  his  appreciation 
be  transmitted  to  the  officers  and  men  of  your  Corps. 

H.  A.  Deum, 

Chief  of  Staff. 

A  true  copy: 

J.  R.  Francis, 

Captain,  Infantry, 

Sec'y,  Gen.  Staff. 


3."56  Historij  of  the  Fifth  Division 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  7+5,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


November  11th,  1918. 


GENERAL  ORDERS, 

No.    73. 


1.  It  is  with  pride  and  pleasure  that  the  Division  Conunander  calls  the  attention  of 
the  division  to  G.  O.  No.  41,  Third  Corps,  of  November  9th,  1918,  wherein  the  Corps  Com- 
mander eites  the  Fifth  Division  for  "Forcing,  against  the  enemy  in  position,  a  crossing  of 
the  River  Meuse  near  Dun  and  near  BrieuUes,  building  bridges  and  swinuning  the  river 
in  the  face  of  machine-gun  and  artillery  fire  and  in  advancing  some  nine  kilometers  in  the 
enemy's  territory  to  the  vicinity  of  Brandeville.  This  action  not  only  uncovered  the  left 
flank  of  the  XVII  French  Corps  and  enabled  that  Corps  to  advance,  but  broke  the  line  of 
resistance  of  the  CJermany  Army,  and,  by  turning  its  position  on  the  east  bank  of  the  Meuse, 
compelled  its  withdrawal";"'  and  a  letter  of  November  11th,  1918,  from  the  Chief  of  Staff, 
First  Army,  A.  E.  F.,  to  the  Commanding  General,  Third  Corps,  A.  E.  F.,  wherein  he  states: 
"The  Army  Commander  has  noticed  with  great  pleasure  and  appreciation  the  excellent  work 
of  your  Corps  in  crossing  the  Meuse  River  and  clearing  the  heights  to  the  east  of  the  town 
of  bun-sur-Mense.  He  appreciates  fully  the  difficulties  involved  in  this  problem  and  there- 
fore realizes  that  the  results  attained  reflect  great  credit  on  your  Corps  and  the  divisions 
included  therein." 

2.  The  Fifth  Division  alone  forced  the  crossing  and  established  the  bridgehead.  It 
was  afterwards  joined  for  a  few  days  by  a  regiment  of  the  Thirty-second  Division.  For 
two  days  and  nights  the  division  held  a  front  of  twenty  kilometers  against  the  enemy  on  its 
front  and  both  flanks.  Not  content  with  this,  it  went  out  of  its  sector  on  the  north  and  took 
the  town  of  Mouzay  and  turned  it  over  to  the  Ninetieth  Division.  On  the  south,  it  went  out 
of  its  sector  and  took  Vilosnes,  enabling  the  French  Division  on  its  right  to  cross  the  river. 

3.  In  the  thirty  days  preceding  the  armistice,  this  division  was  seriously  engaged  under 
shell,  rifle  and  machine-gun  fire  twenty-seven  days.  It  the  past  two  weeks,  no  day  has 
passed  that  some  town,  wood,  or  hill  has  not  been  wrested  from  the  enemy.  In  succession, 
the  following  were  captured:  Bois-des-Rappes,  Aincreville,  Bois-de-Babiemont,  Clery-le- 
Grand,  Clery-le-Petit,  Brieulles,  Doulcon,  Dun-sur-Meuse,  Liny,  range  of  hills  east  of  the 
Meu.se  forming  the  bridgehead,  Vilosnes,  Milly,  Lion,  Murvaux,  Fontaines,  Chateau  Charmois, 
Mouzay,  Brandeville,  Foret  de  Woevre,  Jametz,  Reinoiville,  Louppy.  .'\  penetration  of  twenty 
kilometers  into  the  enemy's  line  was  made,  wresting  from  him  one  hundred  and  ninety  square 
kilometers  of  territory,  and  on  announcement  of  the  armistice,  the  Division  had  a  front  of 
thirteen  kilometers,  being  five  kilometers  in  advance  of  troops  on  its  left  and  two  kilometers 
beyond   troops  on  its  right. 

4.  Thirty-seven  cannon,  four  hundred  and  sixty-one  machine  guns,  and  over  nine  hundred 
prisoners  were  captured.  However,  what  the  Division  Commander  wishes  most  to  congratulate 
the  Division  u])on  is  its  untiring,  uncom)ilaining  tenacity  of  ])urpose  in  its  constant  driving  at 
the  enemy  in  spite  of  fatigue  and  shortage  of  rations,  being  wet  from  swinuuing  the  river 
and  canal,  or  wading  the  swamp  of  the  Foret  de  Woevre.  This  is  a  brilliant  example  of 
what  the  .American  soldier  can  do  in  an  emergency  when  he  nuist  go  on  to  the  utmost  extent 
of  his  power.  The  Division  Commander  is  proud  of  the  work  of  the  Division.  No  division 
could  have  accomplished  more,  and  every  member  of  the  comnumd  should  be  proud  to  belong 
to  a  division  which  has  so  brilliantly  ended  its  record  in  the  greatest  war  the  world  has 
known. 

H.  E.  Ely, 

Major  General,  U.  S.  A., 
Commanding. 


Fifth  Division  Citations  337 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  7i5.  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


November    16th,    1918. 


GENERAL    ORDERS, 
No.    74. 


It  is  with  pride  and  pleasure  that  the  Division  Commander  desires  to  malie  of  record  the 
gallant  conduct  of  the  Tenth  Brigade,  Brigadier  General  Paul  B.  Malone,  Commanding,  to- 
gether with  the  uncomplaining  tenacity  of  purpose  shown  in  the  recent  operations  of  this 
brigade  in  the  difficult  crossing  of  the  Meu.se  under  heavy  artillery  and  machine-gun  fire 
and  the  subsequent  capture  of  Hills  2()0  and  228,  Liny,  the  Bois  de  Chatillon,  .Murvaux,  Fon- 
taines, Vilosnes,  Brandeville,  Jametz,  Remoiville  and   Louppy. 

In  these  uperations  under  the  stress  of  severe  weather  conditions  and  confronted  with 
difficult  natural  obstacles  tenaciously  defended,  the  brigade  forged  on  day  by  day,  cajjturing 
men,  cannon  and  machine  guns,  until  the  armistice  put  an  end  to  its  progress. 

The  Division  Connnander  is  proud  to  have  in  his  command  a  brigade  so  gallantly  and 
ably  led  and  so  forceful  and  dashing  in  attack. 

H.  E.  Ely, 

Major  General,  U.  S.  A., 

Commanding. 


HEADQUARTERS  FIFTH  DIVISION, 
A.  P.  O.  No.  745,  AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


November   17th,  1918. 


GENERAL    ORDERS, 

No.  75. 


It  is  with  pride  and  plea.sure  that  the  Division  Commander  desires  to  make  of  record 
the  gallant  conduct  of  the  Ninth  Brigade,  Brigadier  General  J.  C.  Castner,  Commanding, 
in  crossing  the  Meuse  and  capturing  the  important  positions  and  strongholds  of  Dun-sur- 
Meuse,  Milly,  Lion-dcvant-Dun,  Charmois  Chateau,  Mouzay,  Cote  St.  Germain,  and  the 
Foret  de  Woevre. 

A  spirit  of  fearlessness,  cou])led  with  tactical  leadership,  was  displayed  that  will  ever 
be  a  shining  mark  in  the  annals  of  the  5th  Division. 

For  many  days  the  brigade  battled  against  an  enemy  who  endeavored  tenaciously  to  hold 
positions,  the  terrain  of  which  afforded  every  advantage  of  defense.  L^ndaunted  by  diffi- 
culties of  attack,  the  brigade  pushed  on  under  the  withering  fire  of  machine  guns  and  artillery. 
The  fortitude  and  gallantry  displayed  by  the  entire  lirigade  reflects  the  greatest  credit  upon 
it  and  the  division. 

H.  E.  Ely, 

Major  General,  U.  S.  A., 
CommaDding. 


338  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


GENERAL  HEADQUARTERS, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITU)XARY  FORCES, 


France,  November  12,  1918. 


GENERAL   ORDERS, 

No.  204. 


The  following  communication  from  the  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  Allied  Armies  is 
published  to  the  command: 

G.  Q.  G.  A.,  le  12  November. 
OfiBcers,  Non-Commissioned  Officers,  Soldiers  of  the  Allied  Armies: 

After  having  resolutely  stopped  the  enemy,  you  have  during  these  months,  with  a  faith 
and  energy  unsurpassed,  attacked  without  respite. 

You  have  won  the  greatest  battle  of  history  and  saved  the  most  sacred  cause:  The 
Liberty  of  the  World. 

Be  confident. 

With  glory  immortal  you  have  glorified  your  flags. 

Posterity  holds  for  you  recognition. 

F.  FocH, 
Commander-in-Chief  of  Allied  Armies. 


By  command  of  General  Per.shing: 


Official: 

RoBEET  C.  Davis, 

Adjutant  General. 


James  W.  McAndeew, 

Chief  of  Staff. 


Fifth  Division  Citations 


339 


GENKRAL  HEADQUARTERS, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCES,  FRANCE. 


November  12,  1918. 

GENERAL   ORDERS, 

No.  203. 

The  enemy  has  capitulated.  It  is  fitting  that  I  address  myself  in  thanks  directly  to  the 
officers  and  soldiers  of  the  American  E.xpeditionary  Forces,  wlio  Ijy  their  heroic  efforts  have 
made  possible  this  glorious  result.  Our  armies,  hurriedly  and  hastily  trained,  met  a  veteran 
enemy,  and  by  courage,  discipline  and  sliill  always  defeated  him.  Without  complaint  you 
have  endured  incessant  toil,  privation  and  danger.  You  liave  seen  many  of  your  comrades 
mal<e  the  supreme  sacrifice  that  freedom  may  live.  I  thank  you  for  the  patience  and  courage 
with  which  you  have  endured.  I  congratulate  you  upon  the  splendid  fruits  of  victory  wliich 
your  heroism  and  the  blood  of  our  gallant  dead  are  now  presenting  to  our  nation.  Your  deeds 
will  live  forever  on  tlie  most  glorious  pages  of  .Vmerica's  history. 

Those  tilings  you  have  done.  There  remains  now  a  harder  task  whidi  will  test  your 
soldierly  qualities  to  tlie  utmost.  Succeed  in  this  and  little  note  will  be  taken  and  few  praises 
of  the  past  will  sadly  be  dimmed.  But  you  will  not  fail.  Every  natural  tendency  may  urge 
towards  relaxation  in  discipline,  in  conduct,  in  appearance,  in  everything  that  marks  the 
soldier.  Yet  you  will  remember  that  each  officer  and  each  soldier  is  the  representative  in 
Europe  of  his  people  and  that  his  brilliant  deeds  of  yesterday  permit  no  action  of  today  to 
pass  unnoticed  by  friend  or  by  foe.  Vou  will  meet  this  test  as  gallantly  as  you  have  met 
the  tests  of  the  battlefield.  Sustained  by  your  high  ideals  and  inspired  by  the  heroic  part  you 
have  played,  you  will  carry  back  to  our  people  the  proud  consciousness  of  a  new  Americanism 
born  of  sacrifice.  Whether  you  stand  on  hostile  territory  or  on  the  friendly  soil  of  France, 
you  will  so  bear  yourself  in  discipline,  a])pearance  and  respect  for  all  civil  rights  that  you 
will  confirm  for  all  time  the  pride  and  love  wliich  every  American  feels  for  your  uniform  and 
for  you. 

John  J.  Pershing, 

General,  Commander-in-Chief. 

Official: 

RoBEET  C.  Davis, 

Adjutant  General. 


340  Historij  of  the  Fifth  Division 


GENERAL  HEADQUARTERS, 
AMERICAN  EXPEDITION ARY  FORCES. 


France,    February    28,    1919. 

GENERAL    ORDERS, 
No.  38-A. 

My  Fellow  Soldiers: 

Now  that  your  service  with  the  American  Ex]>e(litionary  Forces  is  about  to  terminate, 
I  can  not  let  you  go  without  a  personal  word.  At  the  call  to  arms,  the  patriotic  young  man- 
hood of  America  eagerly  responded  and  l)ecame  the  formidable  army  whose  decisive  victories 
testify  to  its  etticiency  and  its  valor.  With  the  support  of  the  nation  firmly  united  to  defend 
the  cause  of  liberty,  our  army  has  executed  the  will  of  the  people  with  resolute  purpose.  Our 
democracy  has  been  tested  and  the  forces  of  autocracy  have  been  defeated.  To  the  glory  of 
the  citizen-soldier  our  troops  have  faithfully  fulfdled  their  trust,  and  in  a  succession  of 
brilliant  offensives  have  overcome  the  menace  to  our  civilization. 

As  an  individual,  your  part  in  the  world  war  has  been  an  important  one  in  the  sum  total 
of  our  achievements.  Whether  keejiing  lonely  vigil  in  the  trenches,  or  gallantly  storming 
the  enemy's  stronghold;  whether  enduring  monotonous  drudgery  at  tlic  rear,  or  sustaining 
the  fighting  line  at  the  front,  each  has  bravely  and  efficiently  ))laycd  his  part.  By  willing 
sacrifii'c  of  personal  rights;  by  cheerful  endurance  of  hardships  and  privation;  by  vigor, 
strength  and  indomitable  will,  made  effective  by  thorough  organization  and  cordial  co-opera- 
tion, you  ins])ired  the  war-worn  .Allies  with  new  life  and  turned  the  tide  of  threatened  defeat 
into  overwhelming  victory. 

With  a  consecrated  devotion  to  duty  and  a  will  to  conquer,  you  have  loyally  served  your 
country.  By  your  exemplary  conduct  a  standard  has  been  established  and  maintained  never 
before  attained  by  any  army.  With  mind  and  body  as  clean  and  strong  as  the  decisive  blows 
you  delivered  against  the  foe,  you  are  soon  to  return  to  the  pursuits  of  peace.  In  leaving 
the  scenes  of  your  victories,  may  I  a.sk  that  you  carry  home  your  high  ideals  and  continue 
to  live  as  you  have  .served — an  honor  to  the  principles  for  which  you  have  fought  and  to  the 
fallen  comrades  you  leave  behind. 

It  is  with  pride  in  our  success  that  I  extend  to  you  my  sincere  thanks  for  your  splendid 
service  to  the  army  and  to  the  nation. 

Faithfully, 

John  J.  Pebshino, 

Commander-in-Chief. 

Official : 

Robert  C.  Davis, 

Adjutant  General. 


Advances  and  Square  Kilometers  Gained  341 

ADVANCES  MADE  BY  FIFTH  DIVISION 

Frapelle,   August    17th 1       Km. 

St.  Mihiel,  September  12-17tli 71/3  Km. 

Cunel-Bois  des  Rappes,  October  14-22n(l 3       Km. 

West  Meuse,  October  26th-Novenil)er  +th 51^  Km. 

East   of  Meuse,   November  4-llth 18       Km. 

Total    advance 35       Km. 

SQUARE  KILOMETERS  OF  TERRITORY  CAPTURED  BY  FIFTH  DIVISION 

Frapelle,  August  17th 3  sq.  Km. 

St.  Mihiel,  September   12-17th 21  sq.  Km. 

Cunel-Bois  des  Rappes,  October  14-22n<l 6  sq.  Km. 

West  of  Meuse,  October  2()th-November  ith 30  sq.  Km. 

East  of  Meuse,  November  4-llth 160  sq.  Km. 

Total    gain 220  .sq.   Km. 

MATERIEL  CAPTURED  BY  FIFTH  DIVISION 

Heavy    artillery 26 

Light    artillery 72 

Trench    mortars 74 

Machine    guns 802 

Rifles     1,685 

Large  quantities  of  ammunition,  engineer,  signal  and  ordnance  pnijicrly. 

PRISONERS  CAPTURED  BY  FIFTH  DIVISION 

Officers     51 

Enlisted    men 2,316 

Red  Cross  nur.se ' 1 

Total    prisoners    2,268 

MATERIEL  CAl'TUREI)   FROM  THE   ENEMY  RV   FIFTH   IMVISION 

.ST.   .MIHIEL   OPERATION 

150-millimeter    guns 13 

150-millimeter    guns 4 

77-millimeter    guns 25 

.\nti-tank  guns 7 

Anti-aircraft    battery 1 

Trench    mortars 30 

18-centimeter  smooth  hore  projectors ,360 

Machine   guns    125 

Rifles     550 

Ammunition,  artillery  and  trench  mortar,  rounds 100,000 

Powder,    cases 75 

Wireless    stations 1 

Medical  supply  depots  and  fir  t-aid  .stations,  equipped 2 

Field    hospital 1 

Horse  drawn   wagons 17 

Pharmacy    wagon 1 

Ammunition    wagons 2 

Rolling    kitchen 1 

Horses 65 

Bicycles    4 

Flat   cars 30 

Signal  equipment  valued  at  $100,000 
Several  miles  60-centimeter   railway   equipment. 

Large  quantities  of  small  arms  ammunition,  hand  grenades,  food  sujiplies,  engineer  equipment, 
maps,  secret  documents  and  small,  miscellaneous  articles. 


342  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ARGONNE-MEUSE  OPERATION 

288-millimeter  Austrian   gun 1 

210-miUimeter    guns 4 

210-millimeter  howitzers    3 

155-millimeter  howitzer    1 

77-millimeter    guns 17 

37-millimeter    guns 10 

Anti-tank    guns 8 

Heavy   trench  mortar 1 

Light  trench  mortars 10 

Minenwerfers    33 

Machine    guns 677 

Automatic    rifles 30 

Rifles     1,105 

Grenade    throwers 10 

Very    pistols 10 

Small  arms  ammunition (rounds)  2,853,500 

Minenwerfer  ammunition   (rounds)  4,405 

Grenades 30,000 

77-milIimeter   ammunition    ( rounds )  1,400 

Machine  gun  frames 12 

Machine  gun  stands,  heavy 30 

Wire  cutters,  lieavy 500 

Aeroplanes 2 

Signal  rockets  and  cartridges 8,000 

Signal  lights   (tons)  2 

Radio  set   1 

Telephone    sets 15 

Telephone  poles 3,012 

Caissons     17 

Wagons    21 

Railroad    engines 3 

Light  railroad  dump  cars 50 

Railroad  cars  60 

C.  M.  railroad  cars 100 

Cars,    warehouse 30 

Tractor    engines 2 

Vast   stores  of  engineer,  ordnance  and  signal  property,  railroad  yards   and   equipment, 

several  million  feet  of  lumber  and  innumerable  miscellaneous   articles   abandoned  in  towns. 


Prisoners  Captured  by  Fifth  Division 
PRISONERS  TAKEN   BY   FIETH   DIVISION 

ST.  DIE  SECTOR 

Officers 

10th  Landwehr  Regiment    

5()th  Lanciwehr  Regiment     

First    Bn.,   48th    Landsturm    Regt.    (formerly    Landsturm    Bn.    Elberfeld 

VII/4.9)     " 

Landsturm  Battalion  Friedberg  XVIII/10 

First  Bavarian  Ersatz  Regiment 

Escaped  Italian  prisoner  of  war 

Total    


343 


Enlisted 
3 
1 

2 
1 
2 
1 

10 


ST.   MIIIIEL 

Women 

332nd   Infantry  Regiment 

257th  Infantry  Regiment   

419th  Infantry  Regiment    

153rd   Infantry   Regiment 

47th   Infantry   Regiment 

174-th  Infantry   Regiment     

351st  Infantry  Regiment     

178th  Infantry  Regiment    

I   Landshirm   Battalion   Ludwigsburg    XIII-8 

I   West  Russian   Fusilier   Regiment    II 

Assault  Company — 77th   Reserve  Division 

Landwehr  Foot  Artillery,  42nd  Bn.,  4th  Btry 

30th  Landwehr  Foot  Ar'tiUery 

59th  Reserve  Field  Artillery ." 

11th  Foot  Artillery " 

S39th  Sanitary  Company 

10th   Minenwerfer   Battalion 

46th    Field    Hospital 

I  Pioneer  Battalion 

X  Pioneer  Battalion 

36th   Pioneer   Battalion 

32nd  Reserve  Pioneer  Battalion 

203rd  Reserve  Pioneer  Battalion 

I  Landwehr  Pioneer  Co.,  7th  Army  Corps 

Sound-Ranging  Section  No.  115    

Sound-Ranging  Section  No.  116     

Divisional  Wireless  Detachment 

Wireless  Detachment  No.  156 

Wurtemberg  Automobile  Ambulance  Detachment  No.  13 

Anti-Aircraft  Battery  No.  724 

Telephone  Detachment  No.  1 

Labor  Battalion  No.  97 

Labor  Battalion  No.  117 

Labor  Regiment,  77th  Division 

Supply  Column,  No.  88 

Telephone  Detachment  No.  477 

Agricultural  Company  No.  216 

Agricultural  Company  No.  217 

Flash-Ranging  Section  No.  66 

Flash-Ranging  Section  No.  160 

Railway  Regiment  No.  2 

Railway   Regiment   No.  3 

Grenadier  Regiment  No.  6 

Sector  Intelligence  Office  No.  81 


Officers 


Enlisted 

385 

42 

95 

5 

2 

7 
33 
15 
20 
20 

2 

7 

2 
24 
17 
22 
49 

4 
31 

3 

9 

2 

1 

4 

2 

6 

1 

S 

2 

3 

1 
39 

3 

1 

1 

2 

2 
52 

1 

6 

1 

4 

2 

3 


Officers 

Enlisted 

2 

3 

6 

3 

21 

265 

344  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ST.   MIHIEI.— Continued 

Women 

Earth-Telegraphy  Section  No.  2« 

Earth-Telegrapliy  Section  No.  2+2 

Hand-Searchlight  Section  No.  72 

Unassigned  recruits  from  depot  at  Waville 

No  record  of  organization 

Red  Cross  Nurse 1 

Total I  32  1,210 

MEUSE-,\KGONNE 

109th  Grenadier  Regt.,  28th  Division 

110th  Grenadier  Regt.,  28th  Division 

7th  Bavarian  Reserver  Hegt.,  5th  Bav.  Res.  Div 

10th  Bav.  Res.  Regt.,  5th  Bav.  Res.  Div 

12th  Bav.  Res.  Regt.,  5th  Bav.  Res.  Div 

351st  Regiment,  123rd  Division 

178th  Regiment,   123rd   Division 

106th  Reserve  Regiment,  123rd  Division 

Guard  Fusileers,  3rd  Guard  Division 

52nd  Reserve  Regiment,  107th  Division 

448th  Regiment,  107th  Division 

232nd  Reserve  Regiment,  107th  Division 

352nd   Regiment,  88th  Division 

11th  Grenadier  Regiment,  117th  Division 

157th  Regiment,  117th  Division 

450th  Regiment,  117th  Division 

77th   Regiment,  20th   Division 

79th  Regiment,  20th  Division 

473rd  Regiment,  241st  Division 

474th  Regiment.  241st  Division 

7th  Saxon  Jager  Regt.,  241st  Division 

6th  Grenadier   Regiment,   10th  Division 

47th   Regiment,   10th   Division 

250th  Reserve  Regiment,  75th  Reserve  Division 

251st  Reserve   Regiment,  75th   Reserve  Division 

Wurtemburg  Mountain  Regiment,  unattached 

56th  Machine  Gun   Marlisman   Detachment 

69th  Machine  Gun  Marksman  Detachment 

192nd  Telephine  Detachment 

49th  Division  Wireless  Detachment 

Prisoners  evacuated  directly  to  hospital 

Prisoners   sent   directly   to   Corps 

Total     19  l-f'96 


1 

2 

56 

2 

4 

35 

1 

135 

4 

9 

5 

171 

2 

1 

29 

4.2 

3 

106 

37 

4 

8 

23 

27 

5 

25 

16 

3 

1 

16 

42 

4 

88 

16 

2 

3 

1 

111 

2 

31 

Enemy  Units  Opposed  hy  Fifth  Division 


345 


RECAPITULATION 

Women  Officers  Enlisted 

St.   Die   Sector ..  10 

St.  Mihicl  Operation 1  32  1,210 

Meuse-Argonne   Operations 19  1,096 

Total     1  51  2,316 

Grand  total   2,368 

ENEMY  UNITS  ENGAGED  IN  ST.  DIE  SECTOR. 

ORDER  OF  BATTLE,  NORTH  TO  SOUTH. 

Landsturm  Battalion  Kempten. 

Landsturm  Battalion  Friedl)erg  (relieving  Ldst.  Bn.  Elberfcld). 

Landsturm  Battalion  Mosbach. 

Landsturm  Battalion   Bonn. 

Landsturm  Battalion  Koln. 

56th  Landwehr  Regiment. 

10th  Landwehr  Regiment. 

First  Bavarian  Ersatz  Regiment. 

217th  Field  Artillery  (supporting  whole  sector). 

ENEMY  UNITS  ENGAGED  IN  ST.  MIHIEL  OPER.VTION. 


Regiment 
.332nd  Inf. 
419th  Inf. 
257th  Res.  Inf. 
174th  Inf. 
106th  Inf. 
351st  Inf. 
178th    Inf. 


Division 

77th  Re.s. 

77th  Res. 

77th  Res. 

31st  Div. 

123rd  Div. 

123rd  Div. 

123rd  Div. 


Time 
Sept.  12,  A.  M. 
Sept.  12,  \.  M. 
Sept.  12,  A.  M. 
Sept.  12,  P.  M. 

Sept.  12,  P.  M.,  13,  14,  15,  16. 
Sept.  13,  14,  15,  16. 
Sept.  13,  14,  15,  16. 


Many  auxiliary  units  of  tlie  77th  Reserve  Division,  which  held  the  sector  at  the  beginning 
of  the  operation,  and  of  the  123rd  Division,  which  came  to  the  relief  of  the  77th  on  the  12-13th. 


346 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


ENEMY  UNITS  ENCACU'.D  IN  MEUSE-AHGUNNE  OPKKATIONS 

Regiment  Division  Time  Place 

110th  Grenadier 28th  Oct.  12  Cunel. 

109th  Grenadier 28th  Oct.  14  S.  W.  of  Bois  dcs  Uappes. 

Oct.  18  Bantheville. 

7th  Bav.   Res 5th  Bav.  Res.     Oct.  12  E.  of  Cunel. 

Nov.  3-5  Dun-sur-Meuse  and  Hills  292  and  260. 

Nov.    6  Cote   St.    Cierniain. 

10th   Bav.   Re^ 5th  Bav.  Res.     Nov.    2  N.  of  Clery-le-Petit. 

Nov.    iy  W.  slope  of  Hill  St.  Germain. 

12th  Bav.   Res 5th  Bav.  Hes.      Oct.  31  Clery-le-Grand. 

Nov.    1  N.  of  Clery-le-Grand. 

Nov.   2  Hill  201. 

Nov.    6  E.  of  Milly. 

351st    123rd  Oct.   12  W.  of  Bois  de  Foret. 

Oct.  l-l  Bois  de  la  Piiltiere. 

Oct.  15-16-18- 

20-21  Rois  des  Rappes. 

106th  Res 123rd  Oct.  14-15  W.  of  Bois  des  Rappes. 

Oct.  16-18  Bois  des   Rappes. 

178th    123rd  Oct.  12  N.  E.  of  Cunel. 

Oct.  14  E.  of  Romagne. 

Oct.  15-16-18  Bois  des  Rapes. 

Guard    Fusilier 3rd  Guard         Oct.  14  Romagne. 

9th    Grenadier 3rd   Guard         Oct.   14  E.   of   Romagne. 

52nd    Res 107th  Oct.  20-21  Bois  des  Rappes. 

448th    107th  Oct.  20  E.  of  Bois  des  Rappes. 

232nd   Res 107th  Nov.    1  E.  of  Aincreville. 

Nov.    2  N.  E.  of  Aincreville. 

352nd    88th  Oct   21  N.  of  Hill  299. 

Oct.  31  Aincreville. 

Nov.    1  N.  of  Aincreville 

Nov.    2  Bois  de  Bahiemont. 

11th    Grenadier 117th  Nov.    3-4-5  Near   IJny-devant-Dun. 

Nov.    6  N.  of  Fontaines. 

Nov.    7  Bois  du  Corrol. 

157th    117th  Nov.    6  Lion-devant-Dun. 

Nov.    7  N.  W.  of  Cote  St.  Germain. 

450th    I17th  Nov.    7  N.   E.   of  Lion-devant-Dun. 

Nov.    9  Mouzay. 

77th    20th  Nov.    6  Cote  St.  Germain. 

79th     20th  Nov.    0  Near  Murvaux. 

Nov.    9  Near  Mouzay. 

473rd    241st  Nov.    6  Near  Murvaux. 

Nov.    8  W.  of  Brandeville. 

474th    241st  Nov.    fi  Near  Murvaux. 

Nov.    7  Bois  de   Brandeville. 

7th   Saxon  Jager 241st  Nov.    6  N.  of  Fontaines. 

6th   Grenadier 10th  Nov.    7  La  Sentinelle. 

Nov.  10  N.  E.  of  Louppy. 

47th    10th  Nov.  10  N.  of  Louppy. 

398th    10th  Nov.  10  N.  W.  of  Louppy. 

251st    Res 75th  Res.  Nov.    9  .Taiuetz. 

250th   Res 75th  Res.  Nov.    9  Bois  de  Remoiville. 

Wurtemberg   Mountain Unattached       Nov.    5  Bois  de  Chatillon. 

Nov.    6  Near  Fontaines. 

56th  M.  G.  Marksman  Det.. Unattached        Nov.    3-4-5  Hills  260  and  292. 

Nov.    6  Cote    St.    Germain. 

69th  M.  G.  Marksman  Det.  .I'nattached        Nov.    4-5  Heights    near    Liny-devant-Dun. 

Nov.    6  E.  of  Fontaines. 

Nov.    8  W.  of  Brandeville. 
Total,  27   regiments   from   11   divisions;   also   1   ind<-pcndent   regiment   and  2   machine   gun 
marksman  detachments. 


Tables  of  Fifth  Division  Casualties  347 

CASUALTIES  OF  THE  FIFTH  DIVISION 

Official  War  Department  figures  publislied  in  the  Army  and 
Navy  Journal  of  May  15th,  1919,  announced  Fifth  Division  Casu- 
alties as: 

Killed  in  action  and  died  of  wounds 1,908 

Wounded    in    action 7,975 

Talvcn  prisoner  by  tlie  enemy 98 

Total 9,981 


Records  of  the  Fifth  Division  are  inadequate,  as  personnel 
wounded  in  action  and  missing  in  action  were  dropped  from  the  rolls 
and  further  information  has  been  received  from  the  Central  Records 
Office  or  by  the  return  of  personnel  to  their  organizations.  Many 
reiDorted  wounded  may  have  died  of  woimds  in  S.  O.  S.  hos- 
pitals. Undoubtedly  some  men  re])orted  missing  in  action  have  been 
cleared  up. 

In  the  tables  that  follow,  the  following  abbreviations  are  used: 


KIA — includes  Killed  in  Action  and  Died  of  Wounds. 
WIA — includes  severely  and  slightly  Wounded  in  Act 
GIA — Gassed  in  Action,  not  included  in  Wounded. 


TOTAL  CASUALTIES 

Killed    in    action 1,362 

Died  of  wounds 329 

Wounded   in   action 6,182 

Gassed    in    action 1,110 

Missing   in    action 256 

Taken    prisoner ^  .  .  60 

Total 9,299 

ANOULD  SECTOR— JUNE  15-JULY  15,  1918 

OFFICERS 

Organizations  WIA 

6th    Infantry 1 

11th    Infantry 4 

Total 5 

ENLISTED 

Obganizations  KIA  WIA  GIA 

60th   Infantry 11  17  26 

61st    Infantry 9  26  0 

6th   Infantry 2  11  0 

11th    Infantry 5  12  0 

15th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 1                          2  0 

Total 28  68  26 


Total 
54 
35 
13 
17 
3 

122 


348 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


SUMMARY 


KIA 

Officers    0 

Enlisted     28 

Total 28 


WIA 
5 

(J8 

73 


GIA 

0 
26 

26 


Total 

5 
122 

127 


ST.  DIE  SECTOR— JULY  15AUC.UST  23,  1918 

(Exclusive  of  Frapelle  Engagement) 

OFFICERS 

Organizations  KIA  WIA 

enth   Infantry 2  1 

61st    Infantry 1  1 

6tli   Infantry I  1 

1  Itli    Infantry t)  2 

15th  Machine  Clun  Hattalicm 0  1 

13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 0  0 

Total 4  6 


GIA 

Total 

0 

3 

0 

2 

0 

2 

0 

2 

2 

3 

1 

1 

13 


ENLISTED 

Obganizations  KIA 

entli   Infantry 3 

61st    Infantry 8 

6th   Infantry 6 

nth    Infantry 5 

l!Hh  Field  Artillery 1 

21st   Field   ArtiUery 0 

7th    Engineers 0 

13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 0 

Total 23 


VIA 

GIA 

Total 

26 

3 

32 

10 

0 

18 

18 

9 

33 

5 

26 

36 

0 

0 

1 

1 

0 

1 

2 

0 

2 

1 

0 

1 

63 


38 


124 


SUMMARY 

KIA  WIA 

Officers     4  6 

Enlisted    23  63 

Total 27  69 


GIA 

3 

38 

41 


Total 

13 
124 

137 


FRAPELLE  ENGAGEMENT,  AUGUST  17,  1918 

OFFICERS 

Organizations                                               KIA  WIA 

6tli    Infantry 1  11 

15th  Machine  Gun   Battalion 0  1 

20tli    Field    Artillery 0  0 

7tli     Engineers 0  1 

13th  Machine  Gun   Battalion 0  0 

9tli  Field  Signal  Battalion 0  0 

Total 1  13 


GIA 

Total 

6 

18 

0 

1 

2 

2 

0 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

11 

25 

Tables  of  Fifth  Division  Casualties 


349 


ENLISTED 

Obganizations  KIA 

6th  Infantry 13 

1.5th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 7 

20th    Field    Artillery 0 

7th    Engineers 5 

13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 1 

9th  Field  Signal  Battalion 0 

6th    Sanitary    Train 5 

Total 31 

SUMMARY 
KIA 

Officers    1 

Enlisted    31 

Total 32 


VIA 

GIA 

Total 

89 

111 

223 

16 

28 

47 

0 

2 

2 

25 

3 

33 

5 

9 

15 

0 

9 

9 

0 

0 

5 

135 


162 


328 


WIA 

GIA 

Total 

13 

11 

25 

135 

158 

334. 

148 


169 


359 


ST.  MIHIEL  OPERATION— SEPTEMBER  12-lT,  1918 

OFFICERS 

Obganizations  KIA  WIA  GIA 

60th  Infantry 1  9  3 

61st    Infantry (l  2  2 

14th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 0  0  8 

6th  Infantry 3  16  0 

nth    Infantry 7  11  3 

15th  Machine"  Gun  Battalion 1  3  0 

20th  Field  Artillery 0  1  0 

7th    Engineers 1  1  0 

9th   Field   Signal   Battalion 0  1  0 

Total 13  44  11 

ENMSTED 

Obganizations  KIA  WI.\  GIA 

60th  Infantry 41  196  26 

61st   Infantry 12  53  26 

14th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 10  36  3 

6th  Infantry 69  238  19 

11th    Infantry 129  470  24 

15th  Machine"  Gun  Battalion 34  77  3 

19th    Field    Artillery 0  3  0 

20th  Field  Artillery". 1  2  0 

21.st  Field  .\rtillery 5  5  1 

7th    Engineers 4  32  8 

9th   Field  Signal  Battalion 0  6  2 

6th  Sanitary  Train 0  5  4 

Total 305  1,123  116 

SUMMARY 

KIA  WIA  GIA 

Officers    13  44  11 

Enlisted    .305  1.123  116 

Total 318  1,167  127 


Total 
13 

4 

3 
19 
21 

4 

1 

2 

1 

68 


TOTA 

263 

91 

49 

326 

623 

114 

3 

3 

11 

44 

8 

9 


1,544 


Total 

68 
1,544 

1,612 


350 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


FIRST  PHASE,  MEUSE-ARGONNE  OPERATION— OCTOBER  12-23,  1918 

OFFICERS 

Organizations  KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

9th    Brigade    Headquarters 0  10  1 

fiOth   Infantry 12  20  12  44 

(ilst   Infantry 10  29  8  47 

Itth   Machine  Gun   Battaliun 2  4  4  10 

Gth   Infantry 6  28  3  37 

llth    Infantry 12  34  6  S2 

15th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 3  5  0  8 

7th    Engineers 5  7  0  12 

13th   Machine   Battalion 0  3  0  3 

9th   Field   Signal  Battalion 0  0  1  1 

5th    Military    Police 110  2 

Total SI  132  34  217 

ENLISTED 

Organizations  KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

Headquarters     Troop 0  1  0  1 

9th    Brigade    Headquarters 0  0  11 

(iOth   Infantry 136  612  88  836 

61st    Infantry 132  600  239  971 

1 1th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 9  78  17  104 

6th    Infantry 139  468  27  634 

nth    InfantVy 210  865  87  1,162 

15th  Machine"  Gun  Battalion 35  121  17  173 

7th    Engineers 44  139  19  202 

13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 14  37  6  57 

9th   Field   Signal   Battalion 4  19  17  40 

5th  Supply  Train 1  0  0  1 

5th    Sanitary    Train 2  15  9  26 

5th  Ammunition   Train 1  4  0  5 

5th  M.  O.  R.  S 0  1  0  1 

5th  Military  Police 1  10  1  12 

Salvage  Uiiit  301 0  6  0  6 

Total 728  2,976  528  4,232 

SUMMARY 

KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

Officers     51  132  34  217 

Enlisted    728  2,976  528  4,232 

Total 779  3,108  562  4,449 

SECOND   PHASE,   MEUSE-ARGONNE   OPERATION— OCT.  26-NOV.    11.   1918 

OFFICERS 

Organizations  KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

Division    Headquarters 0  10  1 

9th  Brigade  Headquarters 0  2  0  2 

60th  Infantry 3  16  9 

61st    Infantry 3  2  2  7 

14th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 1  3  0  4 

6th    Infantry 4  6  1  11 

llth    Infantry 1  15  0  16 

7th  Engineers 13  0  4 

9th  Field  Signal  Battalion 0  1  0  1 

Total It  33  8  65 


Tables  of  Fifth  Divisioii  Casualties 


351 


ENLISTED 

Organizations  KIA 

60th  Infantry T4 

61st    Infantry 99 

Uth  Machine  Gun  Battalion 4 

6th    Infantry 91 

11th    Infantry 139 

15th  Machine  Gun  Battalion 15 

7th     Engineers 10 

13th    Machine   Gun    Battalion 4 

9th  Field  Signal  Battalion 7 

5th  Sanitary  Train 0 

Total 443 


WIA 

GIA 

Total 

236 

38 

348 

287 

15 

401 

19 

6 

29 

265 

19 

375 

477 

27 

643 

29 

3 

47 

139 

19 

168 

11 

3 

18 

15 

2 

24 

9 

5 

14 

1,487 


137 


2,067 


SUMMARY 

KIA  WIA 

Officers     14  33 

Enlisted    443  1,487 

Total 457  1,520 


145 


Total 
55 

2,067 

2,122 


OFFICER   CASUALTIES 

Organizations  KIA  DW  WIA 

Division    Headquarters 1  0  0 

9th    Brigade    Headquarters 0  0  3 

60th    Infantry 14  4  31 

61st  Infantry 10  4  34 

14th   Machine   Gun    Battalion 3  0  7 

6th    Infantry 13  2  63 

11th     Infantry 16  4  66 

15th   Machine"  Gun   Battalion 3  1  10 

19th    Field    Artillery 0  1  4 

20th   Field   Artillery 0  0  1 

21st  Field  Artillery 0  0  0 

7th    Engineers 4  3  12 

13th   Machine  Gun    Battalion 0  0  3 

9th  Field  Signal  Battalion 0  0  2 

5th  Military   Police 1  0  1 

Total 65  19  237 


GIA 

MIA 

Total 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

3 

20 

0 

69 

12 

0 

60 

7 

0 

17 

10 

1 

88 

9 

0 

95 

2 

0 

16 

0 

0 

5 

7 

0 

8 

1 

0 

1 

0 

1 

20 

3 

0 

6 

2 

0 

4 

0 

0 

2 

73 


395 


ENLISTED   CASUALTIES 

Organizations  KIA  DW         WIA  GIA 

5th  Headquarters  Troop 0  0  10 

9th   Brigade   Headquarters...  0  0  0  1 

60th    Infantry 216  49  1.087  181 

61st     Infantry 212  48  976  280 

14th  Machine  Gun  Battalion..  21  2  133  26 

6th    Infantry 269  51  1,089  185 

nth    Infantry 395  93  1.829  164 

1.5th  Machine" Gun  Battalion..  73  19  245  51 

19th   Field   Artillery 17  16  37  7 

20th   Field   Artillery 9  2  28  23 

21st    Field   ArtiUery 9  3  39  3 

7th    Engineers " 44  19  337  49 


MIS 

PRIS 

TOTAI 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

88 

27 

1,648 

24 

17 

1,557 

2 

0 

184 

48 

6 

1,648 

82 

8 

2,571 

10 

0 

398 

0 

0 

77 

0 

0 

62 

0 

0 

64 

0 

2 

451 

352 


History  of  tJic  Fifth  Division 


ENLISTED  CASUALTIES— Con<t7i««d 

Orgaxizatioxs                    KIA           DW  \VL\  CIA 

13th  Machine  Gun  Battalion..        15                 4.  5t  18 

9th  Field  Signal  Battalion 9                 2  40  30 

5th    Supply    Train 10  0  0 

5th    Sanitary   Train 6                  1  29  18 

5th   Ammunition   Train 10  4  0 

5th  M.  O.  H.  S 0                0  1  0 

5th   Military   Police 0                  1  10  1 

Salvage  Uiiit  301 0                0  6  0 

Total 1^9"             310  5.945  1,037 


MIS 

PRIS 

Total 

0 

0 

91 

0 

0 

81 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

54 

0 

0 

5 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

6 

254 


60 


8,903 


KIA 

Officers    65 

EnUsted    1,297 

Total 1,362 


SUMMARY 

DW         WIA 

GIA 

MIS 

PRIS 

Total 

19            237 

73 

O 

0 

395 

310          5,945 

1,037 

254. 

60 

8,903 

329 


6,182 


1,110 


256 


60 


9,299 


RECAPITULATION 

OFFICERS 

AcTiox                                                KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

A  nould   Sector 0  5  0  5 

St.   Die  Sector 4  6  3  13 

Frapelle    Engagement 1  13  11  25 

St.   Mihiel   Operation 13  44  11  68 

First   Pha.se,   Meuse-Argonne 51  132  34  217 

Second  Phase,  Meuse-Argonne 14  33  8  55 

Fifth  Field  Artillery  Brigade 1  4  6  11 

Total 84.  237  73  394 

ENLISTED 

AcTiox                                               KIA  AVIA  GIA  Total 

Anould   Sector 28  68  26  122 

St.   Die  Sector 23  63  38  124 

Frapelle    Engagement 31  135  162  328 

St.   Mihiel  Operation 305  1,123  116  1.544 

First    Phase,    Meuse-Argonne 728  2.976  528  4,232 

Second  Phase,  Meuse-Argonne 443  1,487  137  2,067 

Fifth   Field  Artillery   Brigade 49  93  30  172 

Total 1,607  5,945  1,037  8,589 

SUMMARY 

KIA  WIA  GIA  Total 

Officers     84  237  73  394 

Enlisted     1,607  5,945  1,037  8,589 

Total 1,691  6,182  1,110  8,983 

Missing   in   Action 256 

Taken    Prisoners 60 

Grand   Total 9^99 


Fifth  Division  Personnel  Taken  Prisoners 


353 


ENLISTED  MEN  OF  FIFTH  DIVISION  TAKEN  PRISONER 
BY  THE  ENEMY 


SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 


Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

25. 
Cpl. 
Cpl. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

25. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Grover  C.  Folger,  Hdqtrs.  Co.,  Sept 
Earl  L.  HendrLx,  Co.  A,  Oct.  12. 
Edward  Jiikes,  Co.  A,  July  24. 
Guy  IJvingstone,  Co.  A,  July  24. 
Albert  K.  Moyer,  Co.  A,  Sept.  25. 
l.st  CI.  Charles  Rosenkranz,  Co.  A 


16. 


Sept. 


William  Bowen,  Co.  B,  Oct.  14. 

George  A.  Kratz,  Co.  B,  Oct.  14. 

Paello  Leony,  Co.  B,  Oct.  14. 

Edwin  Weston,  Co.  B,  Oct.  14. 

l.st  CI.  Antonios  .\rgyrople,  Co.  C,  Sept. 

Benjamin  Clemson,  Co.  C,  Sept.  25. 
Leroy  B.  Fairless,  Co.  C,  Sept.  25. 


Pvt.  George  Goodman,  Co.  C,  Sept.  25. 
Cpl.  Wallace  D.  Kennedy,  Co.  C,  Sept.  25. 
Sgt.  Leon  Urbanowski,  Co.  C,  Oct.  14. 
Cpl.  Adam  Sword,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Frank  F.  Williams,  Co.  K,  Oct.  12. 
Cpl.  Ralph  de  Pa.squale,  Co.  L,  Nov.  10. 
Pvt.  Onsiefor  Gorliatoff,  Co.  L,  Oct.  12. 
Pvt.  John  McClellan,  Co.  L,  Nov.  10. 
Cpl.  Aubrey  H.  Travers,  Co.  L,  Aug.  18. 
Pvt.  Vincenzo  Filoni,  Co.  M,  Nov.   10. 
Pvt.  John  H.  Luddy,  Co.  M,  Oct.  12. 
Pvt.  Edward  J.  Ricedorf,  Co.  M,  Oct.  14. 
Pvt.  Manuel  Rodriguez,  Co.  M,  Oct.  12. 
Pvt.  Guy  .\.  Spinelli,  Co.  M,  Nov.  10. 


SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  Thomas  Judge,  Co.  B,  Nov.  6. 
Cpl.  Raymond  Lawton,  Co.  B,  Oct.  18. 
Pvt.   Walter  .\.  Snell,  Co.  B,  Nov.  6. 
Pvt.  Thomas  Sydnor,  Co.  B,  Oct.  IS. 
Cpl.  John  Richardson,  Co.  C,  Nov.  6. 
Pvt.  .\nnibalo  Antonelle,  Co.  D,  Nov.  6. 
Pvt.  Lewis  C.  Belleter,  Co.  D,  Nov.  6. 
Pvt.  Morgan  F.  Connor,  Co.  D,  Nov.  G. 
Cpl.  John  Dobermiller,  Co.  D,  Nov.  6. 


Cpl.   David   Lewis,  Jr.,  Co.  D,  Nov.  6. 
Sgt.  Jesse  J.  Wiley,  Co.  D,  Nov.  6. 
Pvt.  Carl  Blon,  Co.  E,  Nov.  6. 
Pvt.  John  Wilson,  Co.  F,  Sept.  16. 
Sgt.  John  E.  Morrow,  Co.  G,  Oct.  16. 
Sgt.  William  Pogeedick,  Co.  K,  Oct.  17. 
Sgt.   Malcolm  Yates,  Co.  K,  Oct.  17. 
Cjil.  Charles  H.  Doane,  Co.  L,  June  22. 


SIXTH  INFANTRY 


Cpl.  Sylvanis  Parks,  Co.  A,  Nov.  ' 
Pvt.  Natali  Sedeli,  Co.  A,  Nov.  7. 
Pvt.  Joseph  Reed,  Co.  C,  Oct.  21. 


Pvt.   Wcller  Smith.  Co.  C,  Oct.  21. 

Pvt.  Samuel  Shank,  Co.  C,  Oct.  21. 

1st  Sgt.  Charles  W.  Terhune,  Co.  C,  July  21. 


ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  Oscar  I-.  Forslund,  Co.  G. 

Pvt.  Clemens  J.  Herman,  Co.  G. 

Sgt.   Roy  B.  Ames,  Co.  I,  Nov.  7. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Sidney  S.  Ayer.s,  Co.  I,  Oct.   14. 

Pvt.  Everett  Kemble,  Co.'l,  Oct.  14. 


Pvt.  1st  CI.  Edward    H.    Laskowski,    Co.    I, 

Oct.  14. 
Pvt.  Tony  Rinaldi.  Co.  I,  Nov.  7. 
Pvt.  George    M.    Marshall,   Company   K,   Oct. 

20. 


Pvt.   1st  CI.   Maurice  L.  Weddington,  Co.  C, 
Nov.  6. 


SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 

Pvt.  Gurdon  M.  AVilmot.  Co.  C,  Sept.  20. 


354 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


MISSING  IN  ACTION 
OFFICERS 
2nd  Lieut.  .Ii)lm  C.  Roche,  lifli  Inf.  2nil  Lieut.  Loui.s  Leidl,  7th  Eng. 


ENLISTED  MEN 


SIXTIETH  INF.VNTRY 


Pvt.  Pavel   Chri.st,   Hdqtrs.   Co.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Roliert  A.  Courtney.  Hdqtr.s.  Co.       Pvt. 

Pvt.  Ernest  L.  Keiber,  Hdqtrs.  Co.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Howard  F.  MuUins,  Hdqtrs.  Co.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Louis  I.ongobardo,  M.  G.  Co.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Hugh  B.  Donaldson,  M.  G.  Co.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Lee  Sl<yles,  M.  G.  Co,  Pvt. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Albert  Bradford,  Co.   A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Willard  J.  Boutin,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Thornton   Burnett,  Co.  A.  Cpl. 

Pvt.  Cornelius  Donelan.  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Arthur  Edwards,  Co.  A.  Cpl. 

Pvt.  Angrelo  Giacini,  Co.  A.  Cpl. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Richard  Goldberg,  Co.  A.  Sgt. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Harry  .\.  Keyes,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  George  A.  Kreuger,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Edward  M.  Meier,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Cpl.  Lotie  Suiith,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Cpl.  Anton  Stein,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Alfred  G.  Toense,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Alfred  Derouin,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Eddie  F.  Jaclvson,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Thomas  .Teffs,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Mec.  Roland  M.  Leland,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Vincenzo  Perna,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Dante  J.   Riccio,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Henry  F.  Tifllant'ei".  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  John  B.  Anderson,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Charles  F.  Davis,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Thomas  J.  Evans,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Charles  Jilek,  Co.  C.  Cpl. 

Pvt.  Carlin  O.  Jones,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Cpl.  George  F.  Lynch,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  And.  Levston,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  John  J.  McCloskey,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Anon  L.  Moser,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Lester  L.  Rowe,  Co.  C.  Sgt. 

Pvt.  Edward  J.  Stoot,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Edward  Urbanic,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  James  A.  Vincent,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Thomas  L.  Wingle,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Cpl.  Oren   Clark,  Co.   D.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Stanlv  Buchman,  Co.  D.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  AUu-rt  L.  Hiatt,  Co.  D.  Pvt. 


Ernest  Williams,  Co.  D. 
Thomas  McCray,  Co.  E. 
William  H.   Brooks,  Co.  F. 
Walter  Leman,  Co.  F. 
Carl  F.  Pinkele,  Co.  F. 
Oscar  G.  Alexander,  Co.  G. 
William  Amerina,  Co.  G. 
Lewis  J.  Cutler,  Co.  G. 
Garret  Baker,  Co.  G. 
Roy  B.  Bunnell,  Co.  G. 
Fred  Burnev,  Co.  G. 
Joseph  M.  Gaylor,  Co.  G. 
Leontie  Hutnickow,  Co.  G. 
James  B.  Leanion,  Co.  G. 
George  M.  Willis,  Co.  G. 
Patrick  J.  Dunn,  Co.  H. 
Leo  .\.  IMoran,  Co.  H. 
Francis  Cox,  Co.  I. 
Andrew  Elliott,  Co.  I. 
Bernard  Harrington,  Co.  I. 
Olin  Letcher,  C'n.  I. 
Bendetto  Ruggeri,  Co.  I. 
Kick  Yana,  Co.  I. 
Joseph  Frasier,  Co.  K. 
Henry  B.  Koch,  Co.  K. 
William  Moreau,  Co.  K. 
Phillip  Rocket,  Co.  K. 
Harry  Sliapiro,  Co.  K. 
Paul  Vadluga,  Co.  K. 
John  C.  Boothe,  Co.  L. 
Watson  Daniel,  Co.  I>. 
1st  CI.  .\ustin  W.  Eidson,  Co.  L. 
Charles  C.  Rex,  Co.  L. 
William  Webli,  Co.  L. 
Georgio   Blanco,   Co.   M. 
Carl  A.  Glanzel,  Co.  M. 
Elmer  Johnson,  Co.  M. 
Stephen  Johnson,  Co.  M. 
Wactaw   Klucnicki,  Co.   M. 
Jolin  .Toseph  Kilday,  Co.  M. 
Mariano  I.eggio,  Co.  M. 
Raymond  C.  Mangan,  Co.  M. 
Frank  Xaniiotka,  Co.  M. 
l.iroy  X.  RejTiolds,  Co.  M. 


SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  Gilbert  Bendorf.  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  John  Beaumont,  Jr.,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Harmon  A.  Worrall,  Co.  .\. 
Pvt.  George  A.  Bhindy,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  William  H.  English,  Co.  B. 


Pvt.  Wesley  H.  Strang,  Co.  B. 

Pvt.  Stefan  Sniorgal,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Anthony  W.  Ash,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Richard  Campbell,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Frank  Niton,  Co.  D. 


Fifth  Division  Personnel  Missing  in  Action 


355 


SIXTY-FIKST  INFANTRY— r„„n„,(C(/ 


Pvt.  Albert  Dollar,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  John  Slechta,  Co.   D. 
Pvt.  Fred  Wilson,  Co.  D. 
Pvt.  William  Coutts,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Claude  H.  Edwards,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  William  Filewicz,  Co.  F. 
Cpl.  John  Hul)l)ard,  Co.  F. 


Pvl.  Jolin  W.  Reveney,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Walter   Wachaskee,  Co.   F. 

Pvt.  Thoma.s  J.   Waters,  Co.  F. 

Cpl.  Louis  W.  Kuhn,  Co.  H. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Frank  Kochanouski,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Thomas  F.  Mann,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  0.scar  J.  Gallas,  Co.  M. 


FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 
Pvt.  Carl   E.   .\nderson,  Co.  D.  Sgt.  Peter  Reizuck,  Co.  D. 


SIXTH  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  1st  CI.  Noel  W.  Luddy,  Hdqtrs.  Co.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  John  M.  Hoover,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Calvin  Jackson,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  George  Shurrock,  Co.  A.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Fisher  Brockman,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Lester  Brown,  Co.  B.  Cpl. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Theodore  B.  Mill,  Co.  B.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Fred  Nettler,  Co.  B.  Mec. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Raymond  E.  Barnes,  Co.  C.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Herbert  D.   Buss,  Co.  C.  Cpl. 

Pvt.  Thomas  W.  Mathers,  Co.  D.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Carl  Allen,  Co.  E.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Henry  B.  Dorosett,  Co.  E.  Pvt. 

Cpl.  Morris  T.  Holt,  Co.  E.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Jim  Jacks,  Co.  E.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Golman  Kidd,  Co.  E.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  Joe  D.  King,  Co.  E.  Cpl. 

Pvt.  Charles  Trentini,  Co.  E.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Edward  R.  Moore,  Co.  F.  Pvt. 

Mec.  Arthur  D.  Gihbs,  Co.  G.  Sgt. 

Pvt.  Dan  N.  Hart,  Co.  G.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  George  B.  Kirkman,  Co.  G.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Louis  B.  Probst,  Co.  G.  Pvt. 

Pvt.  John  W.  Thomas,  Co.  G.  Pvt. 


Charlie  E.  Younger,  Co.  G. 
Sylvester   Beavan,  Co.   H. 
Thomas  R.  Canada,  Co.  H. 
David  Dasco,  Co.  H. 
Paul  Mosarik,  Co.  H. 
Earl  Taratus,  Co.  H. 
1st  CI.  Ivy  W.  Wright,  Co.  H. 
Riley  W.  Wright,  Co.  H. 
1st  CI.  William  A.  Wright,  Co.  H. 
Martin  Sohahrer,  Co.  I. 
Marvin  E.  Cary,  Co.  K. 
Willie  Duggins,  Co.  L. 
Elmer  W.  Johnson,  Co.  L. 
Ambrose  S.   Knudson,  Co.  L. 
William  O'Toole,  Co.  L. 
Marco  Romani,  Co.  L. 
Henry  M.  Rookard,  Co.  L. 
Timothy  G.  Ames,  Co.  M. 
John  H.  Ballman,  Co.  M. 
John  F.  Clayton,  Co.  M. 
Arthur  Collier,  Co.  M. 
David  C.  Davis,  Co.  M. 
Harold  A.  Hall,  Co.  M. 
John  Kool,  Co.  M. 


ELEVENTH  INFANTRY 


Pvt.  .-Mvin  Colwell,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Carmine  D'Aloia,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Vurner  M.  Ellis,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  John  W.  Ellis,  Co.  \. 
Pvt.  Celestine  Gamble,  Co.  A. 
Sgt.  Robert  Lee  Gautreau,  Co.  A 
Pvt.  George  M.  Greer,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.   Peter  Highley,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Eugene  O'Boyle,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Edward  Reed,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  James  B.  Ward,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  Daniel  J.  Barone,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  John  B.  Crosetto,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.   Richard   Gassett,  Co.   B. 
Pvt.  Arthur  Mathis,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.   Edward  Sinowiec,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  William  L.  Strecker,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  Harry  J.  Streit,  Co.  B. 


Pvt.  Charles  Marietta,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Charles  Messerer,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  Anthony  Peck,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  William  Ward,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.   Harold  Lemy  .-Mien,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Hubert  H.  Bratton.  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Angelomario  Fiocco,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Mark  I.  Godfrey,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Henry  B.   Ham,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  William  W.  Jenkins,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Gus  Pequinot,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Mike  Slomka,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Claude  S.  Wells,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Allem  Brinzom,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Thomas  E.  Hogarth,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Leonard  Lacey,  Co.  E. 

Pvt.  Joseph  H.  Daw.son,  Co.  F. 

Pvt.  Edwin  W.  Fri.sto,  Co.  F. 


356 


History  of  the  Fifth  Division 


ELEVENTH   I N  F  A  NT  RY^Cont  In  ued 


Pvt.  Charles  E.  Ginifred,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Wladyslaw  Jarosz,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Taylor  Jordon,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  John   I.ohaneck,  Co.   F. 
Pvt.  Raymond  Roscher,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  William  A.  Savanger,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Joseph  Snyker,  Co.  F. 
Pvt.  Robert  Burgess,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Robert  L.  Dickerson,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Joe  Smnsky,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Sherman  H.  Turner,  Co.  G. 
Pvt.  Hugo  V.  Carlson,  Co.  H. 
Pvt.  Joe  Bernotes,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  James  S.  Gimer,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Charles  W.   Henderson,  Co.   I 
Pvt.  Lloyd  C.  House,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Arthur  Johnson,  Co.  L 
Pvt.  Martin  C.  Johnson,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Reuben  C.  Karper,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Albert  Khig,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Homer  J.  O'Neal,  Co.  L 
Pvt.  1st  CI.  Erwin  Pettit,  Co.  I. 
Pvt.  Neil   Pruusgaard,  Co.   1. 


Pvt.  Pete  Szveth,  Co.  I. 

Pvt.  Frank  Yost,  Co.  L 

Pvt.  Bernard  Fromholz,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  John  R.  Gifford,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  James  L.  Green,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Ernest  S.  Landruth,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Thomas  Pliska,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  George  Wolfe,  Co.  K. 

Pvt.  Earl  J.  Franklin,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Arthur  J.  Franke,  Co.  L. 

Sgt.   Herman   Heft,  Co.   L. 

Pvt.  Frank  Mahan,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.   Roceo  Morat,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Michael  Skalla,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  ,)()hn   Smith,  Co.   L. 

Pvt.  George  Summers,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  Paul  L.  Weeks,  Co.  L. 

Pvt.  C'cjunie  Bishop,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Benjamin  Gosiell,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Joe  W.  Knott,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  William  D.  Machmer,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  C>eorge  W.  Rhyne,  Co.  M. 

Pvt.  Harold   Warner,  Co.   M. 


FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 


Pvt.  Harrv   M.   Seeright,  Co.   A. 
Pvt.  Frank  Sertiff,  Co.  A. 
Pvt.  George  H.  Thompson,  Co.  B. 
Pvt.  1st  CI.  Herman  Davis,  Co.  C. 
Cpl.  Fred  Denman,  Co.  C. 


Pvt.  .\rthur  .1.  Sehmirr,  Co.  C. 

Pvt.  1st  CI.  Simon  E.  Welchanee,  Co.  C. 

Sgt.  Louis  M.  Lowe,  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Harry  Murjihy.  Co.  D. 

Pvt.  Melvin  Sweatt,  Co.  D. 


ARMIES   AND   ARMY   CORPS 

The  Fifth  Division  has  operated  under  one  Fn-rich   and   three  Ameriean   .\ruiies   and  one 
French  and  six  Ameriean  Army  Corps,  as  follows: 

Seventh  French  Army fune  1st  to  August  '23rd. 

First   Ameriean   Army July  13th  to  Novemlier  21st. 

Third  American  Army November  22nd  to  December  12th. 

Second    American    Army December  13th  to  March  31st,  1910. 

Third   American   Army April  1st  to  May  11th. 

Thirty-third    (French)    Corps June  1st   to  August   23rd. 

Third   Army   Corps May  1st  to  May  31st. 

First  Army  Corps lune  1st  to  June  I7th. 

Third   Army   Corps June  18th  to  July  9th. 

Fifth  Army  Corps July  10th  to  August   18th. 

Seventh  Army  Corps August  19th  to  ,'\ugust  28th. 

First  Army  Corps August  28th  to  September  Kith. 

Fourth    Army   Corps September  17th  to  Octolier  -Ith. 

Third   Army    Corps October  5th  to  November  1.5th. 

Fifth   Army   Corps November  ICth  to  November  21st. 

Seventh  Army  Corps November   22nd   to  December   12th. 

Sbith  Army  Corps December   12th   to   March  31st,   1919. 

Seventh  -Army  Corps April  1st  to  May  11th. 


Locations  of  Fifth  Division  Headquarters  357 


LOCATIONS  OF  FIFTH  DIVISION'  HEADQUARTERS 

Liverpool,    England,    arrived April  28tli,  1918. 

Southampton,   England,   left April  30th,  1918. 

Le  Havre,   France May  1st  to  May  3rd. 

Bar-sur-Aube     (Aube) May  4lh  to  June  2nd. 

Corcieux    ( Vosges) June  3rd  to  June  6th. 

Gerardner    (Vosges) June  6th  to  July  15th. 

St.  Die   (Vosges) July  15th  to  August  23rd. 

Arches    (Vosges) August  23rd  to  August  29th. 

Neuviller-sur-Moselle    (M&M) August  29th   to  September  8th. 

Martincourt   (M&M) September    8th    to    September    lOtb. 

Advance  P.  C.  St.  Jacques  (M&M) September    10th    to    September    18tli. 

Rear  echelon  Martincourt  (M&M). 

Domevre-en-Haye    (M&M) September    18th    to    September   27th. 

Pagny-sur-Meuse     (Meuse) September  27th  to  October  6th. 

Blercourt    ( Meuse) October  6th  to  October  12th. 

.'Vdvance  P.  C.  Bois  de  Tuilerie  (Meu.se) October  12th  to  November  3rd. 

Rear  echelon  Fromerville  (Meuse). 
Advance  P.  C.  Cunel   (Meuse) November  3rd   to   November  7th. 

Rear  echelon  Jouy-en-Argonne  (Meuse). 
Advance  P.  C.  Dun-sur-Meuse   (Meuse) November   7th   to   November   10th. 

Rear  echelon  Jouy-en-Argonne  (Meuse). 
Advance  P.  C.  Murvaux  ( Jleuse) November  10th  to   November   12th. 

Rear  echelon  Jouy-en-Argonne  (Meu.se). 

Lion-devant-Dun    (Meuse) November   12th   to   November  23rd. 

Longuyon    (M&M) November  23rd  to  December  4th. 

Hollerich    (I>uxemburg) December   4th   to   December    11th. 

Merl    (Luxemburg) December   11th   to   December   17th. 

Esch-sur-Alzette    (Luxemburg) December  17th  to  . 


358  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

FIFTH  DIVISION  STATION  LIST,  MAY  11,  1919 
(All  stations  in  LuxL'niboiii'g  unless  otherwise  specified) 

Fifth   Division   HeaUquaiters Esch-sur-Alzette. 

Heaclquart(.rs    Troop Esch. 

Ninth  Infantry  Brigade  Headquarters Esch. 

Sixtietli  Infantry  Headquarters Esch. 

Headquarters,  Supply  and  Maeliine  Gun  Conipanici Esch. 

First    Battalion    Headquarters Esch. 

Companies  A,  C  and  D Esch. 

Company    B Remich. 

Second   Battalion Esch. 

Third    Batalion Esch. 

Sixty-lirst   Infantry   Headquarter., Ditferdange. 

Headquarters  and  Supply  Companies Diii'erdange. 

Machine  Gun   Company Rodange. 

First   Battalion    Headquarters Aubange   (Belgium). 

Company    A Aubange   ( Belgium) . 

Company    B Croix-Houge    (Belgium). 

Companies  C  ana  D Athus   (Belgium) 

Second   Battalion   Headquarter Niederkorn. 

Companies  E,  F  and  Ct Niederkorn. 

Company    H Differdange. 

Third   Battalion Difl'erdange. 

Fourteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  Headquarters Oberkorn. 

Companies  A,  B  and  D Oberkorn. 

Company  C Zolver. 

Tenth  Infantry   Brigade  Headquarters Esch. 

.Sixth    Infantry    Headquarters Diekirch. 

Headquarters  and  Machine  Gun  Companies Diekirch. 

Supply    Company Ettelbruek. 

Fir.st   Battalion   Headquarters E.schternach. 

Company    A Rosport. 

Company    B Wasserbillig. 

Company    C Prum  (Germany). 

Company    D Bitburg. 

Second    I?attalinn    Headquarters Diekirch. 

Company    E BoUendorf  (Germany). 

Company    F Dasburg   (Gernumy ) . 

Company    G Luxembourg. 

Company   H Vianden. 

Third   Battalion   Headquarters Mersch. 

Com])any    I Diekirch. 

Company    K Mersch. 

Company    L Mertert. 

Company   M Steinfort. 

Eleventh  Infantry  Headquarters Schifflange. 

Headquarters,  Su]iply  and  Maeliine  tnm  Comj)anies Sehiffiange. 

First    Battalion    Headquarters Monnerich. 

Comjiany    A ..Tetange. 

Comjianies  B,  C  and  D Monnerich. 

Second    Battalion Esch. 

Third     Battalion Schifflange. 

Fifteenth  Machine  Cnm  Battalion   Head(iuarters Bergem. 

Companies  A  and  B Bergera. 

Comi>anies  C  and  D Ehlange. 

Fifth   Field   .\rtillery   Brigade   Headquarters Peppange. 

Nineteenth    Field   Artillery   Headquarters Hesperange. 

Headquarters    Company Hesperange. 

Supply    Company Krauthem. 


Station  List  of  May  11th,  1919  359 

FIFTH  DIVISION  STATION  LIST.  .MAY  II,  l^\Q— Continued 
(All  stations  in  Luxeiiibouifr  iinlfs.s  utluTwise  specified) 

First   Battalion   Headquarters Hesperange. 

Batteries  A  and  B Altzengen. 

Battery    C Fentangen. 

Second    Battalion   Headquarters Itzig. 

Batteries  D  and  E Itzig. 

Battery  F Sandweiller. 

Twentieth  Field  Artillery  Headquarters I.eudelange. 

Headquarters    Company Leudelange. 

Supply  Company Livange. 

First   Battalion   Headquarters Bivange. 

Battery    A Bercliera. 

Battery    B Bivange. 

Battery    C Roeser. 

Second  Battalion  Headquarter:; Cessingen. 

Batteries  D  and   E Leudelange. 

Battery  F Cessingen. 

Twenty-first  Field  Artillery  Headquarter.. Dudelange. 

Headquarters  and  Supply  Comjianie Dudelange. 

First    Battalion Dudelange. 

Second   Battalion    Headquarters Burange. 

Battery    C Burange. 

Battery    D Hellange. 

Third    Battalion Dudelange. 

Thirteenth  Machine  Gun  Battalion  Headquarters Arlon  (Belgium). 

Company    A .Arlon   ( Belgium). 

Company    B Virton   (Belgium). 

Seventh   Engineers Rumelange. 

Ninth  Field  Signal  Battalion Esch. 

Fifth  Train  Headquarters Bettembourg. 

Fifth  Supply  Train Kayl. 

Fifth  Ammunition  Train  Headquarters Bettembourg. 

Motor    Battalion Bettembourg. 

Horsed   Battalion   Headquarters Fennange. 

Company    E Huncherange. 

Company    F Budersberg. 

Company    G Nortzange. 

Fifth   Sanitary  Train   Headquarters Mondorf. 

Field  Hospital  Co.  No.  17 Fels. 

Field  Hospital  Companies  Nos.  2.5,  ^H  and  .30 Mondorf. 

Ambulance  Companies  Nos.  17  and  29 Mondorf. 

Ambulance  Company  No.  25 Fels. 

Ambulance  Company  No.  30 Aspelt. 

Division  Medical  Supply  Unit Mondorf. 

Division    Laboratory Mondorf. 

Evacuation  Ambulance  Companies  No  ..  63  and  6.5 Mondorf. 

Seventh    Engineer   Train Rumelange. 

Fifth  Military  Police Esch. 

Fifth  Mobile  Ordnance  Re])air  Shop Bettembourg. 

Fifth  Mobile  Veterinary   Section Esch. 

U.  S.  Army  Post  Office'  No.  74.5 Esch. 

Sales  Commissary  Unit  No.  302,  QMC Esch. 

Clothing  Unit  No.  304,  QMC Esch. 

Clothing  and  Bath  Unit  No.  323,  QMC Esch. 

Salvage  Unit  No.  301,  QMC Esch. 

Mobile  Laundry  Company  No.  319,  QMC Esch. 

Bakery  Company  No.  322,  QMC Esch. 

Service  Park  Units  No.  322,  393  and  395 Esch. 

Railhead  Supply  Detachment,  QMC Esch. 

Division   Casual   Detachment Beles. 


360  History  of  the  Fifth.  Division 


ST.  MIHIEL  BATTLEFIELD  MONUMENTS  OF  THE  FIFTH  DIVISION 

1.  On  Hie  northern  side  of  Tliiaiicuurt-Ki-i^nicville  road,  about  200  meters  north  of  IJegnieville. 

Inscription: 

This  monmnent  marks  the  jiiiiipinfr-ofl'  tniich  of  \\w  Sth  U.  S.  Division  in  the  St. 
Mihiel  Drive,  September  12,  lUlS,  Major  G<'neral  John  E.  MeMalion,  Commanding. 

2.  At  eastern  exit  of  \'ieville-en-Haye  on  north  side  of  road. 

Inscription: 

Vieville-en-Hayc,  ca|)tiire(l  liy  tlie  5th  U.  S.  Division  in  the  St.  Mihiel  Drive, 
September  12.  1018.  On  tliis  date  the  front  line  of  the  Sth  Division  was  established 
aljout  three  kilometers  north  of  this  point. 

3.  On  northern  side  Metz  highway,  about  200  meters  west  of  Met?.  Bridge. 

Inscription: 

This  monument  marks  the  spot  where  a  brigade  headquarters  of  the  5th  U.  S. 
Division  was  located  at  the  eonnnenecment  of  the  St.  Mihiel  Drive,  September  12, 
1918. 


FRAPELLE    BATTLEFIELD    MONUMENT    OF    THE    FIFTH    DIVISION 

In  Frapelle,  in  front  of  Hotel  de  Ville. 
Inscription: 

Frapelle,  captured  by  the  Sth  U.  S.  Division  ,\ugust  17,  1918,  marks  the  first 
offensive  operation  of  this  division.  This  was  the  first  offensive  operation  under- 
taken liy  American  troops  on  the  Vosges  front. 


MEUSE-ARGONNE   BATTLEFIELD   MONUMENTS   OF   THE   FIFTH    DIVISION 

1.  On  Ctinel-Nantillois  road  at  point  10,0-84..6. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Left  Hank  9tli  Infantry  Brigade,  Sth  U.  S.  Division,  after  relieving  80th  Division 
and  left  Battalion  IthDivision,  October  11-12,  1918. 

2.  Right  flank  Jum])ing-ofr  trench  for  Sth  U.  S.  Division,  October  U,  1918. 

2.  At  road  fork  at  point  07.5-84.0. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  This  point  marks  tlie  left  (west)  boundary  of  the  Sth  Division  in  the  attack  of 
October  It,  1918,  Meuse-y\rgonne  offensive.  The  National  Cemetery  is  located  on 
terrain  wrested  from  the  enemy  on  that  day  by  the  10th  Infantry  Brigade,  Sth 
Division. 

2.  Romagne  lying  outside  of  sector  of  the  Sth  Division  was  passed  by  the  lOtli 
Infantry  Brigade  and  outflanked  on  the  east  while  elements  of  the  7th  Engineers, 
Sth  Division,  acting  as  infantry,  entered  the  town  from  the  .south  at  11  A.  M., 
October  11,  1918,  and  assisted  the  advance  of  the  neighboring  division. 

3.  At  road  fork,  i)oint  10.0-85.0. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Cunel  c.iiitured  October  It,  1918,  by  60th  Infantry,  9th  Infantry  Brigade,  Sth 
Division,   Major  General  ,lohn    E.   McMahon,   Commanding. 

2.  Cunel,  post  of  command,  Sth  Division,  during  forced  crossing  of  Meuse,  Novem- 
ber 3-1,  1918,  Major  General  Hanson  E.  Ely,  Commanding. 

4..    At  point  08.()-87.0  at  road  fork. 
Inscriptions: 

1.  Major  James  D.  Rivet,  commanding  3rd  Battalion,  filst  Infantry,  heroically 
sacrificed  his  life  in  attack  on  Bois  des  Rappes,  October  IS,  1918. 

2.  Bois  des  Rappes  captured  by  11th  Infantry,  10th  Infantry  Brigade,  Sth  U.  S. 
Division,  Octol)er  21,  1918,  Meuse-Argonne  offensive. 

S.    On  BrieuUes-Dannevoux  roal  along  the  river  at  point  lG.3-83.8. 
Inscription: 

Right    Hank    of    10th    Brigade,   Sth    U.    S.    Division,    November    1,    1918;    southern 
boundary    Divisional  si-ctor  licfore  forced  passage  of  Mcu.se. 


Battlefield  Monuments  of  the  Fifth  Division  361 

MEUSE-ARGONNE  BATTI.EFIELD  MCJNUMENTS  OF  THE  FIFTH  DIVISION— C'o/i. 

6.  At  railroad  station  at  Brieulles. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Opposite  tliis  point  (itli  U.  S.  Infantry,  lOtli  Brigade,  Noveml^er  4,  1918,  forced 
passage  of  Meuse  and  Canal,  the  first  Allied  trc)o])s  to  cross  the  Meuse  in  final 
phase  of  Meuse-Argonne  oflfensive. 

2.  Opposite  this  point  Company  F,  7th  Engineers,  5th  U.  S.  Division,  threw  foot 
bridges  across  Meuse  and  Canal  for  assaulting  infantry,  November  3-4,  1918. 

3.  Simultaneously  with  passage  of  assault  battalions,  Companys  A  and  C,  7th  Engi- 
neers, threw  a  heavy  ponton  bridge  across  Meuse  and  Canal  opposite  this  point. 
November  4-5,  1918. 

7.  On  Einy-\'erdun  highway  at  point  l(i.()-86.7. 

Inscription: 

Daylight,  November  5,  1918,  found  bridgehead  over  Meuse  securely  established 
by  (ith  Infantry,  10th  Brigade,  5th  l'.  S.  Division,  extending  across  this  road  and 
including  the  Bois  de  Chatillon. 

8.  At  road  fork  into  \'ilosnes  on  \'erdun-Dun  highway  at  point  18.2-84.7. 

Inscription: 

Detachnunt  titli  Infantry,  10th  Brigade,  5th  U.  S.  Division,  on  November  (i,  1918, 
attacking  enemy  in  flank  and  rear,  forced  his  withdrawal  from  front  of  15th 
Colonial  Division,  French,  and  permitted  latter  to  cross  Meuse  and  enter 
Vilosnes. 

9.  On  Clery-le-Petit-Brieulles  road  at  jjoint   1 1.7-88.3. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Site  of  crossing  of  Meuse  Kivcr  and  Canal  liy  9th  Infantry  Brigade,  Brigadier 
General  ,T.  C.  Castner,  Connnanding,  November  4-5,  1918. 

2.  Foot  bridge  across  Meuse  River  and  Canal  for  9th  Infantry  Brigade.  Built  by 
Company  D,  7th  U.  S.  Engineers,  5th  I'.  S.  Division,  November  4-5,  1918. 

3.  Clery-le-Petit  captured  by  Companies  A  and  H,  (iOth  Infantry,  5th  U.  S.  Divi- 
sion, November  2,  1918. 

10.  On  Dun-sur-Meuse- Verdun  highway  at  point  15.5-88.2. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Site  of  foot  bridges  over  Meuse  and  Canal  for  foot  tro(ij)s,  9th  Infantry  Brigade, 
5th  U.  S.  Division,  constructed  by  Company  D,  7th  U.  S.  Engineers,  November 
4-5,  1918. 

2.  Cote  292  and  northern  slope  Cote  260  captured  by  troops  9th  Infantry  Brigade, 
5th   U.  S.   Division,  Lieut.   Col.   L.   A.  McClure,  Connnanding,   November  5,   1918. 

11.  On  Villers-devant-Dun-Doulcon  road  :it  jioint  10.7-90.0. 

ln.scriptions: 

1.  Turning  point  north  to  east,  5tli  V.  S.  Division,  in  forced  passage  of  Meuse, 
November  3,  1918. 

2.  Punchbowl,  taken  November  3,  191K,  by  1st  Battalion,  61st  Infantry,  Capt.  M.  E. 
Olmstead,  Commanding. 

12.  The  road  fork  on  Doulcon-Dun-sur-Mcuse  highway,  point  13.8-90.1. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Doulcon  captured  November  3,  1918,  liy  Company  C,  Gist  U.  S.  Infantry,  5th  U.  S. 
Division. 

2.  Reinforced  ponton  bridge  over  Meu.se  transporting  artillery  trains  and  supplies 
constructed  by  7th  U.  S.  Engineers  and  attached  troops,  November  5-6,  1918. 

13.  On  Sassey-Doulcon  road  at  point  14.2-91.6. 

Inscription: 

Northern  limit  advance  5th  U.  S.  Division  before  crossing  Meuse,  November  4-5, 
1918. 

14.  On  Dun-sur-Meuse-Verdun   highway   at   point   15.0-90.3. 

Inscriptions: 
y  1.  Dim-sur-Meuse,  captured  November  5,  1918,  by  2nd  Battalion,  61st  Infantry.  5th 

U.  S.  Division,  Major  .\.  N.  Stark,  Jr.,  Commanding. 
2.  Site  of  reinforced  ponton  liridge  over  Meuse  for  Artillery,  Trains  and  Supplies  of 
5th  U.  S.  Division  and  3rd  U.  S.  Corps,  constructed  by  7th  U.  S.  Engineers  and 
attached  troops,  November  5-6,  1918. 


362  Hintory  of  the  Fifth  Division 

MEUSE-ARGONNE  BATTLEFIKI.D  MONUMENTS  OF  THE  FIFTH  DIVISION— Con. 

15.  On  Dun-sur-Meuse- Verdun  highway  at  point  15.8-92..3. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Outpost  Gist  Infantry,  Sth  U.  S.  Division,  November  5-7,  1918. 

2.  Milly-devant-Diin  captured  liy  2nd  Battalion,  61st  Infantry,  5th   U.  S.  Division, 
Novemlier  5,  1918. 

16.  Large  monument  on  Cote  St.  Germain,  Cote  350. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  (South  face)   Murvaux,  most  advanced  P.  C.  5th  U.  S.  Division,  Major  General 
Hanson  E.  Ely,  Commanding.     November  11,  1918. 

2.  (North  face)    Units  of  5th   (Hed  Diamond)   Division: 

9th  Infantry  Brigade.  7th  Engineer  Regiment. 

10th  Infantry  Brigade.  9th  Field   Signal   Battalion 

3rd  Artillery  Brigade.  (Attached   Units). 

6th  Infantry  Regiment.  77th  .Artillery  Regiment. 

11th   Infantry  Regiment.  76th  Artillery  Regiment. 

60th  Infantry  Regiment.  13th  Artillery  Regiment. 
61st  Infantry   Regiment. 

3.  (West  face)   Cote  St.  Germain  captured  liy  troo])s   9th   U.   S.   Infantry   Brigade, 
Brigadier  General  .1.  C.  Castncr,  Coimnanding,  November  6,  1918. 

17.  At  cross  road  north  of  Brandeville  at  point  24.4-92.7. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  The  P.  C.  of  the  10th  Brigade,  5th  U.  S.  Division,  was  in  Brandeville  at  the  time 
of  armistice,  November  11,  1918. 

2.  Brandeville   and   surrounding   heights   captured    by    11th    Infantry,   10th    Brigade, 
5th  U.  S.  Division,  November  8,  1918. 

18.  At  Mouzay.     On  Mouzay-Dun-sur-Meuse  highway  at  point  17.6-98.8. 

Inscriptions: 

1.  Mouzay  captured   by   Companies   L  and   M,   61st   Infantry,   5th   U.   S.   Division, 
November  9,  1918,  Captain  C.  E.  Martin,  Commanding. 

2.  700  French  women  and  children  liberated  by  5th  U.  S.  Division,  November  9,  1918. 

19.  On  road  running  south  out  of  Jametz  at  point  329..5-94.5. 

Inscription: 

Jametz  captured  by  10th  Brigade,  5th  Division,  November  9,  1918,  Brigadier 
General  Paul  B.  Malone,  Connnanding.  Marks  furthest  eastward  advance  of  the 
.'\llied  Armies  in  the  Meuse-,\rgonne  offensive. 

20.  On  road  running  northeast  out  of  Jametz  at  point  329.5-95.7. 

Inscription: 

This  point  marks  the  outpost  line  6th  Infantry,  Colonel  H.  J.  Hunt,  Commanding, 
10th  Infantry  Brigade,  5th  U.   S.  Division,  at  time  the  armistice  was  declared, 
11  hours,  November  11,  1918. 
On  red  diamond  tablet  appears:  "Major  General  H.  E.  Ely,  Commanding." 

21.  At  cross  roads  328.2-96.7. 

Inscription: 

Remoiville  and  I.ouppy  captured  by  11th  Infantry,  Colonel  R.  H.  Peck,  Com- 
manding, 10th  Brigade,  5th  U.  S.  Division,  November  9,  1918,  marking  the  most 
advanced  line  of  the  American  Army  at  the  time  of  the  armistice,  11  hours, 
November  11,  1918. 

22.  On  the  l.ouppy-Juvigny   road  at  point  26.4-97.6. 

Inscription: 

Farthest  advance  60th  Infantry,  Colonel  F.  B.  Hawkins,  Commanding,  at  time  of 
armistice,  November  11,  1918,  5th  II.  S.  Division. 

23.  On  hill  325.8-98.2. 

Inscription: 

Farthest  advance  9th  Infantry  Brigade,  5th  U.  S.  Division,  November  11,  1918, 
Brigadier  General  J.  C.  Castner,  Commanding.  • 

24.  At  point  23.8-99.7. 

Inscription: 

Farthest  advance  61st  Infantry,  5th  U.  S.  Division,  November  11,  1918,  Colonel 
P.  B.  Peyton,  Commanding. 


The  Fifth  Division  Crest  363 

FIFTH  DIVISION  CREST 

General  Use: 

To  adorn  Banners,  Plaques,  Stationerj%  Programs  of  all  kinds 
(for  entertainments,  dances,  athletic  meets,  etc.)  ;  Covers  of  Division 
Publications,  such  as  the  Division  History,  and  any  other  appropri- 
ate use. 

Description: 

An  American  Eagle  with  widespread  wings  and  fighting  spirit 
displays  upon  his  breast  a  vermilion  diamond  upon  which  is  inscribed 
a  gold  figiu'e  5.  The  eagle  stands  against  a  black  background  held 
by  a  circular  border.  A  ribbon  passes  through  the  lower  part  of  the 
design  bearing  the  words  "The  Fifth  Division,  U.  S.  A."  Above  the 
eagle's  head  is  a  ribbon  bearing  the  words  "  WE  WILL." 

The  eagle  is  conventional  in  design,  its  head  is  turned  to  the  left 
with  an  expression  of  determination.  The  wings  are  widely  spread 
so  that  the  tijjs  are  almost  on  a  horizontal  line  with  the  top  of  the 
head.  The  legs  are  spread  out.  The  left  talons  clutching  a  gold 
laurel  branch  and  the  right  talons  clutching  seven  gold  arrows.  The 
tail,  shaped  like  an  Egyptian  fan,  extends  between  the  legs  just  a 
trifle  lower  than  the  talons.  The  distance  from  the  top  of  the  head 
to  the  end  of  the  tail  is  two-thirds  of  the  spread  of  the  wings.  The 
color  is  gold  with  touches  of  black  and  white. 

On  the  eagle's  breast  is  the  central  motif,  a  vermilion  diamond. 
The  center  of  the  diamond  coincides  with  the  center  of  the  eagle's 
breast.  The  length  of  the  diamond  is  three-fifths  of  the  distance  from 
head  to  tail;  its  width  is  two-thirds  the  length.  On  the  diamond  is 
centered  a  gold  figiu'e  5  of  Arabesque  character.  The  diamond 
itself  is  bordered  by  a  gold  outline. 

The  background,  a  jet  black,  is  held  by  a  circular  border.  The 
distance  from  the  center  of  the  diamond  to  the  eagle's  brow  is  the 
radius  for  the  background.  A  heavy  white  line  circles  the  black; 
then  the  border  of  black  laiu'el  leaves  with  gold  berries  on  a  vermilion 
field.  The  width  of  this  border  is  one-fifth  the  width  of  the  diamond. 
A  white  line  somewhat  wider  than  the  one  previously  mentioned  cir- 
cles the  border  and  is  itself  outlined  by  a  thin  black  line. 

The  ribbon  in  the  lower  part  of  the  design  is  twice  the  width  of 
the  border.  The  upper  edge  of  the  ribbon  is  separated  from  the  point 
of  the  diamond  by  a  thin  black  line.  The  central  part  of  the  ribbon 
forms  a  semicircle  about  the  eagle's  legs.  The  ends  fold  out  to  right 
and  left,  breaking  through  the  border,  folding  in  and  out  again  on 
the  horizontal  axis,  in  the  meanwhile  converging  to  a  point.     Where 


36i  Hisiory  of  the  Fifth  Division 

the  ril)l)Oii  forms  the  semicircle  are  tlie  words  "Fifth  Division"  in 
black  Roman  capitals.  The  first  fold  on  the  left  bears  the  word 
"The."  the  fold  on  the  right  bears  the  letters  "U.  S.  A."  The  ribbon 
is  white  witli  touches  of  gold  and  red  where  the  folds  break  through 
the  l)order. 

Directly  above  the  eagle's  head  and  breaking  through  the  border 
is  a  pike  floating  a  ribbon  that  bears  the  words  "We  Will."  This  rib- 
bon, smaller  than  the  lower  ribbon,  folds  into  full  width  over  the  head 
touching  it  witli  the  bottom  edge.  It  then  folds  back  to  the  left  and 
sweeps  around  the  eagle's  head,  finally  ending  in  an  oval  curve  on  the 
border. 

The  pike  is  vertical  and  is  only  visible  aliove  and  below  the  design. 

The  design  for  the  Division  Crest  above  described  was  submit- 
ted by  Sergeant  Willard  B.  Prince  of  the  G-2  Section,  General  Staff, 
this  Division. 


OFFICERS   WHO   HAVE    SERVED   OVERSEAS   WITH 
THE  FIFTH  DIVISION 

Note:  The  periods  during'  wliich  an  officer  was  on  duty  with  the 
Division  are  indicated  as  follows:  1,  Anould  Sector;  2.  St.  Die  Sec- 
tor; 3,  St.  ]Mihiel  Operation;  4,  First  Phase  Meuse-Argonne  Opera- 
tion; 5,  Second  Phase  Meuse-Argonne  Oj^eration;  6,  Thiaucourt 
Sector,  between  September  17-18th  and  XoAember  ll-18th;  7,  Army 
of  Occupation. 

Abbreviations  used  are  as  follows:  Jd,  joined  the  unit  or  Divi- 
sion; Att,  attached;  KIA,  killed  in  action;  MIA,  missing  in  action; 
WIA,  wounded  in  action;  DW,  died  of  wounds;  GIA.  gassed  in 
action;  Evac  sk,  evacuated  sick;  Xot  evac,  not  evacuated;  Ret,  re- 
turned to  duty;  Trfd,  transferred;  Det,  detached;  Dr,  dropped;  DS 
Div.  Hq.  on  detached  service  at  Division  Headfjuarters;  DSjNI, 
awarded  Distinguished  Service  iVIedal;  DSC,  awarded  Distinguished 
Service  Cross. 

The  roster  has  been  brought  up  to  date  of  June  1st,  1919. 

DIVISION  HEADQUARTERS 
Major  Generals: 

Ely,  Hanson  E.— Jd.  Oct.  17/18;  i,  5,  7;  Commanding  Division;  DSM. 

McMahon,  John  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i;  Division  Commander;  Trfd.  Oct.  17/18. 

Brigadieb  Genehai.: 

Hlckok,  Howard  R.— Att.  June  8  18;  1;  Chief  of  Staff;  Det.  July  19/18. 

Colonels  : 

Adams,  Lewis  H.   (Engrs.) — Division  Engineer  to  Sept.  23/18. 

Corey,  J.  B.  W.   (F.A.)— Att.  Dec.  30/18;  Acting  Division  Inspector;  Det.  Dec.  31/18. 

Ingram,  Ralph  E.  (G.S.)— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  Chief  of  Staff;  Trfd.  June  8  '18. 

McBride,  Robert  B.  (I.G.)— Att.  Oct.  2/18;  Acting  Division  Inspector;  Det.  Oct.  11/18. 

Paules,  Earle  G.  (Engrs.)— Division  Engineer  from  Sept.  23   18;  DSM. 

Pierson,  Robert  H.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in   U.  S.;   1,  2,  3,  4,  5.  7;  Division  Surgeon;   Trfd.   Dec. 

27/18;  DSM. 
Trott,  Clement  A.  (G.S.)— .Id.  July  24/18;  2,  3.  4,  5,  7;  Chief  of  Staff;  DSM. 
Vaux,  Carey  ,1.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  2/19;  7;  Division  Surgeon. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Allen,  Gilbert  M.  (Inf.)— Jd.  Aug.  1  '18;  2,  3,  4,  5.  7;  Division  Machine  Gun  Officer. 
Barnes,  John  B.  (G.S.)— Jd.  June  8/18;  1,  2,  3;  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-3;  Trfd.  Sept. 

20/18. 
Clendenin,  William  H.   (G.S.)— .Td.  in   V.  S.;  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-2;  Trfd.  July 

19/18. 
Cole,  Herbert  C.  (M.C.)— Jd.  May  26   19;  7;  Division  Sanitary  Inspector. 
Cosgrave,  P.  James  (J.A.G.D.) — Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Division  Judge  Advocate. 
Cowles,  W.  H.  (I.G.)— Jd.  Jan.  29/19;  7;  Division  Inspector. 

Dabney,  Ward  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Division  Quartermaster;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 
Ely,  E.  J.  (G.S.)— Jd.  Jan.  20/19;  7;  A,s.sistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1. 
Fries,  C.  S.  (A.G.D.)— Att.  Aug.  30/18;  Assistant  G-3;  Det.  Sept.  12/18. 
Grimes,  William  JI.  (Cav.) — .\tt.  May  fi/19;  Division  Inspector  of  Anim.il  Transportation 


366  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

DIVISION  HEADqVAHTERS— Continued 

Lieutenant  Colonels: — Continued 

Gutensohn,  Alvin  G.  (S.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  7/8;  4.,  5;  Division  Signal  Officer;  Trfd.  Nov.  20/18. 
Hodges,  Courtney   H.    (Inf.) — Att.   March  27/19;   7;  DivLsion  Inspector  of  Small  Arms 

Practice. 
Kieffer,   George   D.    (M.C.) — Jd.    March   27/19;    7;    Division    Sanitary    Inspector;    Trfd. 

May  25/19. 
Kingman,  Ralph  W.  (G.S.)— Jd.  Sept.  19/18;  i,  5,  7;  Assistant  Chief  of  Stafif,  G-3. 
Leonard,  Charles  F.  (S.C.)— Jd.  ui  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Division  Signal  Officer;  Trfd.  Sept.  25/18. 
McNaniara,  Wallace  (I.G.)— Jd.  Oct.  11/18;  4;  Division  In.spector;  Trfd.  Oct.  31/18. 
Meals,  Charles  A.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2,  3,  i,  5;  Division  Quartermaster;  Trfd. 

Nov.  21/18. 
Parsons,  Herbert   (S.C.)— Jd.  June  8/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  A.ssistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-2; 

Trfd.  Dec.  18/18. 
Pcalxxly,  Jacob  C.   R.   (I.G.)— Jd.  Nov.  2/18;  5,  7;  Division  Inspector;  Trfd.  Dec.  29/18. 
IVck,  iJobert  G.  (I.G.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Division  Inspector;  Trfd.  Sept.  25/18. 
Randolph,  John  (Inf.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1 ;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 
Reynolds,  Steplien  C.  (Inf.)— Jd.  Oct.  16/18;  4,  5,  7;  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1;  Trfd. 

Jan.  21/19. 
Schrader,  Lee  B.  (D.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  19/18;  7;  Division  Dental  Surgeon. 
Scott.  Jolin  (S.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  27,  1919;  7;  Division  Signal  Officer. 
Shallenberger,  Martin  C.  (G.S.)— Jd.  June  1/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-1; 

Trfd.  Oct.  15/18. 
Smith,  Kerwin  T.  (Inf.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-3;  Trfd.  June  9/19. 
Williams,  Roger  H.  (A.G.D.)— Jd.  Dec.  23/18;  7;  Assistant  Chief  of  Staff,  G-2. 
Wood,  David  P.  (Inf.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Division  Adjutant. 


Majors:  f      ~' 

Allen,  William  D.  (M.C.)— Att.  Feb.  7/19;  7;  Division  Welfare  Officer;  Det.  March  25/19. 

Booltmyer,  Ralph  H.  (M.C.)— .\tt.  Dec.  10/18;  7;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Det. 
May  23/19. 

Byers,  Rufus  A.  (A.G.D.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Assistant  to  Division  Adjutant. 

Cain,  David  E.  (F.  A.)— Att.  Aug.  1/18;  2,  3;  Assistant,  G-3;  Det.  Oct.  1/18. 

Chambers,  Frederick  L.  (C.W.S.)— Jd.  April  19/19;  7;  Division  Gas  Officer. 

Davies,  Ray  H.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Trfd. 
Dec.  17/18. 

Davis,  Ora  P.  (V.C.)— Jd.  March  23/19;  7;  Division  Veterinarian. 

Dick,  Cliester  J.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Division  Finance  Officer. 

Doolittle,  Julius  T.  A.  (F.A.)— Att.  Dec.  31/18;  7;  Assistant  Inspector  of  Animal  Trans- 
portation. 

Eastman,  Clyde  L.  (Inf.)— Att.  July  18/18;  2;  As.sistant  Signal  Officer;  Det.  Sept.  15/18. 

Hall,  Henry  C.   (S.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  5/18;  3;  Assistant  Signal  Officer;  Trfd.  Sept.  2fi/18. 

Hayes,  Thomas  G.  (Ord.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Division  Ordnance  Officer;  Trfd.  Sept. 
"  26/18. 

Johnston,  Alexander  R.  (J. A.G.D.)— Jd.  Oct.  14/18;  4,  5,  7;  A.ssistant  Judge  Advocate; 
Trfd.  March  31/19. 

Lukens,  Philip  J.   (M.C.)— Att.  April  10/19;  7;  Division  Recruiting  Officer. 

I,und,  Frank  J.  (Inf.)— Att.  March  8/19;  Division  Welfare  Officer. 

McCook,  Philip  J.  (A.G.D.)— Jd,  Sept.  20/18;  Assistant,  G-3;  Trfd.  Oct.  28/18. 

McDonald.  Otis  H.   (D.C.)— .Td.  Oct.  2/18;  4;  Division  Dental  Surgeon;  Trfd.  Oct.  26/18. 

Namm,  B.  H.  (C.W.S.)— Jd.  Oct.  18/18;  5.  7;  Division  Gas  Officer;  Trfd.  Dec.  8/18. 

Neil,  T.  F.   (M.C.)— Att.  Aug.  1/18;  2;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Det.  Aug.  22/18. 

O'Mahoney.  J.  W.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  March  27/19;  7;  Division  Motor  Tran.sport  Officer. 

Parker.  Homer  C.  (J. A.G.D.)— Jd.  Feb.  11/19;  7;  A.ssistant  Judge  Advocate. 

Rees.  George  W.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  29/18;  4.  5,  7;  Division  Quartermaster. 

Small,  Deane  B.   (S.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  28/18;  4,  7;  Division  Signal  Officer;  Trfd.  Feb.  6/19. 

Stewart,  James  (Ord.)— .Td.  Nov.  7/18;  5.  7;  Division  Ordnance  Officer. 

Wyncken,  Henry  O.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Trfd. 
Oct.  22/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division  367 

DIVISION  HEADQUARTERS— fo«((ft«frf 

Captains: 

Benton,   C.   C.    (Ord.)— Jd.   Aug.   1/18;   2,  3,  4,   5,   7;    Assistant   Ordnance   Officer;   Trfd. 

Dec.  10/18. 
Bertram,  Frederick  D.  (V.C.)— Att.  Aug.  5/18;  2;  Division  Veterinarian;  Dtt.  Aug.  21/18. 
Bird,  Owen  R.  (M.T.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;'4.,  5,  T;  Division  -Motor  Transjxjrt  Officer. 
Bliss,  J.  C.  (Inf.)— Att.  Dec.  30/18;  7;  Division  Athletic  Officer;  Det.  April  1(3/19. 
Boyle,  Matthew  E.  (M.T.C.)— Jd.  May  13/19;  7;  .\ssistant  Motor  Transport  Officer. 
Bowen,  Frank  h.  (Inf.)— Att.  May  8/19;  7;  Assistant,  G-1. 
Bremer,  L.  J.  (Q.M.C.)-^d.  Dec.  9/18;  7;  Assistant  to  Quartermaster. 
Brimmer,  Arthur  L.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  .\ssistant  to  Quartermaster;  Trfd.  Sei>t. 

15/18. 
Brown,  Solomon  K.  (Inf.)— Jd.  June  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7;  Assistant,  G-3;  Trfd.  Fel).  <>/19. 
Burgess,  Frederick  V.  (Inf.)— Jd.  Jan.  21/19;  7;  Assistant,  G-3;  Det.  June  1/19. 
Burk,  Aubrey  H.  (D.C.)— Att.  May  13/19;  7;  Assistant  Dental  Surgeon;  Det.  May  22/19. 
Butin,  George  E.   (V.C.)— Jd.  March  23/19;  7;  Assistant  X'eterinarian. 
Carter,  Fred  A.  (F.A.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Assistant,  G-2;  Trfd.  Aug.  2(i/18. 
Cole,  Wallace  (M.C.)— Att.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Det.  July  1/18. 
Cox,  Ray  H.  (M.C.)— Att.  June  1/18;  1,2;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Det.  Aug.  22/18. 
Dennis,  R.  C.  (C.W.S.)— Jd.  Dec.  21/18;  7;  Assistant  Gas  Officer;  Trfd.  Jan.  18/19. 
Devereux,  Leslie  W.   (F.A.) — Jd.  in  IJ.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Major  General 

McMahon;  Trfd.  Oct.  17/18. 
De  Wolf,  Charles  A.  (D.C.)— Jd.  Ai)ril  7   19;  7;  Assistant  to  Dental  Surgeon. 
Dickson,  Raymond   (F.A.)— Jd.  Aug.  19/18;  3;  Assistant  Inspector;  Trfd.  Sept.  25/18. 
Elkins,  John  W.  (Inf.)— Att.  Feb.  22/19;  7;  Assi-stant  Inspector. 
Fisher,  A.  M.  (C.W.S.)— Jd.  June  1/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Division  Gas  Officer;  Trfd.  Dec. 

21/18. 
Fraser,  Harry  L.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  t,  5;  Assistant  to  Quartermaster;   KIA 

Nov.  10/18. 
Glasgow,  Lawrence  B.  (Inf.) — Jd.  Jan.  2/19;  7;  Secretary  to  General  Staff. 
Green,  George  A.  (M.C.) — Jd.  Aug.  14/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Assistant  to  Sanitary  Inspector. 
Greer,  Frank  U.  (Inf.)— Att.  April  21/19;  7;  Division  Athletic  Officer. 
Haines,  George  (F.A.)— Att.  July  2/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  A.ssistant,  G-1;  Det.  Dec.  28/18. 
Hall,  Drew  B.   (Q.M.C.)— Att.  Sept.  28/18;  4;  Assistant  Quartermaster;  Det.  Oct.  25/18. 
Hamilton,  Samuel   (M.C.)— Att.  Aug.  20/18;  3;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Det.  Sept. 

18/18. 
Hanlen,  John  G.  L.  (Inf.)— Att.  Feb.  24/19;  7;  Division  School  Officer. 
Hayden,  Claude  J.   (Inf.)— Att.  March  13/19;  7;  Agricultural  School  Officer;   Det.  May 

15/19. 
Healy,  Joseph  P.   (Inf.)- Jd.  Sept.  22/18;  4,  5,  7;  Remount  Officer;  Trfd.  May  29/19. 
Hunt,  James  P.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  28/18;  4,  5,  7;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Trfd. 

Dec.  17/18. 
Knapp,  Willard  A.   (Engrs.)— Att.  July  13/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Secretary  to  General  Staflf; 

Det.  April  1.5/19. 
Knight,  Thomas  A.  (A.G.D.)— Jd.  June  8/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Secretary  to  General  Staff;  Trfd. 

Oct.  22/18. 
Lang,  Nathaniel  (M.C.)— Att.  Feb.  12/19;  7;  Attending  Surgeon. 
Lill,  Joe  G.  (Inf.)— Att.  March  4/19;  7;  A.  E.  F.  Agricultural  School  Officer;  Det.  March 

24/19. 
Lind.sey,  Henry  C.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5.  7;  Assistant  to  Quartermaster. 
Livermore,  H.  (C.W.S.)^d.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5,  7;  Division  Gas  Officer;  Trfd.  Dec.  2/18. 
Luce,  Daniel  S.   (V.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  12/18;  3,  4,  5,  7;  Division  Veterinarian;  Trfd.  April 

8/19. 
McCracken,  William  G.  (Inf.)— .\tt.  Jan.  8/19;  7;  Assistant  Motor  Transport  Officer. 
Muchmore,  C.  E.  (Inf.)— Att.  Jan.  19/19;  7;  Assistant,  G-1. 
Nickerson,  Harold  L.  (Inf.) — Jd.  April  20/19;  Division  Personnel  Adjutant. 
Norris,  George  R.   (Inf.)— Jd.   Aug.  6/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Division  Statistical  Officer;  Trfd 

Dec.  19/18. 
Payne,  Howard  B.  (Inf.)— ,\tt.  June  6/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Assistant,  G-1;  Trfd.  Jan.  2/19. 
Pots,  Frank  G.  (A.G.D.)— Jd.  July  15/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Assistant,  G-2. 


368  Histori/  of  Ihc  Fifth  Division 

DniSIOX  HEADyUAKTEUS— t'oH^Hdc,/ 

Captains: — '  'unliiiiifd 

Rowan,  Hugh  W.  (C.W.S.)— Att.  Aug.  22/18;  Division  Gas  Officer;  Dot.  Aug.  31/18. 

liowlev,  Benjamin  H.   (M.C.) — Jd.  Nov.  0/18;  7;  .Vssistant  to  Division  Surgeon. 

Siuiliert,  Hiciiard  H.  (r..\.)— Att.  May  1/19;  7;  Division  Entertainuunf  Officer;  Det.  May 

22/10. 
Smitli,  Andrew  J.   (t'liajilain) — Id.  May  8/10;  7;  Division  Cliajilain. 
Snyder,  William.!.  (Engrs.)— Att.  Nov.  1/18;  .5,  7;  Assi.stant,  (i-:5. 
Stickney,  Wliitman  G.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Trfd 

Oct.  3/18. 
Thornliill,  John  B.   (Inf.)— Att.  .Vpril  i/lO;  7;  Assistant  Judge  .Vdvocate. 
Trasli,  I.eo  S.   (M.C.)— Att.  Feb.  .5/10;  7;  Division  Urologist. 
Watson,  Arthur  P.   (Inf.)^,  5,  7;  Aide  de  Caniji  to  Major  General  Ely. 
Wilcox.  E.  A.  (C.W.S.)— Jd.  Jan.  1/10;  Division  Gas  Officer;  Trfd.  April  17/11). 
Womacli,  Horace  O.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in   V.  S.;   1,  2;  Assistant  (Quartermaster;  Trfd.  Sepl. 

10/18. 


First  Lieutenants: 

Albriglit,  Raymond  W.  (Inf.)— Att.  Feb.  12/10;  7;  Assistant  to  Quartermaster. 
Allen,  Chester  (Inf.)— Att.  Aug.  27/18;  3,  4,  5;  Assistant,  G-2;  Det.  Nov.  28/18. 
Ash,  Roy  F.  (Inf.)— Att.  Aug.  20/18;  3,  4,  7;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Major  General  MeMahon; 

in  charge  of  Message  Center;  Det.  April  28/19. 
Beilharz,  Alfred  J.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.,  5,  7;  Assistant  to  Quartermaster; 

Trfd.  Dec.  7/18. 
Baldwin,  Charles  F.   (Inf.)— Att.  Dec.  20/18;  7;  Zone  Major;  Det.   May  22/10. 
Bronson.   Richardson    (C.W.S.)— Jd.    Aug.   31/18;   3,   4,   5;    Assistant    Gas   Officer;    Trfd. 

Nov.  18/18. 
Bueliley,  Delmar  M.   (D.C.)— .\tt.   Aug.  31/18;  .3,  4,  .5,  7;  Division   Dental  Surgeon;  Det. 

Jan.  30/19. 
Burlihart,  Merle  R.   (Inf.)— Att.  June  17/18;  1,  2,  .3,  4,  .5;  Assistant,  G-1 ;  Det.  Nov.  6/18. 
Carr,  Gregory  J.   (Chaplain)— Jd,  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3,  4,  5,  7;  Division  Cliaplain;  Trfd.  Feb. 

26/10. 
Cawthon,  J.  L.   (C.W.S,)— Jd.  Jan.  2/19;  7;  Assistant  Gas  Officer. 
Dierks,   Walter   R.    (V.C.)— Jd.   in   U.   S.;   1,  2,  3,  4,   5,   7;   Division    Veterinarian;   Trfd. 

April  1/19. 
Erne.st,  Gifiord   (Chaplain) — Id.  July  1/18;  1,  2;  Division  Cli.i|)l,iin  ;  Trfd.  Aug.  .5/18. 
Finnegan.  E.  J.  (Chaplain) — Td.  Fel).  24/19;  7;  Division  Chaplain;  Trfd.  May  5/19. 
Fislier,  Max  A.  (Inf.)— Att.  Fel).  11/19;  7;  Division  Entertainment  Officer. 
Flack.  Cliarles  E.   (Cav.)— Att.  March  22/19;  7;  R.  R.  &  C.  Officer. 

Fox,  William  (S.C.)— Att.  Se])t.  10/18;  4,  .5,  7;  Division  Photograjilier ;  Det.  Jan.  27   19. 
Garett,  H.  L.  (Inf.)— Att.  March  15/19;  7;  A.s.sistant  to  Atliletic  Officer;  Det.  May  22/19. 
Garver,  Milton   (C.I.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Interpreter;  Trfd.  Dec.  fi/18. 
Goldens,  Edward  F.   (Inf.)— ,Td.  March  21/10;  7;   A.  E.  F.   Rifle  Instructor;  Trfd.   April 

28/10. 
Hand,  Thomas  E.  (M.C.)— Alt.  March  4/19;  7;  .\ssistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Det.  March 

2/19. 
Harness.  R.  W.   (F.A.)— Att.  Aug.  26/18;  3;  As.sistant  Gas  Officer;  Det.  Sept.  30/18. 
Harris,  William  I,.   (Inf.)— Att.  March  20/10;  7;  Commanding  Railhead  Detachment. 
Harri.snn,  John  W.   (M.C.)— .\tt.  Oct.  26/18;  5;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Det.  Nov. 

9/19. 
Havens,  Herbert  S.   (Inf.)— Att.  Aug.  27/18;  3,  4,  5,  7;  Charge  of  Message  Center;  Det. 

April  .30/19. 
Hawkin,s,  Benjamin   A.    (Inf.)  — Att.   March  31/19;  7;  Assistant   to   .\tldetic  Officer;   Det. 

May  22/19. 
Havnes',  Melvin  R.  (Inf.)— Att.  March  17/10;  A.ssistant,  G-1;  Det.  May  22/10. 
Hopi>er,  Ira  C.  (F.A.)— Att.  March  13/10;  7;  Assi.stant  to  School  Officer;  Det.  May  22/19. 
Hunter,  R.  C.  (Engrs.)— Att.  June  1/18;  1,  2;  Assistant  Gas  Officer;  Det.  Aug.  21/18. 
Josey,  E.  P.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  May  6   19;  7;  Assistant  to  Quartermaster. 
I.egi'.re,  Harry  W.  (Marines)— .Id.  July  1/18;  1,  2;  Assistant  Gas  Officer;  Trfd.  Aug.  16/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  icith  the  Fifth  Division  369 

DIVISION  HEADQUARTERS— C'on^/nHf'rf 

First  Lieutenants : — Continued 

Lindgren,  Harry  A.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd-  Sept.  28/18;   l,  5;  Assistant  to  Quarterniaster;  Trfd. 

Nov.  15/18. 
Lindsay,  Hal   (Inf.) — Alt.  April  12   19;  7;  Assistant  to  .Judge  Advocate. 
McDonald,  Clyde  B.  (Inf.)— Att.  Dec.  17/18;  7;  A.  E.  F.  Rifle  In.structor;  Det.  May  22/19. 
Maniey,  W.  E.  (Inf.)— Att.  Marcli  22/19;  7;  Director  Division  Show. 
Manning,  Blagden   (F.A.)— Att.  April  26/19;  7;  Assistant  R.R.  &  C.  Officer;  Det.  May 

17/19. 
Marcus,  C.  P.  (V.C.)— Att.  Aug.  5/18;  3,  4;  Assistant  Veterinarian;  Det.  Oct.  30/18. 
Meyer,  Julian  A.  S.   (Inf.)— Att.  July  26/18;  3,  4,  7;  R.R.  &  C.  Officer;  Det.  Dec.   19/18 
Moyer,  C.  S.  (C.W.S.)— Jd.  Aug.  31/18;  3,  4;  A.ssi.stant  Gas  Officer;  Trfd.  Oct.  30/18. 
Pearce,  Jesse  S.   (Cliaplain)— Jd.  Oct.  9/18:  4,  5,  7;  Division  Cliajilain;  Trfd.  Feb.  22/l!y 
Peters,  Homer  C.  (Inf.)— Att.  Oct.  9/18;  4;  Liaison  Officer;  Det.  Oct.  30/18. 
Pierce,  Joseph  E.  (Inf.) — Jd.  Jan.  25/19;  7;  Division  Entertainment  Officer;  Died  Ajjril 

23/19. 
Proper,  Byron  S.  (San.  C.)— Jd.  Aug.  1/18;  2;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Trfd.  Sept. 

2/18.  " 
RajTiesford,  R.   P.    (Engrs.)— Att.  Aug.   1/18;   2,  3,  4;   .Vssistant  Gas   Officer;    Det.   Oct. 

"  30/18. 
Renne,  Frank  .\.  (V.C.) — Att.  .\pril  18/19;  7;  Assistant  Veterinarian. 
KejTiolds,  Robert  P.  (F.A.)— Att.  Dec.  6/18;  7;  Assistant,  G-1;  Det.  Dec.  14/18. 
Roberts,  Lawrence  B.  (Inf.)— Att.  Oct.  1/18;  4,  5;  Liaison  Officer;  Det.  Nov.  30/18. 
Kudolph,  Myron  P.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  11/18;  7;  Assistant  to  Division  Surgeon;  Trfd.  Jan. 

11/19. 
Slingluff,  F.  J.  (Ord.)— Att.  Jan.  10/19;  7;  Assistant  Ordnance  Officer;  Det.  Feb.  2/19. 
Stanley,  Ja(k  M.  (A.G.D.) — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Assistant  Statistical  Officer;  Trfd. 

April  30/19. 
Watts,  George  D.  (Inf.)— Att.  Jan.  9/19;  7;  A.ssi.stant,  G-1;  Det.  Jan.  28/19. 
Wliittckcn,  W.  H.  (F.A..)— Att.  April  5/19;  7;  Assistant  to  School  Officer;  Det.  May  22/19. 
Yolio,  Charles  E.   (M.C.)— Att.  Aug.  20/18;  7;  A.ssistant  Surgeon;  Det.  .\ug.  31/18. 

Second  Lieutenants; 

Beckerman,  Phillip  (Inf.)— Att.  Dec.  8   18;  7;  Division  Billeting  Officer;  Det.  March  24/19. 
Brant,  Charles  W.  (F.A.)— Att.  May  2/19;  7;  Division  Entertainment  Officer;  Det.  May 

22/19. 
Byron,  Robert  S.   (Inf.)— Att.  March  27/19;  7;  Division  Billeting  Officer. 
Courtney.  Jesse  E.   (Inf.) — Att.  March  20/19;  Assistant  Personnel  .\djutant. 
Dainsgaard,  .\rthur  C.  (Inf.)— .\tt.  April  28/19;  7;  .\ssistant,  G-1;  Det.  May  22/19. 
Daniels,  Kenneth   (Engrs.) — Id.  Aug.  29/18;  3,  4;  Camouflage  Officer;  Trfd."  Oct.  30/18. 
Druhot,  Harley  H.  (Inf.)— Att.  May  5/19;  7;  Assistant  R.R.  &  C.  Officer;  Det.  Mav  22/19. 
Estep,  Willis  S.   (Inf.)— Att.  March  14/19;  7;  Duty  with  Railroad  Detachment;  Det.  Mav 

22/19. 
Everett,  Robert  M.   (Q.M.C.)— .Id.  Oct.  17/18;  4,  5,  7;  A.ssistant  to  Quartermaster;  Trfd. 

April  2/19. 
Flothow,  Paul  G.   (Inf.)— ,Td.  March  20/19;  7;  Assistant  Personnel  .Vdjutant;  Trfd.  April 

23/19. 
Clerlach,  F.  W.   (Inf.)— Att.  .\pril  13/19;  7;  .\ssistant  to  Motor  Transport  Officer. 
Harry,  Stacey  P.  (Inf.)— March  11/19;  7;  Director  of  "Fifth  Division  Diamond." 
Horstmann,  Leon  L.   (C.I.) — .Id,  in   U.  S. ;   1,  2,  3,  7;   Division   Casual   Detachment  Com- 
mander. 
Hughes,  D.   E.    (Q.M.C.)— Jd.   Dec.   21/18;   7;   Assistant   to  Quartermaster;   Trfd.   March 

18/19. 
Johnson,  Samuel  B.   (Inf.)— Jd.  July  11/18;  1,  2,  .3,  4,  5,  7;  Charge  Division  Post  Office. 
Laird,  E.  R.  (Engrs.)— Att.  Aug.  1/18;  2,  3;  .Assistant  Gas  Officer;  Det.  Oct.  5/18. 
Lockwood,  K.  E.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  26/18;  5,  7;  A.ssistant  to  Finance  Officer. 
Lynch,  Edward  F.   (Q.M.C.)-^d.  Dec.  8/18;  7;  As.sistant  to  Quartermaster;  Trfd.  May 

21/19. 
McBane,  E.  P.   (V.C.)— Att.  May  9/19;  7;  Assistant  to  Athletic  Officer;  Det.  May  22/19. 
Marshall,  Emory  M.  (Ord.)— Jd".  Dec.  23/18;  7;  Assistant  to  Ordnance  Officer. 


370  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

DIVISION  HEADQUARTERS— Con?in«e(i 

Second  Lieutenants: — Continned 

Payson,  A.  H.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd-  May  6/19;  7;  Assistant  to  Quartermaster. 

Piircell,  T.  H.  (Q.M.C.)— Att.  Julie  12/18;  I,  2;  Motor  Transport  Officer;  Det.  Svpi.  1/18. 

Satld,  L.  E.  (C.W.S.)— Att.  Nov.  13/18;  7;  Assistant  Gas  Officer;  Det.  Dec.  8/18. 

Stevenson,  Kenyon  (F.A.) — Att.  March  10/19;  7;  Division  Historical  Officer. 

■White,  John  E.  (Inf.)— Att.  Oct.  9/18;  4,  5;  Liaison  Officer;  Det.  Nov.  30/18. 

Zininicrnian,  Oliver  H.  (Inf.) — Jd.  Oct.  i/lS;  i.  5,  7;  Assistant  Personnel  Adjutant. 

FKENCH  OFFICERS  ATTACHED  TO  DIVISION  HEADQUARTERS 

Major  J.  La  Maroi.s— Att.  June  1/18;  Det.  Nov.  25/18. 

Capt.  Al)el  Silvant— Att.  June  1/18;  Det.  Nov.  21/18. 

Capt.  Arniand  Sonolet— Att.  June  1/18;  Det.  Nov.  21/18. 

Lieut.  Eugene  L.  Bault— Att.  Aug.  15/18;  Det.  Oct.  11/18. 

Lieut.  Maurice  Boda.s— Att.  Aug.  1/18;  Det.  Oct.  11/18. 

First  Lieut.   Raoul  Miguet— Att.  July  1/18;  Det.  Dee.  30/18. 

First  Lieut.  Fcrnand  Reich— Att.  Aug.  1/18;  Det.  March  31/19. 

Fir.st  Lieut.   L.  Ta.ssart— Att.  June  1/18;  Det.  Nov.  3/18. 

Second  Lieut.  Joseph  Aulneau— Att.  Dee.  30/18;  Det.  March  21/19. 

Second  Lieut.   y\lfred  Jacquin— Att.  June  1/18;  Det.  Oct,  11/18. 


HEADQUARTERS  TROOP 

Captains: 

Jones,  Robert  O.— Jd.  May  7/19;  7. 

Luers,  Carl  U.— Jd.  July  17/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  7/19. 

Newton,  Lovejoy— .\tt.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Det.  July  7/18. 

Polk,  Harding— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  June  l(i/18. 

Thomasson,  Eugene  M.— Jd.  July  2/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  17/18. 

First  Ijeuten.hnts: 

Allen,  Chester— Att.  Nov.  28/18;  7;  Det.  Jan.  18,19. 
Burley,  John— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  17/19. 
Taylor,  S.  O.— Att.  April  22/19;  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Erwin,  John  M.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Johnson,  Samuel  B.— Att.  July  13/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Det.  May  1/19. 

Sturgis,  Roger — Att.  March  9/19;  7. 


NINTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE  HEADQUARTERS 

Brigadier  Generals: 

Blanding,  Alliert  H.— Att,  July  7/18  for  instruction;  Det.  Aug.  29/18. 
Castner,  Joseph  C. — Jd.  May  10/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Commanding  Brigade. 

Coi.oNEi, : 

Settle,  Douglas  G. — Jd.  in  L'.  S.;  Temporarily  commanding  Brigade;  Reld.  May  10/18. 

Lieutenant  Colonel: 

Beck,  Robert  McC,  Jr.— Jd,  May  31/18;  1;  Brigade  Adjutant;  Trfd,  July  6/18. 

Majors: 

Chalfant,  Ray  K.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  Ah.  May  15/18  to  Sept.  12/18;  4.  5,  7;  Brigade  Adjutant. 
McCook,  Philip  J.— Jd.   in   U.   S.;   Ab.  June   10   18   to   Oct.  29/18;   5;   Brigade   Adjutant; 

WIA   Nov.  6/18. 
Rivet,  James  D.— Jd.  July  7/18;  2,  3;  Brigade  Adjut.iiil ;  Trfd.  Sept.  19/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  tcith  the  Fifth  Division  371 

NINTH  INFANTRY  BRIGADE  HEADQUARTERS— CVHimweti 

First  Lieutenants: 

Bowman,  Linus  W. — Att.  July  22/18;  2;  Liaison  Agent;  Dei.  Aug.  22/18. 

Carrier,  Ena  C.-^d.  July  15/18;  2,  3,  4.,  5,  7;  Liafson  Agent  and  Operations  Officer;  Trfd. 

May  7/19. 
Chamberlain,  Walter  R. — Att.  July  15/18;  2;  Liaison  Agent;  Det.  Aug.  13/18. 
Cooper,  Harry  P. — Att.  July  7/18;  2;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Brigadier  General  Blanding;  Det. 

Aug.  10/18. 
Cartner,  A.  A.  (M.C.)— Jd.  May  23/18;  1;  Medical  Specialist;  Trfd.  June  25/18. 
Hanson,  Iver  M. — Att.  July  21/18;  2;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Brigadier  General  Blanding;  Det. 

Aug.  29/18. 
Howe,  Ivan  G.  (V.C.)— Jd.  July  11/18;  2,  3,  4.,  5,  7;  Brigade  Veterinarian. 
Peacock,  Roland  H.-^d.  June  30/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Brigadier  General 

Castner. 
Pililgard,  Eric  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Liaison  Officer;  Trfd.  June  27/18. 
Roberts,  Lawrence  B.— Jd.  Sept.  1/18;  3,  4,  5,  7;  Liaison  Agent;  Trfd.  May  12/19. 
Sinclair,  Jolin  B. — Att.  July  7/18;  2;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Brigadier  General  Blanding;  Det. 

Aug.  29/18. 
Smith,  Frank  M.— Jd.  June  10/18;  1,  2,  3,  i;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Brigadier  General  Castner; 

WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Sullivan,  Arthur  W. — Jd.  July  4/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Liaison  Officer  and  Detachment   Com- 
mander; WIA  Nov.  6/18;  Not  evae. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Baldwin,  C.  F.— Jd.  June  13/18;   1;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Brigadier  General  Castner;   Trfd. 

June  27/18. 
HoUister,  George  M. — Att.  July  15/18;  2;  Liaison  .Agent;  Det.  Aug.  22/18. 
Ives,  Irving  M. — Att.  July  15/18;  2;  Liaison  Agent;  Det.  Aug.  13/18. 
Kranziger,  Martin  W.  (V.C.) — .Id.  Jan.  19/19;  Veterinarian. 

Lemons,  Wendell  U.   (V.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Brigade  Veterinarian;  Trfd.  July  7/18. 
Scott,  Harold  W.  (F..!.)— Att.  Dec.  30/18;  7;  Munitions  Inspector;  Det.  May  13/19. 
Slyh,  Donald  M.— Att.  July  10/18;  2;  Liaison  Agent;  Det.  Aug.  22/18. 

FRENCH   OFFICERS   ATTACHED   TO   NINTH   BRIGADE   HEADQUARTERS 

Capt.  Jean  Lalubi«^-Att.  in  U.  S.;  Det.  May  17/18. 

First  Lieut.  Leopold  Berne — Att.  May  17/18;  Det.  May  19/18. 

First  Lieut.  Fernand  A.  Reich — Att.  in  U.  S.;  March  21/19. 


SIXTIETH  INFANTRY 

Colonels: 

Hawkins,  Frank  B.-^d.  Aug.  23/18;  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Oct.  12/18;  Not  evac. 
Settle,  Douglas  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  29/18. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Boiler,  Vernon  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 
ConnoUy,  Patrick  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  29/18. 
Johnson,  Bertram  P.— Jd.  June  3/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  17/18. 
Leonard,  John  W.— Jd.  Nov.  21/18;  7;  DSC. 
Peyton,  Phillip  B.— Jd.  Aug.  31/18;  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  19/18;  DSM. 

Majobs: 

AUworth,  Edward  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.  5,  7;  Medal  of  Honor. 

Baldwin,  Geoffrey  P.— Jd.  Aug.  25/18;  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  19/18. 

Barker,  Frederick  A.— Jd.  Oct.  26/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  17/18. 

Baxter,  Stephen  H.  (M.C.)— Jd.  July  8/18;  2,  3,  4,  5.  7;  Trfd.  March  7/19. 

Druillard,  James  P.— Jd.  Nov.  16/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  8/19. 

Davis,  Lee  D.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Nov.  1/18. 

Haywood,  John  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Nov.  18/18. 


372  Histor/j  of  the  FifiJi  Division 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY— ( ■,inlinuid 

Ma.ioks; — Continued 

Howitt,  George  R.— Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  19/19. 
Loreh,  Roliert  15.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1.5/18. 
Moreliouse,  William  E.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .'\ug.  28/18. 
Norris.  Benjuniiii   (M.C.)— Jd.  June  22/18;  1,  2,  3,  +,  7. 
Palen,  Mathcw  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  3/18. 
Watson,  James  A.— Jd.  April  3/19;  7. 
Whitener,  William  C.-Jd.  Dec.  3/18;  7. 
Williams,  II.  L.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  June  22/18. 

Captains: 

Alway,  Curtis  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,2,  3,  7;  WI A  ,Iuly  20/18;  Not  evae.  WIA   Sept.   lG/18; 

Ret.  Jan.  11/19. 
Amis,  Lewis  W.,  Jr.— Jd.  April  5/19;  7. 
Bate,  Henry  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7. 
Bertram,  Edward  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  June  26/18. 
Brady,  Dalton  E.— xTd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  6,  7;  DSC. 
Bond,  Tliomas  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  23/18. 
Burlv,  Aubrey  H.   (D.C.)— ,ld.  Pel).  28   19;  7. 
Clarli,  Harold  E.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  l,  5,  7. 
DeWolf,  Charles  A.  (D.C.)— Jd.  Fel).  13/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  5/19. 
Dose,  Fredericli  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  l,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  17/18. 
Eads,  Lee  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  DW  reed.  Sept.  l(i/18;  DSC. 
Paris,  William  E.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  27/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  U/19. 
Garri.son,  Albert  C— Jd.  Feb.  IVlfl;  T;  Trfd.  Mardi  21/19. 
Grissom,  Calton  E.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  20/17;  5,  7. 
HaUigan,  Paul  R.— Jd.  Nov.  28/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 
Havden.  Chauncey  H.,  Jr.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  7. 
Hess,  Franii  H.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  6,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  3/19. 
Horridge,  Percy  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  +,  5,  7. 
Howe.  Dan  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4;  WIA   Oct.  14/18. 
Hyde,  Frederick  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  22/18. 
Jones.  Charles  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  12/18. 
John.son,  Lester  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 
Kidd,  Alexander  R.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  8/18. 
King,  Andre  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Kleifgen,  William— Jd.  Fel>.  21/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  18   19. 
Lydon,  John  J.— Jd.  Feb.  22/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  20/19. 
McClure,  James  N.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  12/18. 
McDonald,  Lewis  C— Jd.  Feb.  10/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  2/19. 

McKav,  Rol)ert  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WL\  Sept.  1(>/18;  Ret.  Dec.  2/18. 
Mayers,  Hayden  P.— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  KIA  July  30/18. 
Mercer,  Ray  (M.C.)— .Id.  Oct.  26/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  12/18. 

Michaux,  Edward  R.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.  7;  WIA  Oct.  12/18;  Ret.  Nov.  18/18. 
Mowers,  Joshua   P.— .Id.  in  U.   S.;   1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Newland,  David  L,— ,Td.  Nov.  7/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  3/19. 
NichoUs,  William  M.— ,Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  20   19. 
Phillip,s,  Duff  G.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4,  5,  7. 
Post.  Edwin  P.- Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Pritchard,   Horace  B.    (M.C.)— Jd.   May  13/19;  7. 
Rasch,  Edward  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  20  19. 
Roe.  Fred  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Schmitt,  Frederick  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3.  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  30  19. 
Schuck,  Henley— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  12/18. 
Simonson.  Sigurd  J.— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 
Simpson.  Richard  T.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7. 
Tune,  Horace  R.— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  5,  7;  DSC. 
Ventress,  George  E.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 
Warficld,  John  B.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3.  5;  KIA  Nov.  4/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  ■with  the  Fifth  Division  373 

SIXTI  ETII  ISFASTliY—Cinllnued 

Captains: — Continued 

Wells,  James   H.    (M.C.)— Jd.  June   IVl**;    1;   Trfil.  June   2V18. 
Wells,  Ward  S.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  4/19- 
Weatherfoid,  Mark  V.—Jd.  Feb.   14/19;  7;  Trfd.   Feb.  21/19. 
Westbrook,  William  P.— Jd.  Oct.  2ti/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  15/18. 
Wilson,  Harry— Jd.  Nov.  1/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Wilson,  York  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  GIA  Oct.  31/18. 
Woodliil,  Samuel — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  3,  4,  7;  Medal  of  Honor. 

First  LrenTEX-iNTs: 

Abraham,  Paul  J. — Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7. 

Ash,  Roy  F.— Jd.  Feb.  12/19;  7. 

Anderson,  Frank  P.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Nov.  26/18;  7. 

Anderson,  Sigurt— Jd.  Oct.  26/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Bass,  Jack  M.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Beali,  Egbert,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7. 

Hell,  Harry  L.— Jd.  Feb.  5/19;  7;  Tfrd.  May  9/19. 

Bost,  James  11.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  17/19;  7. 

Boyd,  Adrian  H.-^Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  29,  19. 

Bromberger,  Edgar— Jd.  July  20/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Burns,  William  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Burwasli,  Clarence  P.— Jd.  Feb.  15/19;  7. 

Bush,  Walter  L.— Jd.  Sept.  4/18;  3,  4;  WI.V  Oct.  14/18. 

Cannon,  Louis  B. — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Carrier,  Ena  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  3/18. 

Chamberlain,  Walter— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  19/18. 

Cook,  Charles  R.— Jd.  Nov.  18/18;  7. 

Cox,  Burns  C— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  6,  7. 

Cox,  Thomas  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  12/18. 

Crane,  Leroy  F.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.  31/18. 

Crone,  John  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Daggett,  Wallace  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Evac.  sk.  June  20/18. 

Davis,  Edward  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Sept.  2/18. 

Dawson,  Ralph  E.  (M.C.)— Jd.  June  13/18;  1;  Trfd.  June  24/18. 

Dierking,  Irwin  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Ducket,  John  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Ehrle,  Frederick  C.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  24/18. 

Enochs,  Rex  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Eypper,  Charles  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  I,  2,  3;  WIA  Sei)t.  16/18. 

Finn,  John  J.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Aug.  9/18;  2;  Trfd.  .Vug.  29/18. 

Fisher,  Ray  G.— Jd.  Nov.  16/18;  7. 

Fisher,  Roland  M.— Jd.  Oct.  16/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Fletcher,  George  B.  (M.C.)— Jd.  June  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7 ;  Trfd.  Feb.  15/19. 

Forney,  Moss  H.— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7. 

Fowler,  Talbot  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Gardner,  Glenn  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5;  GI.\  Sept.   16/18;   Ret.  Oct.   18/18;  Trfd. 

Nov.  17/18. 
Gowler,  Samuel  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  DW  reed.  Oct.  12/18. 
Groves,  .\rtliur— Jd.  In  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  12/18. 
Hagan,  Willis  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  5,  7. 
Hamilton,  Raymond  C— Jd.  in  I'.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Hamlin,  Talbott  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Harris,  William  L.— Jd.  Nov.  18/18;  7. 

Harwood,  .Morton  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Havens,  Herbert  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  DS.  Div.  Hq.  Aug.  27/18. 
Hawkins,  Scull  R.— Jd.  Nov.   18/18;  7. 
Hcdden,  Willis  A.— Jd.  Nov.  16/18;  7. 
Henderson,  Frank  W.  — Jd.  Nov.  18/18;  7. 
Hoyt,  Earl  E.^d.  Nov.  7/18;  6,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 


374  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTIETH  I'SFXtiTliY— Continued 

First  Lieutenants: — Continued 

Hughes,  John  G.— Jd.  Feb.  14/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  10/19. 

Isenman,  Frederick  V.-^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Jones,  Richard  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  T;  GIA  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Nov.  l(i/18. 

Kadlec,  Thomas  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  5;  KIA  Oct.  28/18. 

Kane,  William  V.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  15/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  2/19. 

Kernan,  Francis  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  5/18. 

Klein,  John  W.,  Jr.-^d.  Oct.  2G/18;  5;  KIA  Nov.  6/18. 

Long,  Lawrence  U.-^d.  Nov.  18/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  1/19. 

McAllister,  Martin  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S;.  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

McCallen,  Kay  R.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Mclntyre,  Charles  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Mackey,  George  W.— Jd.  Feb.  5/19;  7. 

Martell,  Judson  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18;  DSC. 

Meehan,  Ward  G.  (Chaplain)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  15/18. 

Merrick,  Frank  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  28/18. 

Mewhirter,  David  C.^Jd.  Feb.  5/19;  7. 

Meyer,  Julian  A.  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  DS  Div.  Ilq.  July  26/18. 

Miller,  Richard  A.— Jd.  Nov.  26/18;  7. 

Montgomery,  Carl— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Morris,  Langdon  E.— Jd.  May  23/18;  1;  Trfd.  June  19/18. 

Morrison,  Otlio  K.— Jd.  July  2.3/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Mottern,  Layton  R.— Jd.  Dec.  17/18;  7. 

Munn,  Charles  E.— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  Evac.  sk.  Feb.  9/19. 

Nattier,  Albert  A.— Jd.  July  13/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Nowels,  William  J.— Jd.  Nov.  16/18;  7. 

Parker,  John  J.— Jd.  Dec.  31/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  7/;9. 

Pearsall,  Charles  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  2/18. 

Polack,  Rodney  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Powell,  Walter  F.— Jd.  Feb.  14/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Priest,  Harold  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd,  Aug.  7/18. 

Radford,  Paul  C— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7. 

Reddy.  William  J.  (M.C.)— Jd.  June  13/18;  1;  Trfd,  July  9/18. 

Reed,  Washington— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  25/18;  DSC. 

Reeve,  Arthur  J.— Jd.  July  26/18;  2.  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Kidgley,  Montgomery  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Sept.  2/18, 

Schneringcr,  Herman — Jd.  Nov.  16/18;  7. 

Schorn,  Louis  M.  (Chaplain) — Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  7. 

Schwartz,  Seymour  G.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept,  30/18. 

Scott,  David  E.  (Chaplain)— ,ld.  Aug.  14/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  5/19. 

Sliannon,  Gerald  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  25/18. 

Shellenbergcr,  Charles  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Slick,  Glen  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Slyh,  Donald  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  12/18. 

Steiliel,  L.  R.  (M.C.)— .Td.  Oct.  31/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  14/18. 

Stephens,  Frank  O.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Oct.  31/18;  Ret.  Dec.  19/18. 

Stephenson,  Hugh  H.— Jd.  Nov.  1/18;  5,  7. 

Straut,  Eustace  P.— Jd,  Jan,  20/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  15/19. 

Thie.s,  Edward  M.   (M.C.)— Jd.  March  1/19;  7. 

Thornburg,  Robert  S.— Jd.  Aug.  28/18;  3;  GIA   Sept.  25/18. 

Thune,  Lewis  M.— Jd.  Aug.  27/18;  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  11/18, 

Underbill,  Oliver  C— Jd.  Feb.  5/19;  7. 

Utterback,  Robert  E.— .Td.  Feb.  5/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  24/19. 

Volk,  Maxwell  L.  (M.C.)— Jd.  March  1/19;  7. 

Vosseler,  Edward  A.-^Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7. 

Weber,  Anton— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

Webster,  Henry  I-.— Jd.  Feb.  5/19;  7. 

Welton,  Richard  F.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  IT.  S.;  I,  2,  3,  4,  7. 

We.ston.  Walter  A.— Jd.  May  20/18;   1;  Trfd.  July  8/18. 


Officers  WJio  Served  'with  the  Fifth  Division  375 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY— C'on(in»e(Z 

First  Lieutenaxts: — Continued 

Whisenant,  John  R.  (M.C.)— Jd-  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  24/18. 

AVhite,  Clarence  L.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  4;  Died  Oct.  20/18. 

Wilfong,  C.  T.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  2U/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  27/18. 

Woehr,  Charles  D.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7. 

Wolf,  Peter  T.— Jd.  July  23/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Young,  Harold— Jd.  Nov.  1/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Zimmerman,  Harrison  J. — Jd.  Nov.  18/18;  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Adamson,  Glenn  S.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  GIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Akers,  James  W.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  KI.V  Oct.  14/18. 

Alexander,  Joseph  E. — Jd.  Nov.  15/19;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28  19. 

Allen,  WiUiam  A.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Evac.  sk.  Sept.  23/18. 

Apper,  Morris  J.— Jd.  July  23/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Baker,  Evan  A.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Trfd.  March  23   19. 

Banks,  John  F.^Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Barnett,   Lowell— Jd.   Nov.   14/18;  7. 

Baruth,  Barnard  K.— ,Jd.  Nov.  1.5/18;  7;  Trfd.  Nov.  28/18. 

Bashore,  Wilbur  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Birch,  George  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  GIA  Oct.  18/18;  Not  evac;  Trfd.  Feb.  1/19. 

Blessing,  Robert  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Bose,  WilUam  C— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Nov.  28/18. 

Brandt,  John  T.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Butterfield,  George  D.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WI.\  Oct.  12/18. 

Cappoch,  Edgar  L.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  1,  19. 

Christensen,  Neils— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

Clarkson,  Herbert— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Clementz,  Walter  L.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Coffey,  Richard  H.— .Id.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Cole,  Okey  K.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WL\  Oct.  14/18. 

Conway,  J.  E.— Jd.  Oct.  26/18;  5;  Evac.  sk.  Nov.  (i/18. 

Courtney,  Jesse  L.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  DS  Div.  Hq.  .March  20/19. 

Cox,  Edward  O.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

Craumer,  Albert  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.   14/18. 

Crocheron,  Hal  H.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5;  GL\  Nov.  3/18. 

Damsgaard,  Arthur  C. — Jd.  Nov.  1.5/18;  7. 

Davis,  Clarence  O.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  6,  7. 

Drunimond,  William  C— Jd.  Oct,  4/18;  4,  7;  GIA  Oct.  12/18;  Ret.  Jan.  19/19. 

Eigenauer,  John  E.— Jd.  Nov.  2/18;  5,  7;  Evac.  sk.  Dec.  14/18. 

Epper.son,  Garrick— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WL\  Oct.  14/18. 

Estep,  Willie  S.-^d.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Faison,  Preston— Jd.  May  20/18;  1.  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  1(>/18;  Ret.  Dec.  21/18. 

Fischer,  William  B.— Jd."  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  25/19. 

Fritsche,  William— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Gerlach,  Frank  W.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  DS  Div.  Hq.  April  13/19. 

Gilleland,  .\rthur— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Good.  Newton  E.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  WI.V  Nov.  G/18. 

Hagan,  Frank  E.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Oct.  29/18;  Ret.  April  17/19. 

Hill,  William  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  7. 

Hochstein,  David— Jd.  Oct.  9/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  12/18. 

Holran,  Francis  R.  D.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Hope,  Eugene  F.— Jd.  Nov.  .5/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  24/19. 

Hubbard,  Clifford  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WL\  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  April  12/19. 

Jackson,  Harold  L.— ,Id.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  8/19. 

Jones,  William  H.— ,Td.  Nov.  16/18;  7. 

Kelly,  Forrest  H.-Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

KIopp,  George  A.-^d.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

KornafeU,  Charles  F.— Jd.  Oct.  6/18;  4;  GIA  Oct.  1.3/18. 


376  History  of  tlic  Fiftli  Division 

SIXTIETH   INKANTHY^CyH/iHKcri 

Second   Lieite^axts: — Cuntiniied 

Lanyon,  William  J.—Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

Leader,  Edward  li.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  Evao.  sli.  Nov.  21/18. 

I,elmian,  William  F.— Jd.  Jan.  20/l<);  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Lively,  Carlos  J.—Jd.  July  2()/18;  2,  3,  i;   WIA  and  GLA   Sept.  25/18;   Uet.   Oet.  5/18; 

WL\  Oet.  15/18. 
McComij,  Karl  S.— Jd.  May  23/18;  1,  2;  KIA  Aug.  12/18. 
Mclntyre,  Turney  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
MeLean,  Claud  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  22/18. 
Malone,  John  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  ConuuLssioned  Nov.  3/18. 
Mellan,  George  Z.— Jd.  May  23/18;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  Iti/18. 
Merliin,  Fred.— Jd.  July  28/18;  2;  Trfd.  x\ug.  18/18. 
Miller,  Harry  H.— Jd."Nov.  lG/18;  7;  Trfd.   May  11/19. 
Minnis,  Aristide— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Moeller,  Edward  H.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 
Muenig,  Joseph  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Montgomery,  Rodney  E.— Jd.  Nov.   15/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  8/19. 
Moon,  Charles  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Moon,  Glenn  W.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

Morgan,  Kiley  E.^ld.  May  21/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.  18/18. 
Mount,  William  R.— Jd.  Oet.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 
Murphy,  Leo  B.— Jd.  May  20/18;  Trfd.  July  19/18. 
Nieliolson.  Somerville— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 
Norton,  Perry  L.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  7;  GIA  Oet.  13/18;  Ret.  Nov.  13/18. 
Parklmrst,  Henry  W.— Jd.  July  28/18;  2,  3,  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 
Peeples,  Harry— J d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  22/18. 
Pennington,  Lee  R.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Pfost,  Alfred  E.— Jd.  Nov.  16/18;  7. 
Phillips,  Robert  B.— Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4;  WIA  Oet.  14/18. 
Pillion,  Lester  H.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Evac.  sk.  Dee.  5/18. 
Pratt,  James— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WL\  Oct.  14/18. 

Rahn,  Earl  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4;  WL\  Oet.  14/18;  DW  Oct.  18/18. 
Ranch,  Harry  A.— Jd.  Oct.  2(i/18;  5,  7. 

Kicliardson,  James  N.— Jd.  July  2fi'18;  2,  4;  DW  reed.  Oct.  14/18. 
Rohinson,  Newton,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  13/18. 
Seliilf,  Herman  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  25/18. 
Sclilcgel,  F.  E.— Jd.  June  15/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Sevvell,  James  H.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  7;  GLV  Oct.  12/18;  Ret.  Nov.  17/18. 
Slumd,  Robert  G.— Jd.  May  15/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  12,  18;  Died  pneumonia. 
Shapiro,  Nathan— Jd.  July  12/18;  2;  Trfd.  July  29/18. 

Slierman,  Earl  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  l(j   IS;  Ret.  Nov.  14/18. 
Smart,  Edward  C— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  GLA  Oct.  14/18. 
-    Smith,  Frank  W.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  Evac.  sk.  Oet.  8/18. 
Soutli,  Leon  C— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

Stair,  Harry  H.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 
Sullivan,  Arthur  W,— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  June  27   18. 
Swiggum,  Thomas  D. — Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 
Taylor,  Frank  J.—Jd.  Nov.   15   18;  7. 
Taylor,  Slieridan— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 
Thrailkill,  David   W.— Jd.  Nov.   13/18;   7. 
Tolk,  Jacob  B.— Jd.  Jan.  9/19;  7. 

Traccy.  Harold  H.— Jd.  June  22/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 
Volleiitine,  Slater  H. — Td.  Oct.  4   18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Walker,  Willie  A  — Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7. 
Weine,  Richard— Jd.  Oet.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  12/18. 
West,  William  B.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5;  GLV  Nov.  5/18. 
White,  Frank  O.  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WL\  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Oet.  30/18;  Trfd. 

Jan.  28/19. 
Williams.  Donald  H.— Jd.  in  IF.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division  377 

SIXTIETH  INFANTRY— C'oHiiKucf/ 

Second   Likctkxanu's: — Continued 

Williams,  Garner  B. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  14/18. 
Williams,  Raymond  J. — Jd.  Jan.  4/19;  7. 
Yaeger,  Norbert  F.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  GIA  Oct.  13/18. 
Yeager,   Rubert  E.— Jd.  July  2B/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.   18/18. 
Y'oung,  Edward  J.^Jd.  Nov.  5/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

FRENCH  OFFICERS  ATTACHED 

Capt.  Jean  l.alubie— .\tt.   May  19/19;  Det.  Sept.  26/18. 

Second  Lieutenant  Jacques  Barailler— .\tt.  .May  19/18;  Det.  Sejit.  8/18. 

Second  Lieutenant  Pierre  ^'almont— Att.  May  19/18;  Det.  Sept.  3/18. 


SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY 

Colonels: 

McClure,  I.owe  A.— .Id.  Aug.  1/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Peyton,  Philip  B.— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  5.  7;  Commanding  regiment;  DSM. 

Wise,  Hugh  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  19/18. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Blythe,  James— Jd.  March  25/19;  7. 

Page,  John  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  27/19. 

Majors: 

Bankhead,  Charles  C.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  1/18. 

Blanks,  Henry  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Burleigh,  John  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  20/18. 

Cook,  Giles  B.  (M.C.)— Jd.  May  2/19;  7. 

Davis,  Paul  Y.— Jd.  Nov.  18/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  12/19. 

Hartigan,  Walter  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

Henley,  Donald  C— Jd.  Aug.  9/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  3/19. 

Longwell,  Benjamin  J.   (M.C,)— Jd.  Oct.  6/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April   18/19. 

Martin,  Chester  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 

Munson,  Calois  L.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  14/18. 

Pruitt,  Marion  C.   (M.C.)— Jd.  March  1/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  2/19. 

Rivet,  James  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  4;  KIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Stark,  Alexander  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Captains: 

Brooks,  Joseph  L.— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Brown,  Lloyd  D.^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  7. 

Brown,  Solomon  K. — Jd.  in  U.  S.;  I;  DS  Div.  H<|.  June  24   18. 

Carden,  John  J.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3,  4,  5,  7;  WI.V  Oct.  12   18;  Ret.  Nov.  6/18. 

Clark,  Ora  E.— Jd.  in  LI.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Sept.  3  18. 

Cole,  James  E— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Demuth,  William  F.  (M.C.)^d.  Aug.  1/18;  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  28/19. 

Ehlert,  John  H.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  12/18. 

Fisher,  Russell  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Glasgow,  Lawrence  B.— Jd.  May  28/18;   1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WI.\   Oct.   12/18;  Ret.  Nov.  27/18; 

DS  Div.  Hq.  Jan.  2/19. 
Golding,  Harold  H.   (M.C.)— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Hodge,  ,Tohn  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Horton,  William  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  27/18. 
Howlett,  Howard  H.  (M.C.)— ,Td.  May  17/19;  7. 

Hudson.  Thomas  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Janowitz,  Alfred  A.  (M.C.)-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 


378  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTY-FIRST  ItiYAniKY— Continued 

Captains: — Continued 

Jones,  Robert  O.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  2/19. 

Kvle,  George— J(i.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Longley,  Chester  H.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  21/18;  5,  7. 

McDonald,  Lewis  C— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Mendenliall,  James  E.— Jd.  May  18/19;  7. 

Moose,  Frank  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Mullins,  Walter  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 

Ualvsmitli,  Vincent— Jd.  May  28/19;  7. 

O'Donoghue,  William— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  7. 

Olinstead,  Merritt  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  l,  5,  7. 

Payne.  Howard  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  Div.  Hq.  June  6/18. 

Piiikston,  William  E.^d.  May  18/19;  7. 

Kock,  Lewis  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 

Hiissell,  Paul  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  26/18. 

Schmidt,  Feodor  O.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  16/18;  Ret.  Feb,  2/19. 

Scliwartz,  Tasso  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Scott,  Fred  F.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  24/18. 

Shands,  Joseph  W.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  20/18. 

Smith,  Frank  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  7. 

Sullivan.  John  J.— Jd.  May  7/18;  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  3/19. 

Taber,  William  A.— Jd.  May  30/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Westbrook,  Ronde  A.— Jd.  May  6/19;  7. 

WiUiams,  Roger,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

FiBST  Lieutenants: 

Adams,  Claud— Jd.  Feb.  9/19;  7. 

Alexander,  John— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  23/18. 

Angus,  Gaylord  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  28/19. 

Baird,  Robert  A.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  17/19. 

Baldwin.  Charles  F.— Jd.  May  22/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  5/19. 

Barth,  Frank  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  I,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Benewitz,  Anthony  H.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  10/18. 

Beven,  Chester  A.— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  28/19. 

Birks,  Hammond  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Evac.  sk.  Nov.  1/18. 

Borg,  John  G.— Jd.  Nov.  21/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  29/18. 

Boyd,  Willis  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  16/18;  Ret.  Dec.  23/18. 

Brown,  Coleman  T.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  18/18. 

Brown,  Killnirn  R.-,Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  12/18. 

Brux,  Cecil  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5;  KIA  Nov.  2/18. 

Bush,  Arthur  C.  (M.C.)— Jd.  May  13/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  20/19. 

Bvers,  Isaac— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Cardwell,  James  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Cobb,  Herbert  G.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  12/18. 

Cooper,  Charles  P.— Jd.  May  20/19;  7. 

Corbey,  Robert— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  DW  reed.  Nov.  6/18. 

Cox,  Leonard— ,Td.  May  6/19;  7. 

Crawford,  Harry— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.   18/19. 

Deaver,  John  A.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Aug.  12/18;  2,  3,  4;  KL\  Oct.  12/18. 

Dillard.  Miles  H.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Dry,  George  H.— .Td.  May  20/19;  7. 

Durvee,  Winsor  G.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  26/18. 

Dysart,  John  O.— ,Jd.  May  18/19;  7. 

Erff,  George— Jd.  May  11/19;  7. 

Everett,  Charles  J.— .Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Exley,  R.  J.   (M.C.)— Jd.  July  18/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19, 

Finnegan,  Edwin  J.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Dec.  30/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  5/19. 

First,  Moses  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  30/18. 

Fisher,  Charles  J.— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  12/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  loith  the  Fifth  Division  379 

SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY— Continued 

First  Lieutenants : — Continued 

Fleck,  Carl  W.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Fletcher,  Willard— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Floyd,  Harry— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Foltz,  Frank  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Fredericks,  Eugene  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  23/18. 

Garland,  Herbert  C— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  28/19. 

Gebert,  Charles  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  +;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  26/18. 

Geisey,  Samuel  H.— Jd.  May  6/19;  7. 

Greening,  Earl  H.-^d.  Nov.  3/18;  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  19/18. 

Groves,  Jasper  M.— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Gunne,  L.  Hamilton— Jd.  Feb.  17/19;  7. 

Hanson,  Merwvn  H.— Jd.  Feb.  8   19;  7;  Trfd,  April  29/19. 

Harris,  Arthur  C.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Nov.  U/18;  7;  Trfd.  Nov.  28/18. 

Hawes,  Charles  C— Jd.  May  19/19;  7. 

High,  Roney  M.— Jd.  May  18/19;  7. 

Hills,  I.yma'n  W.-^Td.  Feb.  8/19;  7. 

Hite,  Fontaine  H.  (M.C.)-^Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  3/18. 

HoUeman,  Audley  G.-^d.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  18/19. 

Honeycutt,  Octavius  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.  29/18. 

Howard,  Bailey  C— Jd.  Jan.  18/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  29/18. 

Howarth,  Jacob  M.— Jd.   Feb.  8/19;  7. 

Howe,  Ivan  G.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  11/18. 

Huggins,  Paul  C— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 

Ives,  Irving  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  .5,  7. 

James,  Efton  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Jones,  Henry  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7. 

Kane,  William  V.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GI.\  Oct.  12/18, 

Keasler,  Thomas  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  30/18. 

Kelley,  Edward  W.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WI.\  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Nov.  12/18. 

Koziatek.  Theodore— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  24/19. 

Kramer,  Herman  G. — Jd.  May  11/19;  7. 

Krauss.  Frank  B.— ,Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Lane,  Frank— Jd.  in  U.  S, ;  1,  2.  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd,  .\pril  26/19. 

Lanning,  Elmer  H.— Jd.  Mav  19/19;  7. 

Lax,  Barkley  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  23/18. 

Leiby.  George  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.  18/18. 

Long,  James  E.— ,Td.  May  18/19;  7. 

Lottridge,  Charles  L.— Jd.  May  5/19;  7. 

Loughlin,  Carl  C— Jd.  May  19/19;  7. 

Luers,  Carl  U.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2;  Trfd,  Julv  17/18. 

McDonald.  Paul  H.  (M.C.)— Jd.  May  8/19;' 7. 

Mcintosh,  Angu.s  B.-Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Oct,   14/18;  WI.'V   Oct,   16/18; 

Ret.  Oct.  27/18. 
Marks,  Willouglibv  R.— Jd,  in  U,  S,;  1,  2,  3.  4;  KIA  Oct,  12/18. 
Marlow,  Stuart  I.!— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1.  2,  3.  4;  KL\  Oct.  14/18. 
Marquis,  Harold  D.— Jd.  Feb.  20/19:  7;  Trfd.  March  28/19. 
Meade,  LaRue  T.— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  18/19. 
Montgomery,  T,  Harlan— Jd.  Feb.  8/19:  7;  Trfd.  .April  18/19. 
Moon,  Cecil'  C— Jd,  Nov.  19/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Moore,  Roger  L. — Jd.  May  7/19;  7. 

Morris.  Frank  D.— Jd.  No'v.  18/18;  7;  Trfd.  March  18/19. 

Mulligan.  John  F.  (Chaplain)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd,  .Vjiril  16/19. 
Mulligan,  John  J.— Jd.  in  LT.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  5,  7. 
Olson,  Harry  I..— Jd.  May  7/19;  7. 
O'Toole,  Dennis  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3.  4,  5;  WIA  Oct.  12/18;  Ret.  Oct.  25/18;  Trfd. 

Nov.  3/18. 
Owen,  William  O,— Jd.  in  U.  S,;  1,  2.  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  21/19. 
Palmer,  Lloyd  B.— Jd.  May  19/19;  7. 


380  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY— Con/iHH.,/ 

FiKST  LiF.iTENAKTs: — Continued 

Parker,  Farrar  B.   (M.C.)— Jd-  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  11/18. 

Patterson,  Ora  E.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  6/19;  7. 

Perry,  Edward— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  28/18. 

Philgard,  Eric  F.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i\  WIA  Oct.   13,18  Ret.  Jan.  29/18;   Died   Feb. 

28/19. 
Poore,  Ralph  D.— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  Fell.  20/19. 
Porch,  James  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  1,  5,  7. 
Porter,  Joseph  R.— Jd.  May  6/19;  7. 
Power,  Herman  G.— Jd.  in  IT.  S.;  1.  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  22/18. 
Reidy.  Michael  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  18/18. 
Rhodcfer,  Lawrence — Td.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5.  7;  Trfd.  ,\pril  18/19. 
Rink,  Robert  N.— Jd.  Feb.  14/19;  7. 
Roberts,  Lawrence  B. — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  7. 

Roberts.  Stanley  H.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Dec.  30/18;  7;  Trfd.  Aiiril  16/19. 
Ros.s,  David  M."  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5.  7. 
Ruff.  Arthur  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3.  4,  .5;  GI.\  Nov.   1    18. 
Schrini.  Charles  A.— Jd.  May  20/19;  7. 

Schweickhart,  Graham  H.^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  17/18. 
Setzer,  George  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Evac.  sk.  Nov.  2/18. 
Shar]ie.  John  D.— Jd.  Feb.  14/19;  7. 

Sherman.  Paul  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3.  .5.  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 
Shoaff.  Walter  P.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Smeallie.  Donald— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WI.\  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Feb.  18  19. 
Smith.  Edwin  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  .5,  7. 
Smith,  Isadore  L.  (Chaplain) — Td.  May  1/19;  7. 
Smith.  James  F.— Jd.   in  U.   S.;   1.  2,  .3,  7. 
Stevenson,  Francis  C— Jd.  Feb.  6/19;  7;  Trfd    March  18/19. 
Stotbart,  Joseph  L.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  .5.  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 
Strohmeyer,  Charles  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Sutherland,  William  E.— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Swindler,  Henry  O.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5;  WIA  Oct.  27/18. 
Thihodeau,  Asa  B.   (Chaplain)— .Td.  May  8/19;  7. 

Tonolla.  Edward  H.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Nov.  2  18;  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.   17/18. 
Tujague,  Edward  G.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28  '18. 
Wallace.  Paul  B.— ,Td.  Oct.  1/18;  4;  WL\  Oct.  14/18. 
West,  James — Td.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  28/19. 
■      White,  Stuart  B.— Jd.  Feb.  10/19;  7. 

Wilson,  John  I.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3.  7;  GIA  Sept.  16/18;  Ret  Nov.  17/18. 

Wilson,  William— Jd.  Feb.  6/19;  7. 

Winters.  Raymond  C— .Ld.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.   Aug.   18/18. 

Wood.  Charles  A.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3.  4;  GIA  Oct.  16/18. 

Wyatt,  Stanley  J.— Jd.  Feb.  6/19;  7. 

Young,  Robert  W. — Td.  Aug.  22/18;  3,  .5;  KLV  Oct,  30/18. 

Second  Lieitekants: 

Alexander.  John— ,Td.  Nov.  9/18;  .5,  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Anderson.  Morgan  M.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Austin,  AVilburn  N.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Baker,  Lemuel  L.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5.  7;  Trfd.  Aiuil  18   19. 

Baker,  Marvel   I..— Jd.   Oct.   7/18;  4.   7;   WIA    Oct.   1.5/18;   Ret.   Nov.   17   18;  Trfd.   April 

18/19. 
Ball.  Louis  M.— Jd.  May  22/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  2.5/18. 

Barnard,  Philip  E. — Td!  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  .3.  5.  7;  WIA  Nov.  7/18;  R<t.  .\pril  6/19. 
Beaton.  Robert  R— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  3/18. 
Heine,  Helmuth— Jd.  Oct.  7/14;  4,  7;  WL\  Oct.   14/18;  Ret.  Nov.  25/18. 
Bergey,  Henrv  W.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .A,ug.  8/18. 

Binfoi-d,  Joseph  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2.  .3.  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Nov.  G;'18. 
Boesch,  Walter  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  23/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division  381 

SIXTY-FIKST  INFANTRY— ConN-HHfrf 

Second   Lieutenants: — Continued 

Bondlid,  Oscar  A.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Booth,  Harry— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  1.5/18. 

Brominell.  Francis  J.  — Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3;  Evac.  sk.  Sept.  18/18. 

Butts,  William  O.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Canirnack,  George — Jd.   Nov.   9/18;  5,  7. 

Cash,  Frank  H.  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  WIA  .\iig.  1/18;  DW  Aug.  2/18. 

Castleherry,  John  R.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  .5,  7. 

Coleman,  Eugene  M.— Jd.  May  22  18;  1,  2,  .3,  1,  .5:  GTA   Nov.  .5/18. 

Considine,  Raymond  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  U/IS. 

Correll,  .Milton  I,.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21/18. 

Grays,  Harold  C— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  GIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Davis,  Lester  M.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  18/19. 

Dennison,  Merrill— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  15/18. 

Douglass,  Drew— ^Td.  Nov.  12/18;  7. 

DuBarrv,  William  H.— Jd.  Mav  19/19;  7. 

Edwards,  William  S.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  23/18. 

Elseaser,  Otto  H.— Jd.  Nov.  23/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Ertwine,  Maxwell  B.— Jd,  Mav  20/19;  7. 

Ewans,  W^alter  R.— Jd.  in  U.  "s.;  1;  Trfd.  July  16/18. 

Finberg,  Elmer  A. — Id.  Mav  22/18 ;.l;  Trfd.  June  30/18. 

Funk.  Hal  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Julv  22/18. 

Gardner,  Lester  E.— Jd.  July  20/18;  2,  3,  4,"  5,  7;  Trfd,  Feb.  17/19. 

Gilman,  Walter  A.— Jd.  Oct".  1/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Gilpatrick,  George  F.— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  4;  GIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Godwin,  Frank  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  20/18;  Ret.  Jan.  23/19. 

Godridge,  John  A.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 

Go.se,  Charles  J.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  S,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 

Graham,  William  E.— Jd.  May  18/19;  7. 

Grant,  Leonard  P.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  ./Vug.  18/18. 

Gulliim,  Walter  .\.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  13/18. 

Gundlach,  All>ert— Jd.  Nov."  9/18;  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Ajiril  1809. 

Hardee,  Furman  W.— Jd.  May  9/19;  7. 

Harris.  Stacev  P.-^Td.  Nov.  9/18;  6,  7;  DS  Div.  Hq.  March  11/19. 

Hays,  John  W.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  WIA  Aug.  10/18. 

Heil,  Elmer  A.-^d.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA   Sept.  l(i/18;  Ret.  Sept.  30/18;   WIA 

Oct,  15/18;  Ret.  Nov.  18/18;  Trfd.  Nov.  25/18. 
Hickey,  Yates— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .Vug,  2fi/18. 
Hinderer,  Frank  C— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 
Hoeft,  Herbert  F.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

HoUister,  George  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  12/18. 
Hunt,  Worley  W.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2.  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  1.3/18. 
Johnson,  Nils  B.— Jd.  May"  20/18;  1.  2.  3.  4;  GL\  Oct.  lfi/18. 
Johnson.  Samuel  B.— Jd.  "in  U.  S.;  DS  Div.  Po.stofTice  June  14/18. 
Kiplinger,  Walter  C— Jd.  Nov.  1/18;  5,  7. 
Knowles.  Gordon  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug,  18/18. 
Kohn,  Philip— Jd.  Feb.  16/19;  7. 
Koff,  Fred  D.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 
Lacy,  Thomas  S.— Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7. 

Lamp,  Frank  F.— Jd.  May  21/19.  - '     ' 

Lee.  Lawrence  W.— Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Lindsay.  Hal^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3.  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  27/18. 
McCormick,  Thomas  E.— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  4;  WIA   Oct.  15/18. 
McGuire,  Claude  B.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 
McKibbon,  Frank  J.-^Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Mains,  William  J.— Jd.  Oct.  6/18;  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Nov,  11/18, 
Malarkey,  Robert  A.— Jd,  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Masterson,  James  M.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  29/18. 
Maupin,  Arnold  J.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 


382  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTY-FIRST  INFANTRY— Continued 

Second   Liettenants; — Continued 

Meister,  Edward— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  2.5/18. 

Minor,  John  B.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  1.5/18. 

Montee,  Jesse— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19;  DSC. 

Moore,  Daniel  J.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  11/19. 

Moorehead,  James  K.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Moyer,  Albert— Jd.  Nov.  19/18;  Trfd.  Nov.  25/18. 

Nelson,  Anton  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  I,  2,  3,  4;  WI.\  Oct.  15/18. 

Nix,  Roi  E.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Nonemacher,  Guy— Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  8/19. 

Parkhill,  Oakley"j.^Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5;  Evac.  sk.  Nov.  27/18;  DSC. 

Peace,  Arthur  W.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  Evac.  sk.  Aug.  29/18. 

Pekor,  Jesse  G.— Jd.  Nov.  il/18;  7. 

Phillips,  Lionel  J.— Jd.  May  19/19;  7. 

Pignian,  Van  Buren — Jd.  May  1()/19;  7. 

Powell,  Ralph  S.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  1.5/19. 

Prosise,  .Man  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WI.V  Oct.  1.5/18. 

Quail,  Jarvis— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  2(i/18. 

Read,  Edward  L.— ,Td.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Nov.  15/18. 

Richard,  Henry  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  GIA  Sept.  16/18;  Ret.  Sept.  22/18;  Trfd. 

Nov.  2/18. 
Saxe,  I-ouis  B.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 
Shupe,  Benson  P.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 
Smith,  Charles  E.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 
Soares,  Frank  J.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Stacks,  Robert  E.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  27/19. 
Stanley,  Fernie  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  8,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  2/18. 
Swann,  Harold  W.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  24/18. 
Travis,  Richard  C— Jd.  March  19/19;  7. 

Trezevant,  Roy  H.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KI.V  Oct.  14/18. 
Vinson,  Wilbu'r  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Wagner,  Charles  .\.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18;  DW  Oct.  26/18. 
AVarnick,  Arthur  G.— Jd.  March  19/19;  7. 
White,  Halfred  H.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 
White,  Paul  D.— Jd.  Nov.  19/18;  7. 
White,  William  R.^Jd.  Nov.  19/18;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Wilson,  Lee  G.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7. 

Wilson,  Thomas  H.^Td.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  7;  WIA  and  GIA  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Dec.  15/18. 
Winter,  James— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Nov.  15/18;  Trfd.  Jan. 

28/19. 
Wood,  Clarence— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4;  DW  reed.  Oct.  14/18. 
Woods,  William  A.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 


FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

Majobs:  , 

Barker,  Frederick  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  10/18. 

Doe,  Jens  A.— Jd.  Aug.  10/18;  2,  .3.  4,  5;  GIA   Oct.   19/18;  Not  evac;  Trfd.  Nov.   11/18. 
Fox,  Tom^Td.  Nov.  11/18;  7. 

Lund,  Frank  J.— Jd.  Dec.  28/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  16/19. 
Mercer,  Ray  (M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  18/18;  4,  7. 

Captains: 

Carr,  Thomas  A.— Jd.  May  9/19;  7. 
Grimes,  William  M.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  1/18. 
Jones,  Robert  O.— Jd.  March  2/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  19/19. 

Kirkbride,  Pennell  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Oct.  17/18;  Not  evac;  Trfd. 
March  21/19. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division  383 

FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION— Conimiied 

Captains: — Continued 

Kirst,  Anthony  J.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7;  GIA  Sept.  16/18;  Ret.  Oct.  21/18;  Trfd. 

Jan.  29/19. 
Kleifgen,  William— Jd.  March  2/19;  7;  Trfd.   May  5/19. 
Laidlaw,  WiUiam— Jd.  May   17/19;  7. 
Lewis,  Charles  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Sept.  3/18. 
McBride,  Robert  D.— Jd.  JIarch  18/19;  7. 

Mershon,  Henry  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Patrick,  Edwin" D.-^Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 
Kaborg,  Paul  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  1/18. 
Schmitt,  Frederick  S.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  9/19. 
Wells,  James  R.  (M.C.)^Jd.  April  24/18;  Trfd.  May  27/18. 
Woodson,  WiUiam  A.— Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7;  Left  Nov.  "l5/18. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Abernathy,  Sherman  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  4/18. 

Ammeron,  Harold  F.^d.  Aug.  19/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  9/19. 

Barend,  Ira  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  6/18. 

Beardsley,  James  E.-^d.  Feb.  20/19;  7. 

Bowman,  Linus  W.^d.  May  21/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.  31/18. 

Chamberlain,  Roy  F.— Jd.  Dec.  31/18;  7;  Trfd.   May  15/19. 

Davern,  John  J.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  May  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Sept.   12/18. 

Denaple,  Edward  S.— Jd.  Aug.  19/18";  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  29/18. 

Fleek,  Glenn  B.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4,  7;  GL\  Oct.  16/18;  Ret.  Nov.  11/18. 

Forgy,  Herman  C— Jd.  March  25/19;  7. 

Huff,"  Walter  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Koob,  George  L.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Nov.  26/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.   13/19. 

KroU,  Peter  J.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  March  9/19;  7. 

Louisell,  William  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  6/18. 

McCoskrie,  Frank  W.— Jd.  Nov.  2/18;  5,  7;  DS  April  14/19. 

MacDaniel,  Roliert  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Matter,  Bryan  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Paine,  Charles  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .'Vug.  20/18. 

Peters,  Homer  P.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  7. 

Pierce,  Jo.seph   E.-^d.   in   V.   S.;   1,  2,  3,   7;   Died   April  24/19. 

Plouffe,  Joseph  L.— Jd.  Nov.  11/18;  7;  Trfd.  Nov.  13/18. 

Prosser,  James  B.  B.— Jd.  Feb.  9/19;  7. 

Kabe,  William  H.— Jd.  Aug.  30/18;  3,  7. 

Renne,  Frank  A.— Jd.  March  24/19;  7;  Trfd.   April   18/19. 

Rowley,  Benjamin  B.  (M.C.)-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  I,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  18/18. 

Sanders,  William  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  28/18. 

Sherman,  WiUiam  W.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  .5,  7. 

Smith,  Newton  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2.  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Taylor,  Roswell  M.— Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Thomas,  James  V.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Oct.  26/18. 

Tidwell,  William  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  2/18. 

Tyler,  Frank  E.— Jd.  May  21/18;  Trfd.  June  12/18. 

YueU,  Donovan— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  9/18. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

CUpp,  Ralph  W.— Jd.  Oct.  .5/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Coppock,  Edgar  L.— Jd.  Feb.  2/19;  7. 

Denison,  Merrell— Jd.  May  15/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .Aug.  15/18. 

Dickenson,  Jonathan  O.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4;  WIA  Oct.  16/18. 

Drugg,  Walter— Jd.  Aug.  27/18;  4,  5;  WIA  Oct.  31/18. 

Eisner,  Morris  M. — Jd.  May  25/19;  7. 

Frostholm,  Jens  H.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1.  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  19/18. 

Gabler,  Jacob  B.— Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7. 


381  Historij  of  the  Fifth  Divisiun 

FOURTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  'HYTT \l .lOS^C.nithuicd 

Skcond   Lieutknants: — Cov tinned 

Graves,  Eric  K.— ,Td.  Nov.  13/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  11/19. 

Green,  Bennie  A.— Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  i,  .5;"  KIA  Oct.  26/18. 

Henson,  Hay  A.— Jd.  May  23/10;  7. 

Jacobs.  Bruce  K.— Jd.  Oct.  .5/18;   !■,  5;  WI.\  Oct.  2()/18. 

Jenkinson,  Lawrence  W. — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1;  Trfd.  July  1.5/18. 

Luhliert.  Gerard  B.— Jd.  Au;;.  28/18;  3:  GI.\   Sept.  16/18. 

May,  Roy  W.— Jd.  Nov.  VIS;  5,  7. 

Mullins.  Bob— Jd.  Aug.  27/18;  3.  t,  .5,  7. 

Neal,  William  H.— Jd.  Feb.  9/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  28/19. 

Nicholas,  Florris— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  21/18. 

Parton,  Adam  W.— Jd.  Oct.  9/18;  4,  .5,  7;  WIA  Oct.   1.5   18;  Ret.  Jan.  11/19;  Trfd.   April 

16/19. 
Pine,  David  B.— Jd.  May  4/19;  7. 
Richards,  Samuel  S.— Jd.  May  28/19;  7. 
Hoe,  Bernard  O.— Jd.  Feb.  6/19;  7. 

Rose,  Russell  F.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3;  GIA  sept.  1.5/18. 
Selement,  Roy  E.— Jd.  April  2/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  22/19. 
Sgutt,  Emanuel  S. — Td.  Oct.  7/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  12/18.  » 

Sudboroufrb,  Alfred  G.— ,Td.  Oct.  5/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  12/18. 
Sweet,  Merrill  S.— Jd.  May  28/19;  7. 

Thomas,  Robert  W.^Jd.  Mav  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd,  Mav  1.5/19. 
Vollenweider,  William  E.— .Id.  May  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  ,5;  WIA   Oct.  27/18. 
Watson,  Samuel  W.— Jd.  Oct.  26/18;  .5,  7. 


TENTH  INFANTRY   IJRlCiADE   HEADQUARTERS 

Brigadier  Generals: 

Dugan,  Thomas  B.— Jd.  March  27/19;  7. 

Gordon,  Walter  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 

Malone,  Paul   B.— Jd.  Aug.  27   18;  3.  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.   March  1/19;  DSM. 

Lieutenant  Colonei,: 

van  de  Steeg,  George  H. — Td.  May  31/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Brigade  Adjutant. 

Major: 

McNamara.  Wallace— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Brigade  Adjutant;  Trfd.  June  10/18. 

Captain  : 

Donoho,  Edniond  S.^d.  .luly  17/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Intilligence  Office;  Trfd.  May  17/19. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Hartshorn,  Obart  V. — Jd.  May  6/19;  7;  Personnel  .\djutant. 

Hinwood,  Joseph  H.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  Aide  de  Camp  to  Brigadier  Gen- 
eral Gordon;  Supply  Officer;  Trfd.  May  22/19. 
Ivy,  Malcolm  H.— Jd.  in' U.  S.;  1,  2;  Intelligence  Officer;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 
O'Neill,  James  A.— Jd.  Aug.  27/18;  3,  4,  .5,  7;  Liaison  Officer;  Trfd.  May  23/19. 
Stettinius,  William  C. — Jd.  in  U.   S.;   1;   .\ide  de   C',itu|)   to   Brigadier   General  Gordon; 
Trfd.  June  27/18. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Caldwell,  Crawford   (V.  C.)— Jd.  May  6/19;  7;  Brigade  Veterinarian. 
We.ston,  Braxton  M.   (V.  C.)-^d.  in"  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Brigade  Veterinarian;  Trfd. 
May  6/19. 


Officers  Who  Served  ivith  the  Fifth  Division  385 

SIXTH   INFANTRY 
Colonels: 

Hunt,  Henry  J.— Jd.  July  28/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trftl.  May  4./19. 

Mullay,  Patrick— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  11/18. 

Newell,  Isaac — Jd.  May  4/19;  7. 

Noble,  Robert  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  2/18. 

Winans,  Edwin  B.— Jd.  May  15/18;  1;  Trfd.  July  11/18. 

lylEUTENANT  CoLONELS: 

Hodges,  Courtney  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  DS  Diy.  Hq.  March  27/19;  DSC. 
Leonard,  John  AV.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WT.V  Oct.  16/18;  Ret.  Nov.  9/18;  Trfd. 

Nov.  22/18;  DSC. 
Norton,  Elliot  M.— Jd.  May  19/18;   1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.   Oct.   18   18. 
Young,  James  J.  L.  (M.C.)"-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  GI.\  Aug.  20/18;  Not  evac. 

Majors: 

Creed,  John  E.— Jd.  Nov.  lU/lS;  7. 

Gill,  William  H.— Jd.  Nov.  9 '18;  5,  7. 

Henley,  Donald— Jd.  Jan.  3/19;  7. 

Huddie.ston,  George  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  4/18. 

McLean,  Felix  R— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4;  WI.\  Oct.  14/18. 

Peyton,  Phillip  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Sept.  2/18. 

Strong,  Paul  D.— Jd.  May  8/19;  7. 

Captains  : 

Bagley,  Thomas  O.— Jd.  in  L^.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  3 '19. 

Bemi.s,  Samuel  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  26/18. 

Bingham,  Wilson  G.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Brock,  John  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  April  fi/19. 

Carlson,  Oscar  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WL\  Oct.  14  18;  Killed  accidentally  Dec.  5/18. 

Casey.  James— Jd.  in  IT.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Crane,  I,eRoy  F.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  25/18;  4,  5,  7. 

DeWclf,  Charles  A.   (D.C.)— Jd.  March  6/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  10/19. 

Edwards,  Basil  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  15/18. 

Edwards,  Carl  E.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  18/19;  7;  Trfd.   April  29   19. 

Engan,  William  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4.  5,  7. 

Faller,  Constantine  P.   (M.C.)— .Id.  .\ug.  30/18;  .3,  4,  5.  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  30   19. 

Febiger,  George  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S. :  1,  2.  3,  4.  5,  7;  WI.\  Nov.  6  '18;  Not  evac. 

Ferris,  George  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  .May  31/18. 

Ferris,  William  E.   (M.C.)— Jd.  April  30/19';  7;  Trfd.  May  7/19. 

Garrison,  Paul  C— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Gholston,  Jabez  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.  5.  7;  WIA   Nov.  6/18;  Ret.  Nov.  13/18;  Trfd. 

Jan.  14/19;  DSC. 
Graham,  Robert  M.— Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2;  KIA  July  20/lS. 
Greer,  Frank  U.— Jd.  April  10/19;  7;  DS  Div.  Hci.April  21/19. 
Harden,  Edmund  E.— Jd.  Nov.  25/18;  7. 

Hartman,  Guy  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1.  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Aug.  17/18;  Not  evac;  DSC. 
Higgins,  Pierre  F.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  4/19. 
Jackson,  William  J.— ,Td.  Nov.  11    18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  8/18. 
Keiser,  Lawrence  B. — Jd.  in  C.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Knox,  Julius  T.— Jd.  Feb.  24/19;  7. 

Leonard,  Edward  W.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KI.V  Oct.  14/18. 
Lindsay,  Roscoe  T.  (M.C.)— .Id.  Feb.  15/19;  7. 
McClaim,  Charles  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

McCollom.  Francis  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  7;  WIA  Aug.  17/18;  Ret.  Nov.  11/18. 
Moore,  James  S.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  Died  June  12/18. 
Mudge.  Josiah  B.— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA  Aug.   17/18;  Ret.  Aug.  28/18;  WIA 

Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Jan.  30/19;  DSC. 
Oldsmith,  Yernon  G.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  Trfd.  June  17/18. 
O'Neal,  Marcus  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Pantzer,  Kurt  F.— Jd.  Jan.  22/19;  7. 


386  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTH  ItiFA'STRY— Continued 

Captains  : — (Continued 

Kandall,  Edwin  H.— Jd.  Oct.  26/18;  5,  7;  WIA   Nov.  6/18;  Ret.  Jan.  17/19;  Trfd.  March 

7/19. 
Handle,  Le.'ilie  C.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  18/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  15/19. 
Hohrer,  Herbert  W.— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  7/19. 
Rudolph,  Myron  P.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  t,  5,  7. 
Schneider,  Frank  V.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  8/18. 
Slieppard,  .Artluir  H.— Jd.  Nov.  11/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  21/18. 
Sigler,  Vane  B.  (M.C.)— .Td.  March  4/19;  7. 

Simoni.s,  Arthur  E.   (M.C.)— Jd.  March  2/19;  7;  Trfd.   March  9/19, 
Sowerbutts.  Samuel  W.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  KIA  Nov.  10/18. 
Sullivan,  Joseph  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Thur.ston,  W.  H.— Jd.  Jan.  21/19;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  6/19. 
Watson,  Archie  C.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  24/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  29/19. 
Weaver,  Maurice  S.  (M.C.)— Jd.  May  8/19;  7. 
Weishaniple,  Jolin  A.— Jd.  Nov.  11/18;  7. 

Wicli.s,  Armon  F.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  1.5/18. 
Wiphtman,  Richard  M.— Jd.  June  lG/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Wilhelm,  Jcseph  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;   WIA   Sept.   12/18;   Not  evac;  WIA  Oct. 

14/18;  Ret.  Jan.  17/18. 
Wysor,  Robert  E.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

First  Lieutenants: 

.'\bram,s,  Cieorge  I,.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  20/18. 

Allen,  Sank  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  26/18;  Ret.  Dec.  17/18;  Trfd.  May  4/19. 

Allen,  Chester  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1 ;  DS  Div.  H<i.  July  9/18. 

Ayres,  Robert  S.— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7. 

Barnes,  Harry  C,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  WIA  July  20/18;  DSC. 

Barth.  Raymond  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  March  29/19. 

Belzer,  Fred  L.— Jd.  Feb.  9/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  5/19. 

Bertschev,  Stanton  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7;  WIA  Sept.  12/18;  Ret.  Oct.  25/18. 

Bounds,  Harvey  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Braun,  Albert  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Oct.  14/18;  Not  evac. 

Brown,  Vories  P.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  KIA  Sept.  14/18. 

Buck,  Maurice  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21/18. 

Burke,  Aubrey  M.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  12/19. 

Burn.s,  Charles  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Burrows,  Robert  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Carew,  John  J.— May  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Nov.  19/18. 

Chaille,  Harold  L— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21/18. 

Clement.  Dwight  R.   (M.C.)— Jd.  April  9/19;  7. 

Coleman,  Frank  R.— Jd.  Jan.  20/19;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  26/19. 

ConnifF,  William  F.— Jd.  July  30/18;  2,  3.  4,  5,  7;  GIA   Aug.  20/18;  Ret.  Aug.  23/18, 

Connelly.  Paul  A.— .Id.  in  u!  S.;  1,  2,  4,  7;  WIA   Oct.   17/18;   Ret.   Feb.  9/19;  Trfd.  May 

Connabie.  Ralph  M. — Id,  in  U,  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  6/19. 

4/19. 
Corbett,  Lacy  W.  (M.C.)— Jd.  April  .30/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  22/19. 
Cox,  Lewis  B.— ,Td.  in  V.  S.;  1.  2,  3;  WIA  .Sejit.  1.3/18. 
Crews,  Raymond  C— Jd,  Oct.  26/18;  5,  7. 
Daniels,  Thomas  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  WIA  Aug.  20/18. 
Donovan,  Ellery  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 

Firth.  Stuart  M.— Jd,  in  U.  S, ;  1,  2,  3;  GIA  Aug.  21/18;  Not  evac.;  Trfd,  Sept,  18/18. 
Fleischer,  Morris  B.  S.  (M.C.)— Jd,  in  II.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  12/19. 
Forev.  Herman  C— .Id.  Feb.  15/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  26/19. 
Fowler,  Oscar  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7. 
Frakcs,  Eugene  N.— Jd.  Feb.  11/19;  7. 

Freeman,  Louis  R.^Jd,  in  U,  S.;  1.  2;  WIA  Aug.  17/18;  DW  Aug.  18/18. 
Gaines,  Leonard  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  AVIA  Sept.  15/18. 
Gammon,  James  P.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  13/18. 
Garlette,  William  A,— Jd,  in  IT,  S,;  7. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division  387 

SIXTH  INFANTRY— C'on^wM/crf 

First  Lieutenants: — Continued 

Garrett,  Hasty  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  15/18;  Ret.  Nov.  14/18;  Trfd.  May 

1/19. 
Golden,  Edward— Jd.  Feb.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  xMardi  13/19. 
Gordon,  Lloyd  W.— Jd.  Nov.  4/18;  5,  7. 

Gormley,  Howard  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  12/18. 

Gray,  WiUiam  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Nov.  10/18;  Ret.  Jan.  30/19. 
Grove,  Clair  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7. 
Hartshorn,  Ubart  V.— Jd.  Feb.  14/19;  Trfd.  March  28/19. 
Haynes,  John  M.^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  15/18. 
Hendricli,  Francis  C.  (M.C.)— Jd.  March  lG/19;  7. 
Holmes,  David  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  1/18. 
Horsley,  Henderson  M. — Jd.  April  19/19;  7. 
Howell,  J.  H.— Jd.  July  11/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21/18. 
Hucks,  James  O.— Jd.  April  20/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  25/19. 
Jamison,  Robert  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Jones,  Louis  V.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  GIA  Aug.  20/18. 
Kernan,  John  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  17/18. 
King,  Gerald  W^— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  7;  Trfd.  March  25/19. 
Leon,  Harry  C— Jd.  Feb.  14/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  1/19. 
Lucy,  Claud  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  12/18;  Ret.  Jan.  13/19;  Trfd.  Mar.h 

25/19. 
McCormicli,  Dell  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

McDuffie,  David  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  24/18;  Ret.  Dec.  16/18. 
McGee,  Richard  S.  (M.C.)— Jd.  June  22/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  24/18;  Ret.  Dec. 

15/18;  Trfd.  March  9/19. 
MacGuire,  Edward  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  6;  Evac.  sk.  Nov.  10/18;  DSC. 
Malsby,  John  D.— Jd.  Nov.  11/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  1/19. 
Martin,  John  T.— Jd.  Nov.  5/18;  6,  7. 

Middleton,  Joiin  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21/18. 
Middleton,  U.  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  15/18. 
Morrison,  Robert  E.— Jd.  Nov.  10/18;  5,  7. 
Mullen,  Roger  H.^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Murpliy,  Joseph  L.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  1/18;  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  12/19. 
Nease,  Stephen  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4;  WIA  Oct.  16/18. 
Niles,  Julius— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  KIA  Sept.  12/18;  DSC. 
Norris,  Benjamin  (D.C.)^Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  27/18. 
Oliver,  William  B.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  14/18;  Ret.  Nov.  16/18. 
Ould,  Robert— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  7;  GIA  Oct.  17/18;  Ret.  Jan.  13/19. 
Phillips,  Francis  H.   (M.C.)— Jd.  May  16/19;  7. 
Preston,  Morgan  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  12/18;  Ret.  Nov.  14/18;  Trfd. 

March  7/19. 
Kavenell,  James  J.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  30/18. 
Kcddy,  William  J.   (M.C.)— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  30/19. 
KIkcr,  Maurice- Jd.  May  22/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  13/18;  DSC. 
Koss,  Robert  B.— ,Td.  Oct.  25/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  24/18. 
Rowland,  Arthur  B.— Jd.  Feb.  10/19;  7. 
Kuthven,  L.  J.-^Id.  Feb.  15/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  7/19. 
Schuff,  Fred  H.— Jd.  Dec.  2/18;  7. 
Sewell,  Toxey  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  18/18. 
Shankland,  Charles— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  15/18. 
Shaver,  Charles  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  13/18. 
Shaw,  Charles  P.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Siegman,  Loua  W. — Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5,  7. 
Smith,  Thomas  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Strother,  Carl  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5;  WIA  Aug.  17/18;  Ret.  Oct.  8/18;  Trfd.   Nov. 

14/18. 
Sullivan,  Waler  M.  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  7. 
Sutton,  Jolin  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  7. 


388  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTH  INFANTRY— (',;;,/;«»,,/ 

First  Lieutenants: — Cunliiiin d 

Swanluncl,  Martin— .Id.  July   ^'(l,  I.S;  •_',  a,  i,  5,  7. 

Teiii))lc,  Arthur  II.   (M.C.)— J(l.  in  I'.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  GIA  Aug.  20/18;  Not  evac;  Trfcl.  Sept. 

20/18. 
Tlionip.son,  James  W. — Jd.  in  V.  S. ;  Trfd.  June  17/18. 
Thomp.son,  William  N. — Id.  Mar.  20/1!);  7. 

Thorngate,  George— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,   t;  WIA  Oct.  M./18;  DSC. 
Tompkins,  Jame.s  F.   (M.C.)— Jd.  April  30/19;  7. 

Walker,  Mitchell  P.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Aug.  17/18;  Not  evac. 
Webb,  Frank  G.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Weltnier,  William  E.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1,5/18. 
White,  John  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.,  .5,  7. 
WiLson,  Andrew  N.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 
Wilson,  Frank  F.— Jd.  Oct.  2C)/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  13/18. 
Wood,  William  K.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1/18. 
Wortendyke,  Keynier  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WI.\  Oct.   14/18;  Ret.  Jan.   1/19. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Abernathy,  Charles  A'.~.Id.  in   f.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.   14/18;  DSC. 

AOison,  Jack  S.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Barton,  Charles  W.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1.  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.   14/18. 

Brown,  Charles  F.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  WLV  Oct.  14/18. 

Brownley,  John  W.— Jd.  Jan.  12/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  15/19. 

Buchanan,  Chester  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2,  3,  .5;  WIA  Aug.   18/18;  Not  evac;   KIA   Nov. 

10/18. 
Bunce,  Floyd  W.— Jd.  Nov.  14,  18;  7;  Trfd.  May  12/19. 
Burkhart,  Merle  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  Trfd.  June  18/18. 

Carter,  Robert  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA  Sept.  14/18;  Ret.  Jan.  1/19;  DSC. 
Chadil,  Edwin  A.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  7/19. 
Clare,  Eugene— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7. 

Claridge,  Ixiyal  T.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;   WIA  Oct.   14/18. 
Corliss,  Carl  W.— Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  7. 
Craig,  Harold— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Crawford,  George  D. — Id.  Feb.  19/19;  7. 

Criswell,  Arthur  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA   Sept.  12/18. 
Culberson,  Frank  xM.- Jd.  Oct.  2(>/18;  5,  7. 
Davis,  Donald   D.— Jd.   Nov.   14/18;  7. 

Dewey,  Harold  L.— Jd.  July  20/18;  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  14/18. 
Downey,   William  J.— Jd.   Oct.  .5/18;  4;  GIA  Oct.   14/18. 
Drasigroch,  Paul  J.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  9/19;  DSC. 
Drevdahl,  Arthur  O— .Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Dunlap,  George  I. — Jd.   Nov.  14/18;  7. 
Eyre,  Wilson  L.— Jd.  Sept.  2(>/18;  4,  5,  7. 
Edwards,  Richard— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Ferguson,  Allan  P.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Ferguson,  George  H.— Jd.  in   I'.   S.;   1,  3,  4,  7;   WIA   Sept.   l(i/18;  Not  evac;   WIA   Oct. 

14/18;  Ret.  Dec  17/18;  DSC. 
Forshire,  Claude  E.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Nov.  (i/18. 
French,  Gardner  A.— .Id.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  WIA  Aug.  18/18. 
Frentz,  H.  J.— .Id.  March  14/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  2ti/19. 
Glenn,  Robert  N.^Id.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  14/18. 
Grant,  Howard— .Td.  in   V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.   15/18. 
Greenlaw,  John  P.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Grigsby,  Willie  B.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4,  5;  KIA  Nov.  10/18. 
Guthrie,  Wyatte  D. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  20/18. 
Haper,   Harry   H.— Jd.  .Tuly   23/18;   2,  .3,   7;    WIA    Aug.    17/18;    Ret.   Aug.   23/18;    WIA 

Sept.  17/18;  Ret.  Dec  2/18. 
Hiirris,  Kenneth  D.— .Id.  Oct.  9/18;  4,  7. 
Harvev,  John  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.   15/18. 
Helveiiston,  Frank  D.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  I,  5,  7. 


Officers  niio  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTH  IXFAXTKY-r„«^«,„',/ 

ilECO.ND     I.IEVTEXAXTS:— t'o«//n«tt/ 

HoUistcr,  Kaymond  G.-Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5;  KIA  Nov   4  18 

Holmes,  Louis  E.— Jd.  May  15/1!);  7.  '      ' 

Horan,  John  P.— Jd.  July  28/18;  1,  2,  5,  7. 

Horn,  Aiiber;  Jd.  Nov.  11./18;  7. 

Horner,  George  L.-,;d.  Nov.  28/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  24/18 

Jacobs,  Kichard  C— Jd.  June  1/18;  1,  2;  WIA  June  19/18 

Jones,  William  T.— Jd.  Oct.  25/18;  5,  7. 

Jenkins,  Sidney  P.-^d.  Oct.  8/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  2(i/19 

Jutz.  John  F.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  KIA  Sent.  12/18 

Koester,  Phillip  U.— Jd.  March   13   iq-  7 

Lindquist    Carl  A.-Jd.  July  18/18;  2,' 3,' 7;  WIA  Sept.   12/18;  Ret    Dec    27/18 

Marcus,   Walter  M.-Jd.  May  20/18;   1,  2;  Trfd.   Aug.  21/18  ^  '' 

Marck,  Fred.-Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14   18;  DW  Oct    •>0/18 

Martin,  William  M.— Jd.  May  21/19-  7  •  ^'^   u"-  -VI8. 

Montgomery,  Leonard  L.-Jd.  in  U.S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  5/18 

Moora,  Bernard  P.-Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  14/19         ' 

Morris,  Robert  F.— Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  Trfd    Nov    •'■V18 

Morrow,  James-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  10/18  ' 

Mu    enhagen,  Carl  W.-Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  24/19. 

Muller,  Max— Jd.  m  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.  5,  7. 

Mulvey,  Justin  V.— Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  7. 

Nash,  Joseph  A.-^d.  May  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug   18/18 

Noel,  James  D.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18 

Nolan,  Albert  J.— Jd.  Mav  20/18;  1,  2   7 

Nolan,  George  D.-Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18 

Oakes,  Nelson  W.-Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  1.5/19 

OConnell    Franci.s-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  WIA   Aug.   17/18. 

r^'K^^'h,    T'''  °~^''-  ^°^-  1*/^^'  ^'  Trfd.  April  23/19. 

ONeal,  Wa  ter  R-Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  24/19. 

Orr,  Donald  J.-Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Jan    12/19 

Pennmgton,  Edgar  J.— Jd.  May  19/19;  7.  ^ 

Phillips,  Harold  W.-^d.  Oct.  9/18;  4   5    7 

Pierre,  Bertram  A.-^d.  May  29/18;  i,  2,  3;  Evac.  sk.  Oct    13/18 

Pomeroy,  Harold  W.^d.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oc       4/  s" 

Prentice,  Melvm  J.-Jd.  July  2H/18;   1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21/18 

Price,  Harold  S.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  WIA  Oct    14/18  ' 

Price,  James  P.-Jd.  May  13/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  17/18 

Ramsay    Merril  F.-Jd.  May  23/18;  1,  2;  WIA  .Vug.  18/18 

Heily,   Thomas  G.-Jd.  Nov.   14/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  5/19 

Richards,  Cliff— Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  7.  y     '     ■ 

Kobertson,  Harold  H.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  GLV  Oct    0VI8 

Uoche,  John  C.-Jd.  Oct.  .5/18;  4;  MIA  Oct    14/18 

Kogers,  Lynn— Jd.  Oct.  6/18;  4;  WIA  Oct    14/18 

Koss,  Noble  G.-Jd.  Oct.  6V18;  4;  KIA  Oct   14/18 

Sallye,  Thomas  E.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18 

Scheel,  Louis— Jd.  March  15/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  9/19 

Sclnineman,  Herman  G.— Jd.   Nov.   13/18-  7 

Sewoski.  Benjamin  T.-Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4;  KIA  ()<-t.  14/18 

Sheep,  Harry-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  April  25/18 

Shields,  Addis  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3,  5,  7. 

Shields,  John  O.—Jd.  Nov.  14/18;V.' 

Skeels,  Irving  T.— Jd.  Nov.  13/18;  7;  Trfd    Mav  1/19 

Smith,  Carrol  W.-^d.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Stapleton,  Gordon— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,'  7;  DSC 

Steel,  Edwin  S.—Jd.  Nov.  14/18; '7.' 

Strecker,  George  O.— .Id.  Feb.   18/19;  7 

Swink.  Milo-Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan   31/10 

Thomas,  Jolm  R.-,ld.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  WIA  Aug.  17/18. 


389 


390  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

SIXTH  INFANTRY— C'o«<i"n«e(Z 

Second  Lieutenants: — Continued 

Tubbs,  Lon  V.-^d.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  WTA  Oct.  lt/18. 

Tattle,  Edward  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21/18. 

Vetter,  George  N.— Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  i,  7. 

Wade,  Clearfield  P.— Jd.  Nov.  11/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  26/19. 

Walton,  Francis  C.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  22/18. 

Weir,  Samuel  E..  Jr— .Jd.  Nov.  U/\»\  7;  Trfd.  May  25/19. 

Whitlock,  Harold  P.— Jd.  March  22/19;  7. 

Wilkins,  William  J.— Jd.  Oct.  5/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Winquist,  Lennart— Jd.  Nov.  28/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  24/18. 

Wright,  Thomas^Jd.  Feb.  25/19;  7. 


ELEVENTH   INFANTRY 
Colonels: 

Bennet,  John  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  20/18. 
Peck,  Robert  H.— Jd.  Oct.  30/18;  5,  7;  DSC,  DSM. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Binford,  Robert  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  21/18. 

Cron,  Anton  C— Jd.  Jan.  22/19;  7. 

West,  R.  John— Jd.  Oct.  23/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  17/18;  DSC. 

Ma  jobs: 

Barlow,  Everett  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Evac.  .sk.  Sept.  19/18. 

Benton,  Fred  G.-^Jd.  Oct.  25/18;  5,  7. 

Birmingham,  Richard  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Bookmyer,  Ralph  H.  (M.C.)— Jd.  June  12/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Trfd.  April  7/19. 

Crank,  Paul— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  14/19. 

Dodd,  Brendan  J.-^d.  May  10/19;  7. 

Duvall,  Louis  E.— Jd.  April  28/19;  7. 

Kingman,  Ralph  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  June  10/18. 

Lukcns,  Phillip  J.   (M.C.)^Jd.  March  19/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  12/19. 

Mahin,  Frank  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Muncaster,  John  H.— Jd.  July  3/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  25/18;  DSC. 

Kay.  Wood  L.— Jd.  April  30/19;  7. 

Rudoli)h,  Martin  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  20/18;  Ret.  Jan.  5/19;  DSC. 

StuU,  George  C.  (Chaplain)~Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  7. 

Ward,  I.  T.— Jd.  Dec.  19/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  23/19. 

Wimer,  Benjamin  E.— Jd.  April  11/19;  7. 

Captains: 

Adamson,  Harry— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Baldwin,  Geoffrey  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  25/18. 

Barnes,  Russell— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

BUss,  James  G.— Jd.  Oct.  20/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  Ui/19. 

Boatwright,  John  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Campbell,  Charles  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  14/18. 

Chancy,  Clyde  G.— Feb.  20/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Chase,  Thornton— Jd.  Feb.  21/19;  7. 

Clark,  Mark  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  WIA  June  15/18. 

Colvin,  Ewing  D.— ,Jd.  Oct.  27/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  3/19. 

Cotton,  Richard  B.— Jd.  Nov.  20/18;  7. 

Cowart,  Walter  G.— Jd.  Oct.  22/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  4/19. 

Crawford,  Frank  E.— Jd.  Nov.  18/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  16/18. 

Cromwell,  Joseph— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Cutler,  O.  M.— Jd.  Nov.  19/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  7/19. 

Dashiell,  George  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  S;  KIA  Nov.  10/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  tdth  the  Fifth  Division  391 

ELEVENTH   IKYASTKY—Coutiniird 

Captains: — Continued 

Dueber,  Phillip  J.— Jd.  Feb.  15/19;  7. 

Elkins,  John  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA   Oct.   17/18;  Ret.  Nov.  20/18;  DS  Div. 

Hq.  Fel).  22/19. 
Es.slinger,  Jose])h  P.— Jd.  Jan.  24./19;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 
Farmer,  James  T.— Att.  Jan.  16/19;  Det.  Jan.  23/19. 

Firman,  Kenton  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Oct.  29/19;  Ret.  Feb.  8/19. 
Fitzsinnnons,  .\lbert  F. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  2.5/18. 
Freeman.  Arthur  W.— Jd.  Feb.  6/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 
Gardner,  William  J.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Evac.sk.  Nov.  21/18. 
Hanlen,  John  Ci.  I.. — Id.  Nov.  19/18;  7;  DS  Div.  Hq.  Feb.  2-1./19- 
Harris.  .John  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  WIA  Nov.  7/18. 

Hartinff,  We.sley  W.^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  1,  5,  7;  WI.V  Sept.  12/18;  Ret.  Oct.  22/18. 
Hayden.  Claude  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7. 
Henley,  Donald— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  9/18. 
Hen.sley,  Charles  E.   (M.C.)-,Id.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Heraty",  Franci.s  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  +;  WI.\   Oct.  15/18. 
Hinwnod,  .lo.seph  R.— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Hubbell.  Stuart  D.— Jd.  May"  20/18;  1,  2,  3,   I;   KIA  Oct.   U/18. 
.lones,  Edward  F.— Jd,  Nov."  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.   17/18. 
Landreth,  Norton  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1/18. 
I.onginire,  John  P. — Jd.  Feb.  17/19;  7. 

Lukert,  Edward  P. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;   WIA   Sept.  13/18;  Ret.  Nov.  10/18. 
McCabe,  Frederick— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  6/18. 
McGann,  Harry  K.— Jd.  Feb.  19/19;  7. 
Macrae,  Frank  W.— >Id.  Dec.  15/18;  7;  Trfd.   F.li.   17/19. 
Massy,  Harvey  N.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  19/18;  7. 
Maxwell,  .\llen  B.— Jd.  Nov.  18/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  1/19. 

Melcy,  Edward  J.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3,  t,  5,  7:  WIA   Oct.  18/18;  Ret.  Oct.  31/18. 
Munro,  George  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  3/18. 
Murphy,  John  J.— Jd.  Nov.  26/18;  7. 

0'Dani"el,  ,Iohn  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Sept.  12/18;  Ret.  Oct.  22/18:  DSC. 
O'Neal,  Daniel  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  26/18. 
O'Neil,  Ralph  T.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5, "7;  Trfd.  May  6/19. 
Reaves,  Harry  I..— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Rollins.  Joe— Jd.  Dec.  29/18;  7;  Trfd.  .Ian.  28/19. 
Ryan,  William  G— .Id.  May  21/18;  1,  2,  .3.  4.  .5.  7;  WIA  Oct.  20   18;  Not  evac. ;  Trfd.  May 

10/19. 
Sackett,  George  W.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  .3.  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 
Shaw,  William— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  12/18. 
Skeggs,  Frank  B.-^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  15/18. 
Stacey,  James  H.— Jd.  July  19/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  14/18. 
Stin.son,  Harry  C.-^d.  in  "u.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  3/19. 
Trask,  Leo  S.   (M.C.)^Id.  Nov.  26/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  5/19. 
Tyler,  Herman  A.   (M.C.)— Jd.  May  11/19;  7. 
Weldon,  George  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,2,  3,  4;  WI.\  Oct.  29/18. 
Williams,  Adrian— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June   12/18. 
Williams,  Wallace— Jd.  Nov.  5/18;  5,  7. 
Woods,  Philip  S.— Jd.  in  V  .S.;  1,  2,  3;  GIA  Sept.  12/18. 
Zion.  Peter  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WI.V  Oct.   15/18;   Ret.  Jan.   IS,  19;  Trfd.   May 

10/19. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Airey,  Charles  T. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  29/18. 

Alverson,  John  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Anderson,  Weston  R.   (D.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  20/19;  7. 

Battee,  Leo  .\.— Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Boerke,  Edison  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  WI.V  June  15/18. 

Boone,  Daniel  H.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  6/18. 

Bradfield,  Loyd— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  29/19. 


392  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ELEVENTH   INFANTRY— Continued 

First  Lieutenants : — Cuntinued 

Bruce,  John  D.— Jd.  Oct.  7/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Bryant,  Fred  S.— Jd.  Sept.  19/18;  4,  5;  WLV  Nov.  6/18. 

Buck,  James  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Budy,  Edward  W.— Jd.  Nov.  19/18;  7. 

Burns,  Ellis  P.  (M.C.)— Jd.  July  10/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  4/18. 

Butler,  Braxton  D.— Jd.  Nov.  6/18;  5,  7. 

Buttolph,  Lyman  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  29/18. 

Cater,  Silas  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Catozzi,  Alfred  H.— Jd.  Nov.  1/18;  S,'7. 

Chase,  R.  L.   (D.C.)— Jd.  Feh.  10/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  1/19. 

Craft.  James  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Crandall,  Fred  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  .5/19. 

Crocker,  Augustus  O.— Jd.  July  13/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Crofoot,  Frank  L.— Jd.  Nov.  1/18;  .5;  WL\  Nov.   6/18;  Died  pneumimia  Nov.  22/18. 

Daly,  Claude  C— Jd.  Nov.  19/18;  7. 

Dancy,  Bryan  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  15/18. 

Davant,  Guy  H.;  Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  16/18. 

Davenport,  William  C— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Davis,  Robert  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  KIA  Sept.  13/18. 

DePass,  Ernest  T.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  13/18. 

Donoho,  Edward  S.— Jd.  in  LT.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  28/18.  ; 

Driskell,  William  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Dunne.  Richard  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Durkin,  Hugh  L,— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA   Oct.   19/18;  Ret.  Dec.  23/18;  Trfd. 

April  3/19. 
Edwards,  Garnett  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Nov.  6/18;  Ret.  Feb.  2/19. 
Ehrle,  F.  C.  (D.C.)— Jd.  July  19/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  14/18. 

Evans,  FerroU'E.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Faller,  Charles  F.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 
Gettle,  McKinlev— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  18/19. 
Goifard,  Joseph"  J.^Id.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Graves,  Phillip  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  .3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  1.5/18. 

Gray,  Robert  W.— Jd.  Jan.  17/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  3/19. 

Hackler,  James  F.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Evac.  sk.  Dec.  1/18. 

Hampv.  Ernest  E.— Jd.  Oct.  7/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Hand," Thomas  E.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.  5,  7 ;  Trfd.  Jan.  30/19. 

Hancock,  Frank  W.— Jd.  in   V.  S.;   1,  2,  .3,  4,  7;  GIA  Oct.  21/18;  Ret.  Dec.  23/18;  Trfd. 
April  8/19. 

Hannig,  Emil  A.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5.  7;  WIA  Nov.  10/18;  Ret.  Jan.  28/19;  Trfd. 
April  18/19. 

Haynes,  Jlelvin  R.— Jd.  Oct.  4   18;  4,  5,  7. 

Henry,  Thomas  E.— Jd.  Oct.  23/18;  .5.  7;  WIA  Nov.  5/18;  Ret.  Nov.  20/18. 

Herbert,  Wilbur  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  I,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  17/18. 

Herrick,  Ralph  W.— Jd.  Jan.  27/19;  7. 

Hilburn,  Oscar  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Kite,  Fontaine  (D.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  22/18:  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Hofacre,  Michael  H.— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Horner,  Wheeler  B.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WL\  Oct.  15   18. 

Humiihrey,  RoUand  <).— .Id.  Oct.  1/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Illff,  Theiidore  L.— Jd.  Sept.  27/18;  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.   Ai.ril  18/19. 

Jackson,  John  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Evac.  sk.  May  20/18. 

James,  Linton  S.^Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  GIA  Sept.  14/18. 

Jansma,  Lewis— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Johnson,  Henry  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18.  , 

Johnson,  W.  A.— .Td.Dec.  19/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Jones,  Percival  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  21/18. 

Jones,  Thomas  E.— .Id.   Nov.  7/18;  5.  7. 

Ke.iiic.  James  E.— Jd.  May  18/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division  393 

ELEVEXTH   ISFASTRr-Conlinued 
First  Lieutenants:— CV«(<ma(?d 

Kempski,  FelLx  A.  — Jd.  May  8/1!)-  7 

Lacklen,  Jesse  ( Chaplain )-Jd.  Feb.  U/lfl;  7;  Trfd.  Feb    25/19 

Lan,p,„an,  Leonard  H.-Jd.  N.,v.  19/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan   29/19 

Lane   I^  rank  R.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  U/IS 

Leach,  James  A.-Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5^7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19 

Levin,  Eh  (M.C.)— Jd.  March  1/19;  7 

Lewis,  McDaniel  L.— Jd.  Nov.  9/19;  g,  7 

Lincoln,  Kenneth  C— Jd.  May  6/19-  7 

Lothrop    Douglas  L.-Jd.  Xo^.  7/18';  5,  7;  Trfd.  .Vpril   1.V19 

Lowry,  Edwin  J.— Jd.  Xov.  0/18;  5,  7 

Luden,  John  F.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  WIA  June  2.5   18 

Lyons,  William  A.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  .5    7  ' 

McDonald,  Clyde  B.— Jd.  May  2()/I9i  7' 

McDonald,  George  H.— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4  5   7 

Mcllwain,  James  C— Jd.  in  L'   S  •  I    ■>   4  i    ^    -    •!■  <■ )    . 

McKee,  George  H.-Jd.  in  l' S  ;' 1,  2;  T;fd     Vu'g   18     8    "'■  '"'''■ 

McMullen,  George  F.-Jd.  Nov.  18/18-  7  ^     ^       ' 

McVeigh,  William  J.   {Chaplain)-^Jd.'Auff   29/18-  •?    J.    ^    -     t  <.  1     t 

McWhinney,  John  W.-Jd.  Nov.  3/18;  5^7  '     '     '  ''   ^''^'^-  ■^""-  ^'^/l"- 

Mantle,  Thomas  (Cliaplain)— Jd     \iio-'  '>fi/IN.  11     t  tA    ^  ^   ^ 

Mendell,  Murray  >I.-Jd.  Oct.  19")8f4:r7:  TrM   J^' ^n/'/^'' 

Merrick,  John  C.-Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  5,  7-  T^fd    Fei;  ^Vlf 

Miles   Edgar  C.-Jd.  Sept.  2fi/18;'4,'5,V   Vjfd   Dec   17/'l    ' 

Poinc.^,  Harry  K.j:..1:A^;^;^.?;-^-     ^^ 

p>^=l:^;^i^"^s^--^-1,--s^/v.. 

Price,  Chester  F-Jd.  in  U.  S.;     ,  2;  WM  Aug^/'i?         ^ 

Pyles,  Miner  R.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5:7      ^^^       ' 

Ricamore,  Phillip  AV'.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18-  5   7 

Rich,  David  A.— ,Td.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7    ' 

Ross,  William  F.— Jd.  Xov.  6/19-  5    7 

Runyon.  Walter-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,2,3,  4;  Evac    sk    Oct   31    IS 

Salbreiter,  B.   (Chaplain)-Jd.  May  20/19-  7 

Sandmeyer,  Earl  S.— Jd.  Nov.  10 /is-  .57'' 

Schaffer,  John-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,' 4-  WLV  Sent    l-^'.s 

Seese,  William  R.-Jd.  Nov    9   18     5    7     Fv»^  ^fl'\  ^^z  !«• 

Seipp,  Arthur  W.-Jd.  Ort   4/18;  4!  5.  ;  '''•  ^^"'  '^''- 

Shanklin,  Almeron— Jd.  in  U    S  •  /  •>   -^    1     t-ti    /^  .    , 

Shanahan.  Robert  E -Jd    Mav ';4/I8"'  t  V  ^iK^'^'  ^''^^'  ^^C. 

Shaw.  Cedric  H.-Jd.  in  r.'s     12,^  KI  (  Oc  '  Uns^'''  ""''■  '''''■'  '"^'-  ^'^'-  ^1/18 

Shaw.  Roland  W.-Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  .5,  7.  ^ 

Showalter,  John  E. — Jd    in  11    S  '   1'  o    o    nrr  .    ^      . 

Slaughter,  Theron  H.-Jd"  ^la;2j-18':  l\  l\i,  ^     Jf^ls" 

Smith,  Emda  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2   3   4    5    7  ' 

Smith,  Norfleet  S.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,'  3!  4';  DW  Oct    -O'lS 

Staples,  Z.  C.-Jd.  May  10/18;  Trfd.   Mav  20/18 

S  eT""'  ^T:t^^'— ^^''  '"  ^'-  S'  1.  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18  18 

S  etfnius   Williani  C.-J,l.  June  27/18;  1,  2,  3;  GIA  Sept    WIS 

Stevens,  George  R.— Jd.  May  20/18-  1    o   q    .    L    ,,'1  ^    J"'   '-/l*^- 

Nov.  7/18.  ^  '    '  "'  ^'  *"^'  ^  ^-^  ^"-P*-  12/18;  Ret.  Oct.  1.5/18;  WL\ 

Stilwell,  Robert  L.— Jd.  Oct.  19/18-  457 

Stinson,  Harry  M.—ld.  in  U.  S.;  l]  2;  Trfd    \u.    7/T8 
Stuart,  Walter  P.-.Td.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Tr  d   May  1/19 
Swanner,  Charles  D.-^d.  Nov.  8/18    5    w/'v  Vov    10/18 
Swmt,  Blakely  R.— Jd.  in  U    S  -  1    9    q   T^  ',    ?{ 

Taskett    Her,;ert  A.-.ld.  Ly  20/18; 'US-  ■tu?l8;;8"'- 
Tharp.  Lawrence  M.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug  30>18 


394  Hisiunj  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ELEVENTI I    INF AWniY—Vontinu<jd 

FjRST    I  .lEHTENA  XTS  : (  '(JlltillUI'd 

Thomas,  Flnyil   E.— Jd.  Dec.  23/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  29/19. 

Town.scnd,  Edpir  15.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  a,  4.,  .5,  7;  GIA  Oct.  17/18;  Not  evac. 

\an  Horn,  John  D.   (C  l)a]ilain)— .Id.  July  10/18;  2,  3,  i,  5,  7;  WI.V  Nov.  (i/18;  Not  evac. 

Vo.shcll,  Vilo  M.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  22/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  6/19. 

Ward,  Samuel   K.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aufr.  22   18. 

W'atlvin.s,  Edward  M.— ,Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Watson,  Archie  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Evac.  .sk.  Nov.  6/18. 

Weaver,  Maurice  S.  (M.C.)— Jd.  June  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  13/19. 

Widainan.  Clvde  F.— Jd.  Nov.   18/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  29/19. 

Williaius,  Jolin  D.   (D.C.)— .Id.  May  3/19;  7. 

Williams,  Thomas  ().   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5;  Trfd.  Nov.  19/18. 

Wolford,  Clair  E.— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Young,  Oliver  E.— Jd.  Oct.  28/18;  5,  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Adams,  Edward — Id.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  31    18. 

Adams,  Harry  A.— Jd.   Nov.   13/18;  7;  Trfd,  May   13/19. 

A'Hearn,  Leonard  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  21    18. 

Aldridge,  George  P.-^Id.  Nov.  6/18;  5,  7. 

Armstrong,  Howard  J.^Jd.  Nov.  6/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  ,Ian.  28/19. 

Hader,  H.  J.— Jd.  Nov.  1/18;  5,  7. 

IMair,  Earl  A.— Jd.  Nov.  13/18;  7. 

Blakelv,  \'ictor  K.  D.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

HIedsoe,  Koliert  J— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  8/18. 

Bolt.  John  E.— Jd.  Jan.  17/19;  7. 

Brooks,  Herman  T.— ,Td.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Butler,  John- A.— .Id.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Bvron,  Rohert  S.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Callahan,  Thonuis — Td.  Oct.  4/18;  Discli.  Dec.  27/18. 

Cardinal,  Louis  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  26/18. 

Cates,  Jay  E.- Jd.  Oct.  26/18;  5,  7;  WI.A,  Nov.  5/18;  Not  evac. 

Clark,  Leo  G.— Jd.  Oct.  23/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  29/19;  DSC. 

Clifton,  Frank  J. — Td.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Coll.y,  Ralph  D.— Jd.  July  25/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Conwav,  Ewing  D. — Jd.  Jan.  17/19;  7. 

Crull,  Rohert— Jd.  Oct.  13/18;  4,  5;  WIA  Nov.  7/18. 

Cummings,  Patrick  J.— Jd.  Oct.  13/18;  KIA  Oct.  20/18. 

Dent,  Claude  S.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Evac.  sk.  April  20/19. 

Duffy,  Charles  A.— Jd.  July  24/18;  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18;  DW  Oct.  15/18. 

Ecton,  Frank  C— .Td.  Oct."  4/18;  4,  5.  7. 

Edmonds,  George  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Eldridge,  Edwin  H.— .Td.  Nov.  9  18;  5,  7. 

Fabian,  Emil  M.— .Td.  May  6/19;  7. 

Fawn,  John  J.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Gamble,  Robert— Jd.  in   V.  S.;   1,  2,  3;  KIA   Sept.   12/18. 

Clault,  Irwin— ,Td.  Oct.  14/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Greenwood,  Albert  E.— Jd.  Nov.  13/18;  7;  Trfd.  .Tan.  28/19. 

Guise,  Jesse  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  12/18;  DW  Jan.  1.5/19. 

(hivnn.  Mack  S.— .Td.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.   14/18. 

Harris,  Jesse  E.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Hebblewaite,  Mark  P.— Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7;  Evac.  sk.  Dec.  23/18. 

Heeg,  William  F.— Jd.  Aug.  2/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Heinisch,  H.  G.— Jd.  Mar.  11/19;  7;  Trfd.  Mar.  27/19. 

Herrod,  Harrv— Jd.  Mav  20/19;  7;   Evac.  sk.  M.ay  27/19. 

Hey  wood,  Francis  C— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  5/18. 

Hill,  AVilliam  M.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.   18/18. 

Ilonness,  Clement  F. — Jd.  Jan.  14/19;  7. 

Horton.  Harry  C— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  -i.  4;   KIA  Sept.  13   18. 

Huey,  Frank— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  tcith  the  Fifth  Divmon  395 

ELE\  EXTH    ISFASTHY—Contlnuf'd 

SECONn  Lieutenants : — Continued 

James,  Henry— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Disch.  May  17/19. 

James,  Raviiioncl  H.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Jensen,  Carl  O.— Jd.  Oet.  li/is;  4;  WIA  Oct.  11/18. 

Jefferson,  Robert  W.— Jd.  March  16/19;  7. 

Johnson,  Harrison  W.— .Id.  Oct.  U/18;  i,  5,  7. 

JoUev,  Ronald  W.— Jd.  April  8/19;  7. 

Jones,  Albert  E.  D.— ,ld.  May  20/18;  1,  2,  3;  \VI.\  Scjit.  12/18. 

Kauffman,  Clarence  E.— ,Id.  Oct.  4./18;  -1;  WI.V  Oct.  1.5/18. 

Konietzko.  Gustave — Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Lambert,  Bennett  G.— Jd.  Oct.  V18;  4,  5;  WI.V  Nov.  7/18. 

Lemon,  WilHam— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2;  WI.V  Aug.  18/18. 

Lil)pincott,  Jesse  B.— Jd."in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Liska,  Clarence  .-V.— Jd.  Oct.  1/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Lowe,  Clarence  C— Jd.  Nov.  2/18;  5,  7. 

MacLav,  Donald  E.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

McAlli.ster,  Samuel  W.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  -5,  7;  Trfd.  May  1/19. 

McCargo,  Donald  J.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

McCormack,  John  L.— Jd.  July  24/18;  2,  3,  4,  7;  Trfd.  .Ian.  29/19. 

McCulloch,  William  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .Vug.   17   18. 

McLain,  Raymond  E.— Jd.  Nov.  5/18;  5,  7. 

McNamara,  Leo  C— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.  14   18. 

Mears,  Judson— <Id.  Nov.  13/18;  7. 

Mees,  Reinhold  C.^Id.  July  16/18;  2.  3,  4,  7;  WL\  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Nov.  20/18. 

Mehl,  Fred  C— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WI.^  Oct.  20/18. 

Mehnert,  Cieorge  F.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WI.A  Oct.  14/18. 

Meyer,  Emil  B.— Jd.  July  25/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  28/18. 

Meyers,  A.  A.— Jd.  Nov."  1/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  4/19. 

Miller,  Welty  A.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  KIA  Oct.   15/18. 

Monell,  George  B.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7. 

Morrow,  Guy  H.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  17/18. 

Nelson,  Peter  R.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  13/19. 

Neylon,  Edward  A.— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.   May  13/19. 

Ousterhaut,  L.  C— Jd.  Oct.  23/18;  5;  WI.V   Nov.  5/18. 

Peterson,  John— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  7;  WI.V   Oct.  21/18;   Ket.  Nov.  28/18. 

Pittman,  William  P.— Jd.  May  6/19;  7. 

Pridgen,  R.  H.— ,Id.  .Vjjril  29/19;  7. 

Pyle,  John  H  — ,Id.  .Vug.  3/18;  2,  3;  KIA  Sept.   12/18. 

Randoli)h,  John  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Reed,  Hugh  A.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  7;  WI.V   Oct.   14/18;   Ret.   Nov.  2;;/18. 

Rhodes.  Bernard  L.— .Id.  Nov.  7/18;  5,  7. 

Rice,  R.  M.— ,Id.  July  19/18;  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  31    18. 

Roe,  Bernard  C— Jd.  Oct.  10/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  1/19. 

Royer,  William  R.— Jd.  July  2.5/18;  KIA  Oct.  16/18. 

Saint,  John  M.^Id.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WI.V  Oct.  14/18. 

Schaupp,  John  W.— .Id.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4;  GIA  Oct.  20/18. 

Schnebb,  K.  J.— Jd.  July  30/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.   18/18. 

Schuder.  Roily  M. — Id.  Oct.  9/18;  4;  WI.V  Oct.  15/18;  Ret.  Jan.  12   19. 

Seidel,  Frank"  (V.C.)—Jd.  April  28/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  6/19. 

Shaffer,  Edgar  C— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  io/19. 

Shepi.ard,  Barney  L.— Jd.  .Vug.  3/18;  2,  3,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Smith,  John  C— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WLV  Oct.  15/18. 

Snyder,  George— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Soper,  Harold  S— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .Vug.  7/18. 

Stroer,  Henry— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WIA   Oct.   14/18. 

Stukhart,  George— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4;  WI.V  Oct.  14/18. 

Sweeney,  John  G.— Jd.  Dec.  19/18;  7. 

Taylor,"  Ray— Jd.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Thomson,  A.  T.^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 


396  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

ELEVENTH   INFANTRY— Continued 

Second  Liexitenakts : — Continued 

Tippett,  Ralph  W.— Jd.  May  20/18;  1,  2.  3;  KIA  Sept.  12/18, 

Tracy,  Cecil  H.-^d.  Oct.  VIS;  WIA  Oct.  21/18. 

Walker,  Cliarle.s  D.— Jd.  July  23/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.   18/18. 

Whitehou.se.  Edwin  H.— .Id.  "in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  July  7/18;  Ret.  Aug.  8/18;  WIA 

Oct.  16/ 18. 
Worth,  Hamilton— J d.  Nov.  S)   18;  5,  7. 
Wright,  Harold  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
Yontz,  Patricli^Id.  Nov.  9/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 


FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION 

LlETTTENANT   CoiONET.: 

Grimes,  William  M.— Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2,  3,  1,  5,  7. 

Major: 

Muncaster,  John  H.— Jd.  May  17/18;  1;  Trfd.  June  22/18. 

Captains: 

Burges.s,  Frederick  V.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WIA   Sept.   13/18;   Ret.   N.iv.   16/18;   DS 

Div.  Hq.  Jan.  21/19;  DSC. 
Cox,  William  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;   1,  2,  3,  t,  .5.  7;  GI.\  Aug.   1(>'18;   Not  evac;  Trfd.   April 

8/19. 
Doe,  Jen.s  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  10/18. 
Farmer.  James  T.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 
Griner,  George  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  l,  .5,  7. 
Hamhlen,  Archelaus  L. — Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1/18. 
Haskell,  Frank  E.— Jd.  July  24/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  1/18. 

Irving,  Frederick  A.— Jd.  iii  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  WI.V  Sept.  12/18;  Ret.  Dec.  10   18. 
Moore,  Buhl— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7. 
Koherts,  Gilbert  M.  (M.C.)-^Td.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Rossell,  Daves— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4;  DW  Oct.  14   18. 
Stacey,  James  H.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  7;  Trfd.  May  4/19. 
Vinzant,  W.  D.— Jd.  Nov.   12/18;  Trfd.   Nov.  14/18. 
Wersehe,  George  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Accidentally  killed  .lu!y  18/18. 
Williams,  Wallace— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  18/19. 

FinsT  Lieutenants: 

Hliss,  Paul  P.— Jd.  Feb.  2(i/19;  7. 

Brown,  Byron  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  WI.\  July  22/18. 

Gehres,  Floyd  E.— Jd.  Aug.  20/18;  Trfd.  Aug.  23/18. 

Hammond,  Arthur  B.— Jd.  May  8/19;  7. 

Hartshorn,  Obart  V.— Jd.  April  10/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  7/19. 

Hilgartner,  Andrew  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Kotmehl,  William  H.— .Td.  Oct.   7/18;  4,  5,  7;  DSC. 

Leon,  Harry— Jd.  April  1/19;  7. 

Marcovitz,  Solomon— Jd.  Aug.  29/18;  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Mitciiell,  Lucullus  N.  D.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3,  4,  7;  WIA  Oct.  14/18;  Ret.  Nov.  lfi/18. 

Mitchell,  WiUiam  R.  K.— Jd.  May  26/18;  1;  Trfd.  July  7/18. 

Morgan,  Earl  A.^Id.  May  28/19;  7. 

Murray,  Edward  M.— .Id.  "in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  2.5/18. 

O'Neill,  James  A.— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  7. 

Owens,  William  I.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4.  .5.  7. 

Ruthven,  Lee— Jd.  April  7/19;  7. 

Thomp.son,  Frank  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3;   KIA  .Sept.   12/18. 

Ughetta,  Peo  J.  C— Jd.  May  24/18;  1,  2,  4,  .5,  7. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Bivision  397 

FIFTEENTH  MACHINE  GUN  BATTALION— Confmucrf 

First  Lieutexaxts: — Continued 

Ward,  James  Clay-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 

Willis,  Joseph  G.— Jd.  Aug.  19/18;  2,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  25/19. 

V  .!on,  Josephus  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  14/18;  DSC. 

U  r.nn,  Francis  J.^d.  May  22/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Adams,  Omer-Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  15/19. 

Carr,  Richard  S.— Jd.  Oct.  18/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  20/19. 

Carroll,  Francis  A.— .Id.  Nov.  16/18;  7. 

Chri,stensen,  Alliert— Jd.  Dec.  12/18;  7. 

Christopherson,  Fritz  A. — Jd.  April  20/19;  7. 

Dorwart,  George  M.-^d.  July  24/18;  2,  3;  WIA  Sept.  12/18. 

Dowe,  John  I.— Jd.  May  22/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  19/18. 

Downer,  Robert  H.  G.Ajd.  Nov.  14/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Erdman,  William  H.— Jd.  Dec.  15/18;  7;  Evac.  sk.  Dec.  29/18. 

Ferrell,  Glover  B.— Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7. 

Fluhart,  Jesse  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Died  Feb.  15/18. 

Frater,  Homer  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Evac.  sk.  July  20/18. 

Glidewell,  John  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  GLV  Aug.  16/18;  Ret.  Aug.  20/18. 

Kriesfeld,  David  A.— Jd.  Dec.  13/18;  7. 

McVickar,  Herbert  K.— Jd.  Nov.  14/18;  Trfd.  Dec.  16/18. 

Mitchell,  James  O.^d.  Nov.  14/18;  7. 

Moon,  Benjamin— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Neill.  Henry  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2;  WIA  Aug.  17/18;  DSC. 

Pellette,  Arthur  J.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Phifer,  Jacob  J.— Jd.  April  21/19;  7. 

Rhoades,  George  W.— Jd.  Nov.  13/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  (i/19. 

Schively,  E.  Dixon-^d.  Oct.  6/18;  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Schlesinger,  Alexander  I..— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Trfd.  April  10/19. 

Smith,  Richard  J.— Jd.  Nov.  13/18;  7. 

Steinberg,  Louis — Jd.  May  30/19;  7. 

Volk,  Floyd  F.— Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  8/18. 

Washburn,  Winthrop  D.— Jd.  Nov.  13/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  6/19. 

Watson,  Samuel  W.— Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 


FIFTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY  BRIGADE  HEADQUARTERS 

Brigadier  Generals: 

Craig,  D.  F.— Jd.  April  10/19;  7. 

Flagler,  Clement  A.  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Oct.  9/18. 
Fleming,  Arthur  S.— Jd.  March  11/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  8/19. 
Rivers,  W.  C— Jd.  Oct.  14/18;  6,  7;  Trfd.  March  10  19. 

Lieutenant  Colonel: 

Dunn,  William  E. — Jd.  May  10/19;  7. 

Majors: 

Byrne,  M.  J.— Jd.  in  LT.  S.;  Brigade  Adjutant;  Trfd.  June  23/18. 
Magruder,  John— Jd.  June  24/18;  2,  3,  6;  Brigade  .Vdjutant;  Trfd.  Oct.  26/18. 
Miller,  George  L.— Jd.  Nov.  15/18;  7;  Brigade  Adjutant;  Trfd.  Dec.  26/18. 
Ruoff,  C.  F.— Jd.  April  12/19;  7;  Brigade  Adjutant. 

Captains: 

Bailey,  R.  A.— Jd.  Jan.  29/19;  Trfd.  April  3/19. 

Brinckerhoff.  James  E. — .Id.  June  24/18;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Nov.  15/18. 

Cowgill,  William— Jd.  Oct.  7/18;  6;  Trfd.  Nov.  14/18. 


398  Ilistury  of  the  Fiflli  Divimju 

FIFTH   FIELD  A  lilll.l.KKY   HHIC;  ADF.   ]]V.\nqi\\liTVAiS—Ci,nl!n,i,'<l 

Cai'Tains: — Coiiliiiiicil 

Finney,  C.  E.— Jd.  in  I'.  S.;  2,  3.  (i,  7 ;  Trfd.  Jan.  2!l   19. 

Knoob,  E.   F.— .III.   May  7/19;  Trfd.   May   ll/lil. 

Yeager,  Enier.— .Id.  .lunc  24/18;  2,  3.  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.   12/1!». 

FiBST  Lieutenants: 

Bellinger,  Franlv  C— .Id.  Nov.   15/18;  7;  Trfd.   Mari-li   10,  ISl. 

Blodgctt,  K()l)ert  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  21/18. 

Bowle.s,  W.  B.— Jd.  Jan.  12/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  11/19. 

Boyd,  Jaek.son— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Oct.  9/18. 

Brunei,  L.  J.— Jd.  Aug.  10/18;  2,  3,  (>,  7;  Trfd.  Mar.li  12   19. 

CJerlitz,  S.  J.— Jd.  May   11/19;  7. 

Locke,  Ben  N.— Jd.  Nov.  23/18;  7;  Trfd.  April  29/19. 

Pyke,  J.  C— Jd.  April  1(» '19;  7. 

Thomp.son,  John   V.— Jd    in   I'.  S. ;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.   May  20/19. 

Walker,  Paul  N.— .Id.  .Inly  30   18;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Burns,  R.  O.— Jd.  Oct.  27/18;  «,  7;  Trfd.   May  20/19. 

Fletcher,  H.— Jd.  June  28/18;  2,  3.  (i;    I'rfd.  (ict.  21/18. 

Pennywitt,  John— Jd.  Jan.  Ihyi9;  7. 

Sproull,  E.  E.— Jd.  May  U/19;  7. 

Thomas,  W.  P.— Jd.  June  2t./18;  2,  3,  G;  Trfd.  Nov.  30   18. 


NINETEENTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonels: 

Foy,  Robert  C.-^d.  Jan.  18/19;  7. 

Lanza,  Conrad  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  22/18. 

McKinlay,  William  C— Jd.  Oct.  23   18;  G;  Trfd.   Nov.   10/18. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Carlisle,  Paul  D.— Jd.  Dec.  26/18;  7. 

Dunn,  William  E.— Jd.  Oct.  8/18;  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  2.5/18. 

Hollingsworth,  C.  P.^Jd.  Aug.  22/18;  2,  3,  ti;  Trfd.  Oct.  8/18. 

Majors: 

Brunzel,  Otto  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  2/18. 
Donaldson,  Robert  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  July  25/18. 
MacTaggart,  John  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 
Millar,  Edward  A.,  Jr.-^Td.  Feb.  17/19;  7. 
Miller,  Edward— Jd.  Dec.  26/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  .30/19. 
Schaeffer,  Frank   (M.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  24./I8;  7. 
Winton,  Alton— Jd.  in  t".  S. ;  2,  3.  (i;  Trfd.  Oct.  10/18. 

Captains: 

Adams,  John  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2.  3.  6.  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  24/18. 

Ard,  Waldo  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Baker,  Frederick  R.— Jd.  in  II.  S.;  2,  3,  li,  7;  Trfd.  May  30/19. 

Bennewitz,  Anthony  H.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  13/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  5/19. 

Beukema.  Herman— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  July  21/18. 

Blow,  Frank  T.  (.M.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  14/18;  7;  trfd.  Dec.  24/18. 

Cain,  David  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1/18. 

Culhane,  Thomas  J— Jil.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  22/19. 

Dclzell,  W.  A.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  19/18 

Dent,  Elliot  E— ,Id.  Aug.  16/19;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Dunnigan,  Francis— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  14/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  icith  the  Fifth  Division  399 

NINETEENTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY— CoH?m«(</ 

Captains: — Continued 

Greenwald,  Carl  C.-^Td.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Han.son,  Thomas  G.,  Jr. — Id.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Oct.  9   18. 

Horn,  Fred  W.   (M.C.)— .Id.  May  18/19;  7. 

Hutcliison,  Amos  M.— Jd.  Jan.  16/lS);  7. 

Ivanick,  George  A.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  fi,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  21./1S- 

James,  William  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  10/19. 

Kenan,  Dan  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Maxey,  Jesse  E.— Jd.  May  19/19;  7. 

Meyers,  Albert  A.— Jd.  May  7/19;  7. 

Pajjc,  Albert  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Nov.  1/18. 

Partridge,  Newton  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  18/19. 

Paton,  Edgar  A.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Sept.  2()yi8. 

Pence,  G.  L.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  26/18;  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.   11/18. 

Redner,  Wallace  J.— .Td.  Jan.  ()/19;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  15/19. 

Rhett,  Alton  P.— Jd.  May  2V19;  7. 

Rice,  Charles  R.   (M.C.)-^rd.  May  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  12   19. 

Rudd,  Ray  V.  S.— Jd.  May  7/19;"  7. 

Russell,  Wallace  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S, ;  2.  3,  li,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.   15   18. 

Shiigg,  R.  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  2:3/18. 

Shutter,  Arnold  W— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  fi,  7. 

Stewart,  Floyd  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Tewes,  Martin  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

WiLon,  Stanley  F.— .Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (>,  7;  Trfd.  May  9/19. 

Wing.  Paul  R.— ,Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  G,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  8/18. 

Woelffer,  John  li.   (DC.)— Jd.  in   V.  S.;  2,  .3,  (i,  7. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Anderegg,  John  S.— Jd.  in   L'.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  March  29/19. 

Aves,  Delano  R.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  15/18. 

Burns,  William  H.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Casserly,  James  C.^Id.  in  U.  S.;  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  21/19. 

Challis,"john  V.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  .Vug.  U/18. 

Cobb,  William  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Crotty,  Robert  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  II/IS. 

Davies,  Bert- Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  July  27/18. 

Fisken,  Archibald  D.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  7. 

Garland,  Chisholm— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  7;  Trfd.  May  U   19. 

Herrity,  James  B.— Jd.  Jan.  4/19;  7. 

Gilbough,  Frederic  M. — Jd.  Jan.  4./19;  7. 

Graham.  Frederick  W.  W.,  Jr.— ,Td.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i.  7. 

Hart,  Joseph  S.— .Id.  May  7/19;  7. 

Hayman,  George  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  fi,  7;  WIA  Nov.  i   18;  Not  Evac. 

Hughes,  Isaac— .Id.  Jan.  9/19;  7. 

Ives,  Stephen  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Nov.  28/18. 

Kelly,  Robert  C.^Id.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Keriian,  Redmond  F.— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 

Kolosky,  Adam  P.^Id.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  11./18. 

Latson!  Harley— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  7;  Trfd.  March  1/19. 

Levy,  Edmund  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Sept.  11/18. 

Margrave,  Edmund  D.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  March  22/19. 

Martin,  Henry  P.— Jd.  Jan.  2/19;  7. 

Menzias,  John  W. — Jd.  Jan.  14/19;  7. 

Miller,  Charles  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Mitchell.  Roland  E.  (V.C.)-Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

O'Hair,  Edgar— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Outz,  David  T.-^Id.  May  19/19;  7. 

Ray.  John   P.— .Id.  May  3/19;  7. 

Rhindress,  Leonard  B. — Jd.  Jan.  -5/19;  7. 


100  Hi^iortj  of  the  Flftli   Division 


NINETEENTH  EIELD  AUTILl.EKY— C'(v«^(«h((/ 

EiRST  LiEVTKXANTs: — Continued 

Kowlcy,   Benjamin   B.    (M.C.)— Jd.   Sept.   SL'/IS;   li;   \\IA    Sept.   22/18;   Not   evac;   Trfd. 

Oct.  23/18. 
Schantz,  J.  V.  Henry  (V.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trf.l.  .I.in.  20/19. 
Sniitli,  George  D.   (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 
Sumner,  William   B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;   WIA   Sept.  2()   18;   Uet.   Nov.  23/. 8;  Tr;';!. 

Fel).  15/19. 
Thompson,  John  V.— Jd.  May  21/19;  7. 
Tillot.son,  Edwin— Jd.  Dee.  17/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  8/19. 
Van  Ostrand,  A.  Mortimer— Jd.  Jan.  22/19;  7. 
Walker,  Willard  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  March  28/19. 
Wayahle,  Harry  C.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  14/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  30/18. 
Weakley,  Beattie  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  14/18. 
Whitl.eck,  Louis  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  B,  7. 
Wliitteken,  William  H.— Jd.  Jan.  21/19;  7. 
Wiley,  Henry  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Nov.  4/18. 
WiltVmg,  Clavel  T.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  30/18;  7. 
Willis,  Holiert  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Eel).  21/19. 
Wilmer,  Thomas  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Baird.  Raymond  C— Jd.  Sept.  13/18;  ,3,  (i,  7. 

Bancroft,  William  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  .\)iril  5/19. 

Barnard,  Herliert- Jd.  May  25/19;  7. 

Bertsche.  Walter  G.— Jd.  May  25/19;  7. 

Bowles.  William  B.— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.   14/19. 

Burns,  Robert  O.— Jd.  June  22/18;  2,  3,  fi;  Trfd.  Oct.  29/18. 

Cami.bell,  Charles  H.-^7d.  May  25/19;  7.         - 

Chamberlain,  John  P.— Jd.  Mav  25/19;  7. 

Coats,  Archibald  C— Jd.  Sept.   15/18;  (i;  GIA   Oct.  25/18;  DW  Oct.  28/18. 

Cole,  Clifford  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Oct.  18/18. 

Colless,  Charles  C— Jd.  Jan.  5/19;  7. 

Collins,  Robert  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  March  24/19. 

Davis,  Harry  V.— Jd.  Feb.  26/19;  7. 

Drew,  Jack— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Duval,  Andrew  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Fisher,  George  H.— Jd.  July  5/18;  2;  Trfd.   Aug.   19/18. 

Foisie,  Philip  S.— Jd.  in  LI.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Erear,  Perry  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  July  18/18. 

Goodwin,  EVwin  C— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (>,  7. 

Graham,  Harry  F.— Jd.  May  3/19;  7. 

Hackworth,  Trave  T.— Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7. 

Hallam,  Eric  B.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3.  6,  7. 

Hirsch,  Lee— Jd.  Sei^t.  13   18;  3.  fi,  7;  WIA  Oct    9/18;  Not  evac. 

Hungerford,  Edwin  II.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Kauftman,  F.  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.  14/18. 

Kitt.s,  I.  Leonard— Jd.  in  LT.  S.:  2,  3,  <i,  7. 

Libby,  Wallace  A.— Jd.  April  3/19;  7. 

Lobfiell,  Leighton— Jd.  Jan.  11/19;  7. 

McKvoy,  John— Jd.  Sept.  13/18;  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Oct.  fi/lS. 

McGlinn,  Thomas  F.— Jd.  Sept.  10/18;  (>,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.   1/18. 

Matthews,  Joe  G.— Jd.  Jan.  25/19;  7. 

Moran,  Francis  A.— Jd.  in  II.  S.;  2,  3,  li.  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  13    19. 

Mver.s,  Ferris  C— Jd.  in  LI.  S.;  2,  3.  li.  7;  Trfd.    \pril  ■.'2    19. 

Pollard,  Lloyd  H.— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i.  7. 

Roiierts,  Edwin  W.   (V.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  2.5    19;  7. 

Roberts.  William  C— Jd.  Jan.  22   19;  7. 

Rome,  Bernard — .Id.  .Ian.  5/19;  7. 

.Scott.  Enos  P.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7    18. 

.Scott.  Harold  W.-Jd.  Julv  14    18;  2,  .3.  6,  7. 


Officers  Who  Served  with  the  Fifth  Division  tOl 


NINETEENTH  FIELD  ARTILLERY— C'y«/iHM(« 

Second  Lieutenants: — Contimied 

Scotten,  Ward  C.   (V.C.)-^Td.  Jan.  15/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  1/19. 

Sechler,  J.  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  U/18. 

Seibold,  William  S.  (V.C.)— Jd.  April  26/19;  7. 

Slieldon,  Cliarles  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Tachau,  Charles^Jd.  Sept.  13/18;  fi,  7;  Trfd.  March  15/19. 

Van  Fleet,  George  F.— .Id.  June  27/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Walden,  Donald  M.— Jd.  April  19/19;  7. 

Welier,  Clarence  A. — Jd.  April  3/19;  7. 

Wriglit,  Thomas  L.   (V.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  U/19;  7;  Trfd.   Felj.  25/19. 


TWENTIETH  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonels: 

Corey,  John  W.  15.— Jd.  Dec.  30/18;  Trfd.  Jan.  2/19. 

Cireene,  George  R. — ,Td.  Dec.  24/18;  7. 

Payne,  Broolc-^d.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  8/18. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Carlisle,  Paul  D.— Jd.  Nov.  10/18;  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  26/18. 
Dunn,  William  E.— Jd.  Dec.  26/18;  7. 

Hollingsworth,  C.  P.— Jd.  Aug.  2/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  17/18. 
Magruder,  John— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  6;  Trfd.  Oct.  20/18. 

M.\JORs: 

Batson,  Roscoe  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  July  31/18. 

Clark,  Ciivler  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Hewitt,  Jolin  E.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Aug.  It   18;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  AjHil  16/19. 

McConkey,  Clyde  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  .luly  31/18. 

McGehee.' Schauml)iirg— Jd.  Fell.  8/19;  7. 

Miller,  George  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Nov.  15/18. 

Sands,  Ord  L.   (M.C.)— Jd.  May  2/19;  7. 

Stickney,  Whitman  G.   (M.C.)^d.  April  2/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  2/19. 

Thurber,  Phillip  L.— .Id.  in  U.  S. ;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1V18- 

White,  John  D.,  Jr.— Jd.  April  26/19;  7. 

Wyneken,  Henry  O.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  15/18. 

Captains: 

Allcott,  Philo,  Jr.— Jd.  May  8/19;  7. 

Balmat,  John  H.,  Jr.— Jd.  April  2/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  11/19. 

Batson,  E.  Farrar^Id.  Jan.  21/19;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  25,  19. 

Bell,  William  F. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  March  29/19. 

Berry,  Harry  B.— ,Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Cartwright,  Clarence   E.— Jd.   in   U.   S.;  2,  3,  6;   Trfd.   Oct.   17/18. 

Cowgill,  William  W.— .Id.  Nov.   13/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Crafts,  Leland  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  14./I8. 

Elliot,  George  H.   (D.C.)— Jd.  May  9   19;  7. 

Hollander,  Harry— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,"  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  11/18. 

Kennedy,  Joseph— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Knight," John  T.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  WIA   Se])t.   12/18;  Ret.  Sept.  27/18;  Trfd. 

April  13/19. 
Knoob,  Karl  F.  (Cav.)— Jd.  May  11/19;  7. 
McDonald,  Adrian  J.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 
McCluer,  Nathan  E.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Oct.  17/18. 
McPherson,  Orville  S.— Jd.  in  LT.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 
Metts,  Walter  A.— Jd.  April  14/19;  7. 
Michalek,  Peter  P.^d.  in  U.  S.;  2,  .3,  6,  7. 

Minear,  Virgil  L.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  GL\   Oct.  2/18;   Ret.   Oct.  20/18;  Trfd.   Dec. 
14/18. 


102  His-tor//  of  lite  Fifth  Dhisinu 

TWKNTI  KVn   FIELD  AKTILl.ERY— r,;;,//,,,,,,/ 

(^APTAlNs: — <  ''til/ inn r/ 1 

I'fiiiicy.  Louis  H. — Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  (i,  7. 

<^iiiiiiliy,  Hjiintvs  15. — J<1.   in   U.  S. ;  2,  :i,  (>,  7. 

Hcdf,  G.  Ross— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.   Aug.  7/lH. 

K.Kk,  Bertram  N.— ,Id.  in  I'.  S.;  2,  3,  li,  7. 

H(i}r.rs,  Ru.sh  J.— ,Td.   in   U.   S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

ScliiilKM-t,  Hic-liiird  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  0,  7. 

Steihel,  L.  Rol)i-rt   (M.C.)— Jd.  I<>l).  27/19;  7;  Trfd.  May    1/19. 

Taalan,  ,T.  E.— Jd.  May  22/19;  7. 

Vo.slu-II,  Mild  M.    (D.C.")— Jd.  in   V.  S. ;  2,  7. 

Weir,  William  C.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in   V.  S.;  2,  3.  (i,  7;  Fcl>.   11    19. 

Wcslon,  Eugene,  Jr. — Id.  in  V.  S. ;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd,   May   13/19. 

First  Liei'tf.nants: 

Alvfird,  Ellsworth  C— Jd.  Jan.  3/10;  7. 

.Anderson,  Harrison  F. — Id.  Nov.  17/19;  7. 

Balieoek,  Leslie  E. — Id.  in   U.  S.;  2;  GIA   Aug.   IH'IS. 

Barker,  Levitt   H.— Jd.  Jan.   17/19;   7. 

Burke,  Cecil  Fl— Jd.  May  13/19;  7. 

Burkhardt.  Harold  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3.  (i;    Trfd.  Oet.  21/18. 

Canii)hell,  Robert  A.^Id.  Jan.  2/19;  7. 

Carrifian,  ,\ndre\v,  Jr. — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2;  Trfd.  .\iig.  7/18. 

Clarke,  H.  Glen— Jd.  Jan.  4./\9;  7. 

Collins,  Alex  I..   (D.C.)— Jd.  in   L!.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  May   I.   If- 

Coulliourn,  William  C. — Id.  Jan.  .3/19;  7. 

Duboe,  Ray  B,— .Id.  Jan.  17/19;  7 

Espay,  Harold  R.— Jd.  Jan.  5/19;  7. 

Etter,  Georire- Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  G,  7. 

Flaek,  Cbarles  E.   (Cav.)— Jd.  Jan.  .5/19;  7. 

Frit/,,  B.  Seott   (A'.C.)- Jd.  May  22/19;  7. 

Gee,  Othel  J.   (M  C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  GL\  Nov.  10/18;  DSC. 

Holliday,  Samuel  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  GIA  Oet.  13/18;  Ret.  Nov.  28   18. 

Hojiper,  Ira  C— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Hoyt,  H.   Chester   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Oet.   7/18;   S,  7. 

Kaiie,  William  V.   (M.C.)— Jd.  May  2/19;  7. 

Kernan,  Harold— Jd.  in   V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Oet.   17/18. 

Killoran,  John— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2.  .3,  (i,  7. 

Knight,  Charles  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  «i,  7. 

Lattin,  Don  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Lee,  Don — Id.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Lindsay,  Cbarles— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

M.inning.  Blagden— .Td.  Nov.  10/18;  (>,  7. 

Mever,  Fred  H.  (D.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  2/19;  7. 

Miller,  Stewart  F.— Jd.  in  V.  S. ;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  May   1    19. 

Newton.  Harold  G.  (V.C.)— Jd.  .\i>ril  7/19;  7. 

Nowlan,  Harry  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;    Irfd.  Manh   13   19. 

Orr,  William  G.— ,Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Mareh  28/19. 

Pearee.  J.  Stuart  (Chaplain)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6;  Trfd.  Oct.  7/18. 

(^uicksall.  Carl  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  .3,  6,  7. 

Keininfra,  Jaeob^Id.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

liettiL',  Carl  B. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Reynolds,  Robert  P.— .Id.  in   U.  S  ;  2,  .3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.   Dee.    11,  18. 

Sanford,  Roger  A. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  r>,  7;  Trfd.  March  1    19. 

Sehl<id<er,  Raljili  W.   (V.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Selby,  Arthur  N.— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

StotJ-bik.  .hdius  V.   (V.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  4/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  28   19. 

Taylor,  Samuel  O.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  GIA  Aug.  18/18;   Kcl.  Aug.  21    18. 

Williams,  Fr.deriek  M.^Td.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Wilson,  Charles   R.    (V.C.)— Jd.  Dec.  13/18;  7. 


Officers  Who  Served  tvilh  tlic  Fifth  Division  403 

TWENTIF.TH    FIKI.D   \R'illA.¥MY—C(intinii,d 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Amlis,  Charles  F. — Id.  Nov.  7/18;  (i,  7. 

Atwood.  Flovd  J.— Jd.  Sejit.  11/18;  3,  (i,  7. 

Bellcnoit,  Oscar  L.— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Bent,  Frederick  O.— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Birch,  Clifford  W.— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Bostwick,  Robert  B.— Jd.  May  2:i/l»;  7. 

Bryant,  Walter  J.— Jd.  Sept.  11/19;  3,  6,  7;  GIA  Nov.  8/18;  Ket.  Nov.  21/18. 

Brown,  Cecil  A.^d.  Jan.  25/19;  7. 

Buchanan,  Gordon— Jd.  March   19/19;  7. 

Burns,  Koliert  O.— Jd.  May  20/19;  7. 

Cliurch,  Albert  D.— Jd.  Sept.  11/18;  3,  (i,  7;  CUA   Oct.   13    18;   Ret.   Nov.   14/18. 

Cooper,  Herbert  G.— >Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  D.c.  11./18. 

Davies,  Harold— Jd.  May  1/19;  7. 

Devoe,  Donald  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  U  18. 

Driber,  Louis  H.— Jd.  Jan.  25/19;  7. 

English,  Robert  S.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  (i,  7. 

Farrar,  Richard  J.  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Flint,  Arthur  P.— Jd.  Sept.  11/18;  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  March  11,  19. 

Fro.jen,  Enoch  A.— Jd.  Sept.  11/18;  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  22/19. 

Garcia,  Joe  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (>,  7. 

Ginther,  Richard  S.— Jd.  May  2/19;  7. 

Hope,  Herbert  W.— Jd.  July  5/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Howard,  George  E.— Jd.  No"v.  9/18;  0,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  2V19. 

Kendrick,  Hazen  W.— .Id.  Jan.  21/19;  7. 

King,  Michael  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Lacey,  George  V.— Jd.  Aug.  27/18;  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  .\i>ril  (i   19. 

McBane,  Elwood  P.   (V.C.)— Jd.  May  .5/19;  7. 

McMenomy,  Robert  L.— Jd.  Sept.  11/18;  3,  (>,  7. 

Matthews,  Stewart  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Rohwer,  Ray— Jd.  Jan.  22/19;  7. 

Sharp,  Joel  H.^d.  Jan.  27/19;  7. 

Sprankle,  Stanley  K.— Jd.  Sept.  11/18;  3,  (i,  7. 

Thomas,  Walter "P.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  7;  Trfd.  May  4/19. 

Thompson,  Paul  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  G,  7;  Trfd.  March  7/19. 

Watson,  Edward  T.— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

WMllis,  Waid  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  .3,  (i,  7. 

Williams,  Wilfred  B.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (!,  7;  Trfd.  ,Ian.  28   19. 

Wilson,  David  B.   (V.C.)— Jd.  Aug.  30/18;  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  .\|iril  23/19. 


TWENTY-FIRST  FIELD  ARTILLERY 

Colonel: 

McxMaster,  Richard  H.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  May  8/19. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Clarkson,  Herbert  S.— Jd.  Nov.  21/18;  7. 
Gay,  George  S.— Jd.  Aug.  27/18;  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Oct.  6/18. 
Jeancon,  Jean  A. — Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  G,  7;  Trfd.  May  18/19. 
Quinn,  Leo  P.— Jd.  in  IT.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 
Seaman,  George  G.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  .3,  G;  Trfd.  Nov.  5/18. 
Spence,  William — Jd.  March  25/19;  7. 

Majors: 

Doolittle,  Julius  T.  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  G,  7;  DS  Div.  Hq.  Dec.  31/18. 
Downing,  George  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  G,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  15/19. 


101.  History  of  tlic  Fifth  Division 

TWENTY-FIRST   FIKLD   AU'illA.KRY—Conthmed 

Majors: — Continued 

Holcomh,  William  S.— Jcl.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

I.uttimorc,  Beiiiauiin— Jtl.  May  1/lfl;  7. 

Miller,  Sidiuy  S.— Jtl.  Jan.  2.5   19;  7;  Trfd.  Marcli  21    IS. 

Ntbk-tt,  Htri.i-rt  C.  (M.C.)— Jd,  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i.  7. 

Schacffer.  Frank  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  20/18.  • 

Sellcek,  Clyde  A.^Td.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  27/18. 

Wallace,  John  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  20/18. 

White,  John  D.— Jd.  April  2.5/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  27/19. 

Wyche,  Ira  T.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Captains: 

Blodgett,  Robert  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2.  3,  (i,  7. 

Boom,  Carl-^Id.  Jan.  17/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  30/19. 

Blow,  Frank  T.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (>,  7;  Trfd.  May  (i/19. 

Brinkerhoff,  James— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Burns,  Edward— J d.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i.  7. 

Chase,  Ro.ss  I..  (D.C.)— Jd.  March  31/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  11/19. 

Crawford,  Wallace  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Nov.  1/18. 

Cullins,  Irwin   R.— Jd.  May  21/19;  7. 

Dunckel,  William  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  (JI.V  Sept.  24/18;  Ret.  t)ct.   1/18. 

Finley,  Harold  D.^d.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Gair,  Arthur  V.— Jd.  May  21/19;  7. 

Genung,  James  H. — .Td.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Graves,  Everett  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  li,  7. 

Greaves,  Gennad  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd    July  22/18. 

Harding,  Hugh  X— .Jd.  May  6/19;  7. 

Kuykendall.  Clav  W.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i.  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Lewis,  Hay  M.— Jd.  Jan.  16/19;  7. 

Marks,  Sumter  D.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3.  (i,  7. 

McQueen,  Isaac  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Patterson,  James  O.— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Pratt,  Harmon  C.  (D.C.)— .Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Sarge.  Frederick  (Ord.)— ,Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  28/18. 

Searight,  Hamilton  F. — Td.  in  U.  S.;  2.  3,  (i.  7. 

Siiringer,  Edward  S.— ,Td.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  .March  8/19. 

Telford,  Percy  K.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Watrous,  Raymond  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  18/18. 

Williams,  Thomas  O.— Jd.  Dec.  12/18;  7. 

Woodruff,  Victor  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Yeager,  Emer  R.— Jd.  Jan.  13/19;  7. 

FiR.ST  Lieutenants: 

Abbott,  Edwin  H.— Jd.  May  3  19;  7. 

Anderson,  John  K. — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Bailey,  William  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Bedell,  Thomas  A.— Jd.  .\pril  .51!);  7. 

Burch,  Angelus  F.— Jd.  Jan.  18/19;  7. 

Carson,  Donald  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3.  (i.  7. 

Delaney,  Frank  C.-^Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trf<l.   .March  18/19. 

Donaldson,  Warren  G. — .Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

DufFendack,  Jose  F.  (D.C.)— Jd.  Aug.  12/18;  2.  3.  6,  7;  Trfd.  March  4/19. 

Duncan,  Donald— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  March  31/19. 

Dunn,  Thomas  E.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3.  (i,  7. 

Faurote,  Guv  C— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Fliesher,  Ben  S.  (M.C.)— .Td.  March  6/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  7/19. 

Fritz,  Benjamin  S.   (V.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  18/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  21/19. 

Cierlitz,  Sylvester  J. — Td.  May  3/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  14/19- 

Hall,  Elhridge  G. — Id.  Jan.  .3/19;  7. 


'  Officers  Who  Served  zvith  the  Fifth  Division  405 

TWENTY-FI KST   FI EI.D   A IITI I  ,LE R\—Confmued 

First  Lieutenants : — Continued 

Haun,  William  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Hensley,  Lee— Jd.  Jan.  2/19;  7. 

Jacob.s,  William  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Jacobus,  Jesse  J.— Jd.  June  26   18;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  April  1  '10. 

Jarrel,  Foster  T.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  7/19;  7. 

Jones,  Lawrence  McC. — .Jd.  Dee.  7/18;  7. 

Kilbourn,  Orrin  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Ladd,  Henry  M.,  Jr.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Died  Fel).  18  19. 

Law,  Bernard  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Sept.  5/18. 

Littlefield.  Arthur  R.-J^d.  Jan.  17/19;  7. 

Locke,  Ben  N.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i;  Trfd.  Nov.  23/18. 

Marion,  Vincent  (Ord.)— Jd.  Jan.  7    19;  7;  Trfd.  April  U/19. 

Moore,  Robert  S.^d.  Jan.  17/19;  7. 

Morgan,  Woodward  H.  (Chaplain) — ,Td.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Nauts,  Herbert  W.— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  28/18. 

Neville,  Harry  O.— Jd.  Jan.  5/19;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  30/19. 

Oliver,  Robert  W.   (V.C.)-^d.  Get.  (i/18;  6,  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  22/19. 

Osterloh,  Richard  M.— Jd.  Jan.  3/19;  7. 

Robinson,  Arthur  J.^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Schwaderer.  Eugene  B.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  March  18/19. 

Scott,  Russell— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Shearer,  Paul  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Smith,  Gurney  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  fi,  7;  Trfd.  April  U/19. 

Smith,  Monte"  C.   (V.C.)-^d.  Oct.  6   IS;  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.   13/18. 

Steele,  William  C— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  U,  7. 

Stotchik.  Julius  V.  (V.C.) — Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  5/19. 

Taylor,  Luther  L.— Jd.  .Ian.  1/19;  7. 

Tennison,  Arthur  R.--Jd.  Jan.  5/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  18/19. 

Tillotson,  Edwin  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Warren,  Ross  B. — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  3,  6,  7. 

Webb,  Robert  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

West,  Lewis  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7. 

Whalen,  Thomas  F.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  1()/18. 

Woodward,  Enos  P. — Id.  in  V.  S. ;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Secoxd  Lieutenants: 

Adler,  Samuel^Id.  J.an.  24-/19;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  21/19. 

Arnold,  Daniel  G.— Jd.  Sept.  12   19;  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  30/19. 

Bieri,  Frederick  E.— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Black,  Creal— Jd.  May  27/19;  7. 

Bostick,  Benjamin— Jd.  Oct.  18   18;  (i,  7. 

Brant,  Charles  W.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2,  .3.  6,  7. 

Byerly,  Ethnund  A.— Jd.  May  2.3/19;  7. 

Craddock,  Clarence  E.— Jd.  Sept.  12/18;  3,  fi,  7. 

Craig,  Melvin  H.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.  7/18. 

Debbink,  Henry  K.— Jd.  Jan.  1/19;  7. 

Drotning,  Henry— Jd.  Sept.  12/18;  3,  fi,  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  22/19. 

Fandrich,  Victor— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  fi,  7. 

CTcrholz,  Robert  P.— Jd.  March  31/19;  7. 

Hill,  Thomas  W.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  ,\ug.  7/18. 

HoflF,  Hugh  H.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  7/18. 

Hurich,  Oscar  J.— Jd.  Oct.  18/18;  6,  7. 

Jarvis,  Leroy  O.— Jd.  Jan.  24./18;  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  5/19. 

Johnson,  William  E. — Jd.  March  31/19;  7. 

Laing,  John  W.-^Td.  Sept.  12/18;  3,  fi,  7. 

McKinley,  Reed — Jd.  Oct.  18/18;  6',  7. 

Melrose,  Paul  E. — Jd.  April  15/19;  7. 

Pennywitt,  John— Jd.  Jan.  22/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  .30/18. 


406  History  of  the  Fifih  Division 

TWENTY-FIRST   FIELD   A  KTIl.LKUY— ('»«//««( </ 

Sf:CONI)     LiKUTFNANTS: (  'l»llilllll'(l 

Kagsdiik-,  .Jack  W.— Jil.  Mari-h  31/18;  7. 

Kees,  Grovcr  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  15/18. 

Head,  Jose])li  W.— Jd.  Jan.  22/lS;  7. 

KutU-dgf,  Virgil  .V.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Siddons,  James   B.— Jd.   March  31/19;  7. 

Smitli.  I5enjaniin  H.— Jd.  March  21/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  2V19. 

Smith,  Waiter  B.— Jd.  Aug.  12/18;  2,  3,  (i,  7;  Trfd.  March  31/19. 

SprouU,  Rhner  E.— Jd.  March  31/19;  7;  Trfd.  May   17/19. 

Stecker,  Harry  M.— Jd.  Jan.  24./19;  7;  Trfd.  April  22/19. 

Steven.son,  Kenyon— ,Id.  Oct.   18/18;  (i,  7;  DS  Div.   Hq.   Marcli   10/19. 

Stiitznian,  Howard   F. — Jd.  April  5/19;  7. 

Thayer,   Norton— Jd.  in   U.  S. ;  2;  Trfd.   Aug.  7/lS. 

Traxler,  Dean  L.— .Id.  Dec.  31/18;  7. 

Weis.s,  Bernard— Jd.  Jan.  22/19;  7. 

Wester,  Heuhen— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

Whitman,  I'aul  1,.— Jd.  Nov.  7/18;  6,  7. 


SEVENTH  ENGINEERS 

Colonels: 

Adams.  Lewis  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S, :  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Se]it.  23/18. 
I'aules,  Karl  C— Jd.  in   V.  S.;  2,  3.  1,  .->,  7. 

Lieutenant  Colonel: 

Morton,  Leon  L.— .Id.  in  LI.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  t,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  (i/19. 

Majors: 

Cooi)er.  Harry  R.— Jd.  May  28/19;  7. 
Finley,  Thomas  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  13/18. 
Gesler,  Earl  E— ,Id.  in  l'.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  1/18. 
Hoge,  William  M.— .Id.  in  I'.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  1,  5,  7;  DSC. 
Kuentz,  Oscar  ().— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  July  17/18. 
Morton,  Edward  C— Jd.  in  IT.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4-,  5,  7. 
Peterson,  John  P.— ,Id.  March  20/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  2/19. 
Swan,  Wvman  R.— .Id.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  l.  5,  7;  DSC. 
Teale,  Willis  E.— ,Id.  in  L.  S.;   1,  2;  Trfd,   Aug.  31/18. 

Captains: 

Bever,  Harold  F. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  1,  5,  7. 

Brk.sher,  Lawrence  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;    Trfd.  Oct.  12/18. 

Coughlin,  Robert  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  t,  5,  7. 

Curti,  Ralph  E.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Sept.  27/18;   1,  5,  7. 

Fish,  Ciilhert  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  12/18. 

Hanson,  Elmer  C.   (D.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  13/19;  7. 

Henry,  James  C— Att.  May  2/19;  7. 

.lames,  Hamilton  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3.   1,  5,  7. 

Keller,  Walter  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  KIA  S.]it.   17    18. 

Knapp,  Willard  A.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1;  DS  Div.  lh|.  .luly  17/18. 

Laracy,  Joseph-^Id.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

La  Rov,  Herbert  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  .\ug.   19/18. 

McAdams,  Howard  R.— Jd.  in  U.  .S.;  1,  2,  .3,  4,  5,  7;  WL\  Nov.  5   18;  Not  evac;  DSC. 

Meier,  Walter  H.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  -t,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  18/18. 

Mercer,  Frank   O.— Jd.   in   U.   S.;   1.  2,  3,    1,  7;   WIA    Aug.    17 '18;   Not   evac;   WIA   Oct. 

1.5/18;  Ret.  Jan.  9/19. 
Moore,  Charles  J.— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  1;  WIA  Oct.  11./18;  DW  Oct.  16/18;  DSC. 


Officcr.s  Who  Served  rcith  the  Fifth  Division  407 

SEVENTH  ENGINEEKS-<:Vn,/,„„p,/ 
Captains: — Continued 

Oshorne,  Ernest  L.— Jd.  in   U.  S.,-  1,  2;  Trfd.   Anp    I2/1H 

Parkhurst,  Roger  W.— Jd.   Nov.   18/18;  7. 

IVter.son,  Cscar  R.— Jd.  Aufj.  2()/18;  3,  7 

Rodman    Fred  E.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  I,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April   10/19. 

Rohee,  Lawrence  H.    (M.C.)-.Td.  in   U.   S.;   1;  Trfd.  July  3/18 

Snyder    Willian,  J.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  DS  Div.  Hq.  Oct'  31   18 

Spear,  Herbert  C.-,Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7 

Van  I  oan    Willian,  S.-Jd.  Oct.  19/18,-  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  10/19 

Wenzell,  Richard  W.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7 

Winnia,  Gilbert  C— O'd.  in   U.  S.;   1,  2,  3,  4.  .5,  7 

W.xKldell,  Charles  E.— Att.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  'T„nc'2.5/18. 

First  I-ieutexants: 

Brown,  Louis  C.-Jd.  Aug.  2<i/18;  3,  4;   WI.\   Oct.   14   18;  DW  Oct    18/18 

Buck  ey,  Delmar  M.  (D.C.)-Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  Julv  11/18 

Burkhard,  Edwm  D.  (M.C.)-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  Aprir28/18 

Byers.  James  E.-,Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18         ' 

Chaney,  Adrian   B.— Jd.  Dec.   17/18;   7;  Trfd    Mav  9/19 

Cohen,  Emanuel  M.— Jd.  May  8/19;  7  -      /      • 

Craufrle,  Willian,   H.-Jd.  in   U.'s.;'l,2,  4,  .5,  7-  Trfd      \„ril    18/.q 

D-Arcy,  Mealin  E.  H.-Jd.  Sept.  2/18;  3;  Trfd    Oct   S/js'  ^ 

Daw.son    Ralph   F.(MX'.)-,Id.   Sept.   14/18;  3;   Trfd.   Se,,t.  20/18 

Eastwood,  Lews  E.-Jd.  July  24/18;  2,  3,  4,  .5;  Trfd    Nov    14/18 

Engel,  August  M.-Jd.  in   V.  S.;  Trfd.  June  29   18  '  ' 

Falanders.  Edward  M.-Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Julv  22/18 

Floyd,  Florin  W.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.'  March' 4/19 

Fluegal,  Herman— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  30/18 

Gates,  Levi  S.-Jd    in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  ,5.  7;  WIA  Nov.  10   18;  Not  evac 

G,■a,^  Joseph  ^V.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2,  4,  .5;  WIA   Oct.   14/18;  Not  eva^.;  WIA   Nov.   10   18; 

Hawk,  Glenn  C.-,Id    Sept.  19/18;  4,  7;  WIA   Oct.  21    18;  Not  evac. 
Hdlard,  John  A.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  2.5/18 
Hmton.  Thoma.s— ,Id.  Dec.  19/18-  7  '  /      ■ 

Hoe^r    Fred  J.-Jd.  Sept.  (i/18;'3,'4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  l(i/I9. 
Hood,  J.  Parke-Jd.  Dec.  17/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  (i/I9 
Hotard,  Norman  A.— ,Td.  Dec.  17   18;  7;  Trfd    Mav  '"V19 
K,n,mel,  John  M.-Jd.  Aug.  31/18;  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct    2-'/18 
Longer,  Frederick  J.— Jd.  in   U.  S.;   1,  2    3    4    .5    7 
Lunny,  William  J.-Jd.  in  U.  S. ;   1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.' 29/18 

T:S1:::;;19''-'^''    ■^"^'    ''^''-^  '•  ^'   ^-^^    ^'^^^    <>-■    'Vl^;    I...    Nov.   20/18; 
McDerniott,  Morgan  B.-Jd.  in  V.  S.;  4;  WIA   O.t.  19   18;  DW  Oct    30/19 
Mendenhall    Fred.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb    28   19-  DSC 
Mery    Jacob  L.-Jd.  Sept  2/18;  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  20   18 
Moeller,  Otto— Jd.  in  L.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4    7 

Moynihan,  Allan  J.;  Jd.  July  24,18;'2.  4.  7-   \V1  \  Oct    IS/IH-   H   t    v         i.    .o 
Murphy,  Peter-Jd.  Nov.  12/18;  7;  TrM.  Janl.,   19  '^      '   ''"'■  ""'"■  ''''• 

Nolle,  Robert  W.-.ld.  in  V.  S.;  Trfd.  June  29/18 
Peterson    Harold  J.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  Julv  8/18. 
Purcell,  Bruce-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  12/18 

Robert.s,  Stanley   (Cl,aplain)-,rd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5-  Trfd    Nov    7   18 
Ronton,  Richard   W.-.ld.  in  V.  S  ;  ,,  2;  Trfd.  Au^.  12;i8.  '''• 

Sunt,,  .Andrew  J,    (Cl,a,,lain)-.)d.   Dec.   10/18;   7;  Trfd.  Ma,-ch  29/18 
Staples,  Nayor  A.—Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7-  Trfd    Mav  7/19 
Tucker,  Willard  O.   (V.C.)-Jd.   in   V.  S.  ■   1     1    5    7 
\  an  der  Valk,  Nicholas— Jd.  in  ['    S  -  1    •>   4    .5    7" 
Vining,  Ralph  E.-Jd.  Sept.   19/18;  457""' 
^  mnedge.  Earl  W.-Jd.  April  18/18;  Trfd.  June  .5/18. 


408  Histonj  of  the  Fifth  Division   . 

SEVENTH  ENGIXEEliS— ('r)H/;HH<-(/ 

FiBST  Lieutenants: — Cantinued 

Weber,  George  P.— Jd.  Dec.  17/18;  7;  Trfd.  May  7    IH. 

Wilson,  Kifliard  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  lt/18. 

Wilson,  Cliarles  H.   (M.C.)— Jd.  July  20/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Se]it.  23/18. 

Woodman,  Carl— Jd.  Aug.  G/IS;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Ziegler,  Lorenz  H.   (D.C.)— Jd.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Abrams,  Samuel  N.— Jd.  June  3/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1/18. 
Bean,  Ellis  H.— Jd.  Feb.  18/19;  7. 
Bergeron,  Lewis  A. — Jd.  Dec.  2(i/18;  7. 
Boyce,  Charles  S.— Att.  April  22/18;  Det.  June  2.5/18. 
.      Brattain,  Paul  A.— Jd.  Jan.  31/19;  7. 

Brodil,  Joseph  L.— Jd.  July  2V18;  2,  3;  \\T.\  Se|)t.  13   18. 

Brue,  Hans  N.— .Id,  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  29/18. 

Brunei,  Louis  ,T.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2;  Trfd.  .Vug.  5,  18. 

Caldwell,  James  T.—Jd.  April  8/18;  7. 

Christine,  Gordon  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  7. 

Claypoole,  Ronald  S.— Jd.  Jan.  25/19;  7. 

CloVer,  Charles  W.— Jd.  July  2V18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  12,  18. 

Emmons,  Oliver  J.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.,  5,  7. 

Fox,  William  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  l(i/]9. 

Glatzan,  Albert  M.— Jd.  in  I'.  S.;   1,  2,  4,  7. 

Hildebrand,  H.   K,— Jd.  Jan.  29/18;   7;   Trfd.   Feb.   10/19. 

Hill,  George  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Kenworthy,  William  F.— Jd.  Feb.  10/19;  7. 

KetchuiiuEdwin  P.— Jd.  Aug.  6/18;  2;  Trfd.  Aug.   16/18. 

Leidl,  Loui.s— Jd.  July  24/18;  2,  4;  MIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Lemons,  Wendell   \'.  "( V.C.)— Jd.  July  16/18;  2,  3;   Trfd.   Sept.  20/18. 

McKinnis,  Charles— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Mahla,  William  A.— .Td.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Mills,  Hay  J.— Jd.  Feb.  1.5/19;  7. 

Millspaugh,  Kenneth— Jd.  Sept.  19/18;  4,  5;  KIA  Nav.  10/18. 

Nell,  William  B.— Jd.  Dec.  19/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  30/18. 

Parkes,  Patton  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Phillip.s,  Edward  B.— Att.  April  22/18;  Det.  June  2.5/18. 

Russel,  Henry  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4;  KL\  Oct.  14/18. 

Schoof,  Fritz— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  19/18. 

Schultz,  John  C— ,Td.  .April  18   18;  3;  Trfd,   Sept.   14/18. 

Smith,  Albert  E.— Jd.  Jan.  9/19;  7. 

Sosnowski,  Napoleon — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Sponza,  Jerome — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Stiles,  Ezra  C— Jd.  Dec.  16/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  30/18. 

Talbot,  Henry  B.— Jd.  in  U.S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  WIA   Oct.   14,  18;  Not  evac;  Trfd.  April 

10/19. 
Wogcik,  John— ,ld.  Fel).   10/19;  7. 


SEVENTH  ENGINEER  TRAIN 
First  Lieutenants: 

Murphy,  Peter— .Id.  Sept.  8/18;  3.  4,  .5;  Trfd.  Nov.  13/18. 

Vinnecige,  Earl  M',— .Id.  June  3/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  12/19. 

Second  Lieitenants: 

Abrams,  Samuel  N.— ,Id.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  5/18. 
Caldwell,  James  T.—Jd.  Dec.  18'18;  7;  Trfd.  .Vpril  9,19. 
Talbot,   Henry   B. — Id.  .\pril   9/19;   7. 


Officers  Who  Served  tvith  the  Fifth  Division  409 

THIRTEENTH   MACHINE   GUN   BATTALION 

LlEUTENAKT  CoLONEL: 

Walker,  Walton  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  T. 

Major: 

Allen,  Gilliert  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Tifd.  July  4/18. 

Captains: 

Allen,  Leven  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  GIA  Aug.  16/18. 

Cannon,  Mimucan  D. — Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Ford,  7\lexander  L.— Jd.  May  5/19;  7. 

Ha.skell,  Frank  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

McCracken,  William  G.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  9/18. 

Moroney,  Thomas  J.^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Aug.  17/18;  Ret.  Sept.  2.5/18;  Trfd. 

April  25/19. 
Stratton,  Earnest  K.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

FinsT  Lieutenants: 

Aldridge,  Charles  J.— Jd.  May  5/19;  7. 

Allen,  George  L.,  Jr.— Jd.  Oct.  19/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  3/19. 

Applegate,  Edward  M.— Jd.  May  4/19;  7. 

Brown,  Jerome  O.— Jd.  May  4/19;  7. 

Burkhalter— Jd,  in  U.  S.;  i,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  3/19. 

Cunningham,  Hugh  J. — Jd.  May  5/19;  7. 

Ehrle,  Frederick  C— Jd.  in  U."s.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

McDougal,  Edward  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  22/18. 

Mantel,  Thomas  G.  (Chaplain)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  19/18. 

Mayer,  Herbert  B. — Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  l(i/18. 

Mooney.  Ralph  E.— ,Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

Murphy,  John  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7. 

Ross,  George  T.— Jd.  May  21/18;  1,  2,  3.  4,  5,  7. 

Ross,  Minor  J.  (Chaplain)— Jd.  May  10/19;  7. 

Schneitter,  Theodore  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7 ;  Trfd.  May  4/19. 

Smith,  Harry  1,.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  GIA  Aug.  2(118;  Ret.  Aug.  22/18. 

Watts,  George  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Baker,  George  V.— Jd.  Oct.  9/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Engelking,  Lucas  J. — Td.  Nov.  14/18;  7. 

Inman,  Percy  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

McHard,  Samuel  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  WIA  Oct.  14/18. 

Mann,  John  A.— Jd.  Aug.  31/18;  3,  4;  WI.V  Oct.  14/18. 

Paradis,  Davis  C.  R.— Jd.  Feb.  2/19;  7. 

Poczontko,  Joseph  F.— Jd.  April  19/19;  7. 

Reach,  Jean  C— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  28/19. 

Shapiro,  Benjamin— Jd.  Nov.   14/18;  7;  Trfd.  March  29/19. 

Stevens.  Albert  J.— Jd.  Oct.  (i/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Terry,  Ralph  S. — Td.  Nov.  14/18;  7. 


NINTH  FIELD  BATTALION,  SIGNAL  CORPS 

Majors: 

Butler,  Edward  E.— Jd.  Dec.  2/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  1/19. 
Deems,  Irving — Jd.  March  13/19;  7. 

Hall,  Henry  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  29/18. 
Small,  Deane  B.— Jd.  Sept.  5/18;  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  21/18. 
Temple,  Hugh  H.— Jd.  Jan.  24/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  30/19. 


no  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

NINTH   FIKI.D   BATTAIJDN.  SKJNAL  VOliPS^Contiitticl 

Captains: 

Bowe,  Dennis  J.— ,I<1.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  2t/18. 

Cansler,  Louis— .Id.  M;iy  21/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  21./18. 

Dorscy,  Jolin  W. — Id.  April  9/19;  7. 

Flitcli,  John  C— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  'I'rfd.  .\ug.  21./18. 

Harri.son,  ,Iolin  \V.   (M.C.)— .Id.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7. 

Joyce.  Edward  >I. — Id.  May  21    18;  1,  2,  .'},  I,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  12/18. 

Maloney,  Kol)ert  W.— Jd.  Sept.  18/18;  Trfd.  Oct.  8/19. 

Morris," Joseph  P.— Jd.  March  13/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  29/19. 

Mun.son,  Sanuiel  H. — Jd.  April  5/19;  7. 

O'Brien,  Harry  G.— Jd.  Aug.  20/18;  2,  3,  i;  GIA  Oct.  13  18. 

Schmidt,  Kus.sell  ,\.^Jd.  April  30/19;  7. 

Staftord,  Holland  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  .5,  7;  WIA  Sept.  13/18;  Not  evac. 

SuUivfin,  Jerouie  B.— Jd.  Sept.  5/18;  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  2/19. 

Wheaton,  Robert  S.— Jd.  Nov.  11/18;  Trfd.  Nov.  24/18. 

FiBST  Lieutenants: 

Adams,  Franl^lln  G.— Jd.  Oct.  lfi/18;  -t,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  8/19. 
Allen,  Alfred  A.   (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  .3,  L  5,  7. 
Curtis,  John  K.— Jd.  Oct.  l(i ,18;  4.,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  April  .3(1   19. 
Evans,  David  W.— Jd.  May  12/19;  7. 
Finan,  Thomas  G. — Jd.  May  5/19;  7. 

Harris,  Arthur  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  11   19. 
Heitehew,  Charles  A.  \V.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  21/19. 
Lawrence,  James— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  GIA   Aug.  20/18;   Not  evac;  Trfd.   Sept.  24/18. 
Scheidell.  Edward  C.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  5,  7. 
Sherman,  Hoscoe— Jd.  in  L".  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  14/19. 
White,  Edwin  G.— Jd.  April  30/19;  7. 

Zooman,  Albert  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Oct.  29/18;  Ret.  Jan.  5/19;  Trfd. 
Jan.  1.5/19. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Cromwell,  Oliver  F.  W.— Jd.  March  14/19;  7. 

Darr,  Paul  H.— Jd.  May  14/19;  7. 

Ely,  Charles  C,  Jr.— Jd.  Oct.  4/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  5   19. 

Metcalf,  Franklin  P.— Jd.  May  9/19;  7. 

Kasmussen,  Rasmus — Id.  Dec.  20/18;  7;  Trfd.  May   15/19. 

Kichbourg,  Richard  M.— Jd.  April  2,5/18;  7. 

Seagraves,  Daniel  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  26/18. 

Stover,  Guy  Z.— Jd.  Jan.  26/19;  7. 

Williamson,  Henry  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3;  Evac.  sk.  Oct.  8   18. 


FIFTH  MILITARY   POLICE 

(Since   November    11,    1918) 
Captains: 

Burston,  Bernard  B.  (D.C.)— Jd.  May  4/19;  7. 

Fitzsimmons,  Albert  F.— Jd.  Sept.  2.5/18;  4,  .5.  7;  'I'rfd.  May  1    19. 

Freeman,  Charles  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Quinnell,  Earle  D.   (M.C.)— Jd.  March  29/19;  7. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Bowser,  Wayland  S.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4,  5,  7;  WIA  Oct.   17/18;  Not  evac;  Trfd. 

March  26/19. 
Nolan.  George  D. — Id.  Sejit.  10/18;  3,  4,  5,  7. 


Officers  Who  Served  tcith  the  Fifth  Division  411 

FIFTH    MII.ITAUY    POIACE—Coittlniied 

Second  I^ieutenaxts: 

Andrake,  John  C— Jd.  May  23/19;  7. 

Clarke,  Leo  G.— Jd.  Jan.  29/19;  7. 

Lane,  Ernest  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4-,  5,  7;  Trfd,  Feb.  1.3,  19. 

Shepard,  Barney  L.— Jd.  Jan.  8/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  9/19. 

Smith,  George  W.— Jd.  May  24./19;  T. 


FIFTH  TRAINS  HEADQUARTERS 

(Inchiding  Fifth  Military  Police  to  November  11,  1918) 
Coi.oxEi. : 

Morrow,  William  M.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  June  21/18. 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

CampbeU,  Staley  A.— Jd.  Jan.  20/19;  7. 

Comstock,  Harry  E.— Jd.  July  21/18;  2,  3,  i.  5,  7;  Trfd.  N'ov.  30/18. 

Ely,  Eugene  J.^d.  Nov.  30/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  20/19. 

Majors: 

Clark,  Dral  E.— Jd.  June  29/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  21/18. 

Gill,  William  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  10/18. 

Captains: 

Carmody,  Robert  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  May  22/19. 

Fisher.  Kussel  S.— Jd.  June  1.5/18;  1,  2,  3,  !■;  Trfd.  Oct.  23/18. 

Fitzsimnion.s,  .\lbert  F.— Jd.  Sept.  25/18;  4.,  .5;  Trfd.  Nov.  11/18. 

Hayden,  Claude  J.— Jd.  Aug.  (i/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  .5/18. 

McCracken,  William  G.— Jd.  Oct.  23/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  5/18. 

Munro,  George  N.— Jd.  July  6/18;  1,  2,  3,  4;  KIA  Oct.  15/18. 

Pearson,  Alfred  B.— Jd.  Dec.  5/18;  7. 

Stickney,  Whitman  G.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Oct.  25/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  2/18. 

Thomasson,  Eugene  W. — .Id.  in  V.  S. ;  Trfd.  June  15/18. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Bowser,  Wayland  S. — Id.  in   U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  1,  5;  Wl  A  Oct.   17   18;  Not  evac. ;  Trfd.   Nov. 

11/18. 
Butts,  Emmet  D.-^Jd.  May  4/19;  7. 
Cornish,  Grube  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Freeman,  Charles  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;   1,  2,  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.   Nov.   11/18. 
Nye,  George  E.   (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  15/18. 
Quinnell,  Earle  D.  (M.C.)^Jd.  Nov.  13/18;  7;  Trfd.  March  29/19. 
Shinn,  John  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  4   19. 
Wayhle,  Harry  C.  (M.C.)— .Jd.  Nov.  2/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  13  18. 


FIFTH  SUPPLY  TRAIN 

Major: 

Clark,  Oral  E.  (Inf.)— Jd.  June  (i,  18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Capt.\ins: 

Allen,  William   (M.C.)— Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  10/18. 

Auringer,  Harold  E.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  28/19;  7. 

Belcher,  Taylor  (Q.M.C.)-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Heyn,  Fred  L.   (Q.M.C.)-^Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  19   19. 

Lewis,  R.  Arnold   ((f  M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Seabrooke,  William  H.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 


-112  History  of  the  Fifth  Division 

FIFTH  Sl'PFLY  TRAIN*— t'o«(/n.«<'rf 

Captains: — Vonlinued 

Smith,  Ikniaiiiin  H.    (T.C.)— Jd.  Jan.  21/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  12/19. 
Swartz,  Tasso  \V.   (Inf.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 
William.s,  Adrian  D.   (M.C.)— Jd.  Oft.  3/18;  4,  5,  7. 
Yonk,  Ewold  J.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May   13,  19. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Caldwell,  John  H.  (Q.M.C.)^Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  I,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  5/19. 

Cornish,  Gruhe  B.   (Chaplain)— Jd.  Sept.  8/18;  3,  +,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  10/19. 

Hoftmastcr,  Howard  F.,  Jr.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  March  S/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  21    19. 

Howe,  William  S.   (Inf.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  8/18. 

Kilty,  Reginald  A.   (Q.M.C.)^Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  9   19. 

Lane,  Frank  R.   (Inf.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  U/19. 

Milne,  William  S.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7. 

Morris,  Joe  H.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Parker,  Dean  M.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  i,  5,  7. 

Purman,  Jo.seph  W.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Reidy,  Michael  J.   (Inf.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  29/18. 

Telford,  Percy  K.  (M.C.)— Jd.  Feb.  16/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  8/19. 

Triml)le,  Milton  E.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  I,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7. 

Ward,  Samuel  R.   (Inf.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  29/18. 

Watkins,  Ralph   (Inf.)— Jd.  May  16/19;  7. 

Wood,  Kenneth  C.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5.  7. 

Woodruff,  LeRoy  H.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  2/18. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Babcock,  Harry  S.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  Aug.  13   18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 
Badger,  Lester"  R.  (Q.M.C.)— .Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Baird,  James  E.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Blunt,  Clark.son  E,    (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  9/18. 
Boesch,  Walter  C.  (Inf.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1;  Trfd.  July  8/18. 
Cunningham,  Russell  C.  (Q.M.C.)  Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Estridge,  Arthur   (Inf.)— Jd.   May  16/19;  7. 

Gross,  Elmer  T.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Kembrough,  William  E.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  28   18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Noble,  William  F.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Purcell.  Thomas  F.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Richard,  Robert  E.  (Q.M.C.)— .Id.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Robinson,  Newton  (Inf.)— Jd.  June  7/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  13/18. 
Schriver,  Milton  R.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 
Tronstrue,  George  H.   (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  June  28/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  28/18. 


FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIN 

Lieutenant  Colonels: 

Carstarphen.  William  T.^Jd.  April  18/19;  7;  Trfd.   May  26/19. 

Cole,  Herbert  C— Jd.  March  2/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  26   19. 

Field,  Henry  M.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  1/19. 

Kieffer,  George  C— Jd.  May  26/19;  7. 

Neil,  Thomas  J.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  18/19. 

Quigley,  Frederic  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  27/19. 

Shackelford.  Robert  B.— Jd.  May  19/19;  7. 

Aaux,  Carey  J.— Jd.  June  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  3/19. 

Majors: 

Allen,  William  B.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Ashworth,  Robert  F.— iTd.  May  6/19;  7. 

Benton,  Fred  Ci.— Jd.  In  T.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  26/18. 


Officers  Who  Served  ivith  the  Fifth  Division  413 

FIFTH  SANITARY  TRAIT^i—Cnnlmued 

M  AJOHs : — <  'on I  in  ii  cd 

Brvant,  Charles  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  T;  Trfd.  April  24./T9- 

Cleland,  William  D— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Dewey,  Christian  H.-^Id.  May  6/19;  7. 

Drurv,  Dana  W.— Jd.  July  1/18;  I,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  17/18. 

Elliott,  John  D.— Jd.  June  24/18;  1,  2,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  1/19. 

Hewitt,  John  E.^Jd.  June  27/18;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

Hamilton,  Sanuiel,  Jr.,  Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  21/19. 

Hooper,  Rmmett  L.^Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  -5,  7. 

Kidd,  Alexander  R.— Jd.  Aug.  28/18;  3,  4,  5,  7. 

McFadven,  Jame.s— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3.  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  21/19. 

Norri.s,"Beniamin^rd.  Nov.  29/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.   17/19. 

Patton,  Edfjar  A.— .Id.  Sept.  28/18;  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  15/19. 

Pfeiffer,  Albert— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  27/18. 

Pool,  Eugene— >Id.  .\ug.  28/18;  Trfd.  Sept.  10/18. 

Quinn,  James  H.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5.  7. 

Robison,  John  I.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Se|)t.  14/18. 

Stephenson,  Junius  W.— Jd.  March  12/19;  7. 

Stickney.  Whitman  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7. 

Captains: 

Arnest.  Richard  T.— Jd.  May  15/19;  7. 

Bamford,  Austin  C.  (D.C.)^Td.  Feb.  21/19;  7;  Trfd.  April  1/19. 

Barlow,  E.  C— .Id.  March  4/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  10/19. 

Bennowitz,  Anthony  H.— Jd.  Dec.   1/18;  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  11/19. 

Bookmever,  Ralph  H.— Jd.  Oct.  29/18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  11/18. 

Brown,  Coleman  T.  (D.C.)- Jd.  July  22/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  3/19. 

Burns,  Ellis  P.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2.  3,  4,  S,  7;  Trfd.  May  fi/19. 

Chase,  Ross  L.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  8/19. 

Chancy,  Only  J.— Jd.  May  5/19;  7. 

Co.x,  Roy  H.— Jd.  July  17/18;  2,  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  24/18. 

Dawson.'  Ralph  E.— Jd.  June  2()/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  20/19. 

Earngev,  Willard  P.— Jd.  May  17/19;  7. 

Ehrich,' William  S.— Jd.  in  U.'s.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  18/18. 

Evans,  Raymond  M.— Jd.  May  17/19;  7. 

Paris,  William  E.^Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  1,  19. 

Farmer,  Jlyron  H.— Jd.  March  12/19;  7. 

Faucette,  Samuel  T.— Jd.  May  19/19;  7. 

Fly,  James  C— ,Id.  May  17/19;  7. 

Eraser,  Henry  E.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

French,  Edward  H.— Jd.  March  2/19;  Trfd.  March  24/19. 

Goodridge,  Frederic  G.^d.  Aug.  19 '18;  2,  3,  4.  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  2fi/18. 

Hall,  Drew  B.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Hendrickson,  Herman — Id.  July  12/18;  1,  2,  3,  4.  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  24/19. 

Hunt,  James  P.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  2-5/18. 

Lancaster,  William  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  July  22/18. 

Lang,  Nathaniel  H. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Longwell,  Benjamin  J.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  6/18. 

McCall,  .lames' H.—Jd.  June  2.5/18;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  12/18. 

McCrumb,  Ray  R.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  28/19. 

McLeod,  Alexander— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Melencamp,  Noble  E.— .Id.  Aug.  7/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Mercer,  Ray-^Id.  Sept.  16/18;  Trfd.  Sept.  21/18. 

Morton,  Edward  C— Jd.  Sept.  14/18;  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  19/18. 

MuUens,  Charles  E. — Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  20/18. 

Murphy,  Joseph  L.^Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Neuendorf,  Frank  M.— Jd.  July  4/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Newman,  Richard  J.— Jd.  May  20/19;  7. 

Norris,  Rolf  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;"l,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 


414  Histonj  of  the  Fiflli  Division 

FIFTH  SANITAKY  J'HAIN— C'onnn«P(/ 

Cai'Tains: — ('oiiliiiKi  il 

Oakley,  Gurney  O.  (S.C.)-^d.  June  21/18;  I,  2,  3,  I,  5,  7. 

Pence",  George  I,.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  7. 

Quinnell,  Earle  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4.  5;  Tifd.  X.iv.  22/18. 

Redmond,  Jolin  L.— Jd.  May  18/19;  7. 

Rowley.  Benjamin   B.— Jd.  Oct.  30/18;  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  9   18. 

Schwartz,  Seymour  C— Jd.  Oct.  2/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Sears.  Harry  E.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  3/18. 

Short,  ,Tohn"c.  (Q.M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

SteiI.el,  Loiii.s  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S  ;  1,  2,  3,  4.  5,  7;  Trfd.  April  2.5/19. 

TonoUa,  Edward  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Trask,  I.co  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1.  2,  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  2.5/18. 

Warner,  John  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  7;  Trfd.  April  19/19. 

Watson,  Archie  C— Jd.  Jan.  22/19;  7. 

Wells,  James  R.— Jd.  June  26/18;  1,  2,  3. 

Wilhite,  Lee  R.— ,Td.  May  7/19;  7. 

Williams,  Adrian  D.— Jd.  Aug.  28/18;  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  3/18. 

Williams,  Thomas  O.— Jd.  Nov.  23/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  13/18. 

Woodruff,  I.eroy  H.— Jd.  Oct.  3/18;  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  2/19. 

Young,  Charles  "H.—Jd.  May  21   19;  7. 


First  Lieutenants: 

Boudreau,  Eugene  N.— Jd.  Sept.  13   18;  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  20/18. 

Clavpool,  Harlan  G.— Jd.  May  17/19;  7. 

Corhett,  Lacy  W.— Jd.  March  4/19;  7;  Trfd.  .\pril  27/19. 

Curti.  Ralph's.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Scjit.  24/19. 

Ernest,  Giftord   (Chaplain)— >Id.  Aug.   10   18;  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7. 

Fletcher,  George  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  22/18. 

Flint,  Oliver  J.— Jd.  Jan.  21/19;  7. 

Green,  George  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  l(i/18. 

Hand,  Thomas  E.   (D.C.)— Jd.  Feh.  15/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  .5/19. 

Harmon,  Charles  M.— Jd.  Sept.  1/18;  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  24/18. 

Hart,  Frank  R.— Jd.  March  3/19;  7. 

Hawes,  George  F.^Jd.  Sept.  21/18;  Trfd.  Oct.  11    18. 

Hendricks.  Francis  G.— Trfd.  March  .5   19;  7;  Trfd.  March  14   19. 

Hilldrup,  Don  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5;  Trfd.  Nov.  4/18. 

Horton,  Guv  L.  (D.C.)— Jd.  July  12  '18;  1.  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  13/19. 

Hvson,  Garrett  L.— Jd.  July  1.5/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept,  20   18. 

Jarrell,  Foster— ,Td.  Jan.  10/18;  7;  Tfrd.  VeU.  7    19. 

Lupton,  Irving  M.— Jd.  July  1.5/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  20/18. 

Magce,  Richard  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1;  Trfd.  June  24/18. 

Phillips.  Francis  A.— .Td.  Jan.  22/19;  7;  Trfd.   May   11/19. 

Proper,  Byron  S.   (D.C.)— ,Td.  Aug.  14/18;  2.  3,  4.  .5.  7;  Trfd.  March  4/19. 

Reddy,  w'illiam  G,— Jd.  Aug.  7/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.   Sept.  20/18. 

Riley,  Fred  P.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

Scher,  Maxwell— Jd.  July  21/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7.  ' 

Simpson,  Harry  M.— Jd.  Aug.  5/18;  2,  3,  4,  5;  Trfd.   Nov.  28/18. 

St.  Pierre.  Henri  E,   (S.C.)— Jd.  Fel).  14/19;  7. 

Temple,  Arthur  H.—Jd.  Sept.  21/18;  Trfd.  Oct.   11/18. 

Thomas,  Frank  D.— .Id.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  27/18. 

Thomjikins,  James  F. — Jd.  March  2/19;  7. 

Vandament,  Walter  R.— Jd.  Jan.  25/19;  7;  Trfd.  March  Ki   19. 

Wayhle,  Harry  C— Jd.  Oct.  27  18;  5,  7;  Trfd.  Jan.  11/19. 

Weaver,  Maurice  S.— Jd.  in  V.  S.;  1,  7;  Trfd.  May  7/19. 

White,  Clarence  H.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3;  Trfd.  Oct.  2/18. 

Wilson,  Charles  H.— .Td.  in  U.  S. ;  1,  2,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dee.  14/18. 

Yoho.  Charles  E.— Jd.  Sept.  2/18;  3.  4,  5;  Trfd.  Nov.  29/18. 


Lieutenant  Colonels: 


Officers  Who  Served  rcifh  the  Fifth  Division  415 

FIFTH  AMMUNrriON   TRAIN 


Comstock,  Harry  E.-^d.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  July  21/18 
West,  R.  John^d.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  i;  Trfd.  Oct,' 25/18. 

Majors: 

Barker,  Frederick  A.— ,Td.  Aug.  10/18;  2,  3.  1;  Trfd    Oct   -'3/18 
Canipliell,  Stalcy  A.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  July  18/18 
Dickson,  Rayniond-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  ,5,  6,  7;  Trfd    Jan    "7 '19 
Hoiiser,  Orra  L.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  .5,  T. 
Lorch,  Robert  B.—Jd.  Aug.  19/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept   2G/18 
Lysaght,  James  R.— Jd.  May  7/19;  7. 

Captains: 

Bacon,  John  F.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4.  .5,  7;  Trfd.  April  28/19 

Brinckerhoff,  James  E.— ,ld.  Nov.  18/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec    8/18 

Cowart,  Walter  G.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  7. 

Dickey,  Paul  B.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  March  19/19 

EUiott,  Benjamin  R.— Jd.  Aug.  24/18;  3,  (J;  Trfd.  Oct.  14/18 

Gaines,  William  F.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  7. 

Gentzkow,  Cleon  J.  (M.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7 

Kirkpatrick,  Daniel--,Td.  May  fi/19;  7. 

Lees,  Walter  L.— Jd.  in  IT.  s.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  May  7/19 

Magee,  Richard  S.   (M.C.)— ,Jd.  March  11/19;  7. 

Menozes,  Harry  E.— .Td.  May  18/19;  7.  ' 

Newsome.  John  P.— Jd.  in  u'.  S.;  2.  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Fel)    11/19 

Parker,  Homer  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd    Feb    11/19 

Pawinski,  Eugene  J.  (D.C.)— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2.  3,  4   5   7 

Pearson,  Abe  B.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3;  Evac.  .sk.  Sept'  1.5/18 

Reese,  John  D.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3.  6,  7;  Trfd.  May  lG/19. 

Reidy,  Michael  J.— Jd.  Aug.  2fi/18;  3,  6,  7 

Roads,  George  M.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7;  Trfd.  April  8/19 

Sloan.  Paul  M.-,Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  May  14/19 

Snyder  Charles  R    (M.C.)-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;- Trfd.  March  5/19. 

Sokcl,  Louis  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  4,  6,  7. 

Sternhagen,  Joseph — Jd.  .\pril  23/19;  7. 

Swartz,  Tasso  W.— ,Jd.  Aug.   19/18;  2,  3,  fi,  7 

Ward,  Samuel  R.— Jd.  Aug.  2()/18;'3.'6,'7;' Trfd    May  "1/19 

Westbrook.  William— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4;  Trfd    Oct  ■'">'18 

Woodson.  Ryland  D.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd"jan    28/19 

^oung,  Cyrus  G.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd.  Aug    6/18 

Young,  Roger  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Bennett,  William  H.— Jd.  in  I'.  S.;  2,  3,  G,  7. 

Bisbee,  Frank  D.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  2;  Trfd. 'Aug.  20/18. 

Butts,  Emmet  D.-^d.  April  6/19:  7;  Trfd.  May  3/19. 

Chapman,  John  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6. 

Corbett.  Sidney— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7;  Trfd.  May  21/19 

Haskell.  Weston  B.—Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 

Hawkins,  Benjamin— Jd.  Nov.  22/18;  7;  Trfd    March  31/19 

Howard.  Thomas  D.-Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3.  4,  5,  7;  Trfd    May  28 '19 

Lackland,  Rufus  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7.  " 

Magee,  Robert  B.—Jd.  May  15/19;  7     '     ' 

Marcus,  Carlton  P.-Jd.  Aug.  11/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Sept.  14/18 

Murphy,  Edward  P.  (Chaplain)-Jd.  Dec.  27/18;  7;  Trfd    May  16/19 

Owen,  Robert  H.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2.  3.  6,  7 

Paine,  Charle.s-,7d.  Aug.  21/18;  2,  3.  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  30/18 

Smith,  Andrew  J.— Jd.  Nov.  20/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  8/18 


416  Histori/  of  the  Fiflh  Division 

FIFTH   AMMUNITION  'YUM'S— Continued 

First  Lieutenants: — Cimtiiniftl 

Stevenson,  Byrle  B.-^Til.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  6,  7. 
Tinsley,  William— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  2,  3,  !•,  5,  7. 
Webb,  Thomas  R.— Jd.  May  KJ/IS);  7. 
Wendt,  Herbert  C— Jd.  May  14/19;  '?. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Anderson.  Aaron  J. — Jd.  May  17/19;  7. 

Baruth,  Bernard  K.— Jd.  Nov.  29/18;  7. 

Bose,  William  C— Jd.  Nov.  29/18;  7. 

Cooley,  James  W.— Jd.  May  16/19;  7. 

Hell,  "Elmer  A.— ,Td.  Nov.  27/18;  7. 

Hunt,  Worley  W.— Jd.   Nov.  27/18;  7. 

Keller,  David"  A.  (V.C.)— ,Jd.  Sept.  27/18;  (i,  7. 

Kimball,  Douglas  E.— Jd.  Oct.  17/18;  4,  5,  7. 

Malton,  John  P.— Jd.  May  16/19;  7. 

Moyer,  Albert  F.— Jd.  Dec.  4/18;  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  21/18. 

Ross,  William  M.— ,Td.  in  U.  S.;  2,  3,  4;  Trfd.  Oct.  23/18. 

Watts,  Troy— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  2,  .3,  6,  7. 

Williams,  Vvillard— Jd.  ,Ian.  5/18;  7;  Trfd.  Feb.  18/19. 


FIFTH   MOBILE  ORnX.WCF,   REP.\IR   SHOP 

Captains: 

Chesley,  Harry  W.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  June  28/18. 

Ennis,  Perry  E.— Jd.  July  30/18;  2,  3,  4,  5,  7 ;  Trfd.  Jan.  22/18. 

First  Lieutenants: 

Barnes,  George  S.— Jd.  June  21/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7. 
Browne,  Kenneth  J.— Jd.  in  U.  S. ;  Trfd.  July  31/18. 
Her.shey,  Rus.scll  M.  L.— Jd.  July  3(I'1H;  2,  3,'  6,  7. 

Second  I^ieutexants: 

Corley,  John  S.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  Trfd.  Julv  31/18. 
Wrigiit,  Waldo  C— Jd.  April  13/19;  7. 


FIFTH   MOBILE  VETERINARY  SECTION 

First  Lieutenants: 

Clarke,  Harold— Jd.  Sept.  19/  18;  4,  5.  7;  Trfd.  March  20/19. 

Cox,  Clifford— Jd.  March  14/19;  7. 

Smith,  Monte  C— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2;  Trfd.  Aug.  1/18. 

Second  Lieutenant: 

Tucker,  Willard  C— Jd.  July  13/18;  2,  3;  Trfd.  Scj.t.   19/18. 


MOTOR   TRANSPORT  CORPS 

SERVICE  PARK   UNIT  322 
FitisT  Lieutenant: 

Fred  V.  Carney— Jd.  June  19/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  .5,  7. 


SERVICE  PARK  UNIT  393 
First  Lieutenant: 


Wesley  Ggden-TTd.  Sept.  12/18;  3,  4,  5,  7. 


Officers  Who  Served  xmth  the  Fifth  Division  417 

SERVICE  PARK  UNIT  395 
First  Lieutenant: 

Carl  A.  Windisch — Jd.  March  19/19;  7. 


QUARTERMASTER  UNITS 

SALES  COMMISSARY  UNIT  302 
FiBST  Lieutenants: 

Catozzi,  Alfred  H.— Att.  April  5/19;  7. 

Crandall,  Fred  R.— Att.  Dec.  27/18;  7;   Det.  April   1/19. 

Kennedy,  Frank  C— Jd.  April  1/19;  7. 

Second  Lieutenants: 

Gies,  George  D.— Jd.  in  U.  S.;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7;  Trfd.  Dec.  27/18. 

CLOTHING  UNIT  30-1 
Second  Lieutenant: 

Hawthorne,  Adoniram  J.— Jd.  Sept.  4./18;  3,  4,  5,  7. 

CLOTHING  AND  BATH  UNIT  323 
Second  Lieutenants: 

Collins,  Robert  C— Jd.  Jan.  13/19;  7;  Trfd.  May  18  19. 
Payson,  Arthur  H.— Jd.  May  18/19;  7. 

MOBILE  LAUNDRY  COMPANY  319 
Second  Lieutenant: 

Swanson,  Clarence  O.— .Id.  May  26/19;  7. 

SALVAGE  UNIT  301 
Second  Lieutenant: 

Wilder,  Frank  B.,  Jr.— Jd.  May  10/18;  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7. 

SALVAGE  UNIT  303 
Fihst  Lieutenant: 

Weitznian,  Andrew  J. — Jd.  May  1,5/19;  7. 

BAKERY  COMPANY  322 
Second  Lieutenant: 

Maple,  Delmar— Jd.  Jan.  10/19;  7. 


CONSTITUTION 

OF 

"THE  SOCIETY  OF  THE  FIFTH  DIVISION,  UNITED 

STATES  ARMY,  VETERANS  OF  THE 

WORI>D  WAR" 

I.  Name 

The  name  of  this  society  shall  he:  "The  Society  of  the  Fifth 
Division,  United  States  Army.  ^"eteI■ans  of  the  World  War." 

II.  Object 

The  ohjects  of  this  Society  shall  be: 

(a)  To  perpetuate  and  memorialize  the  valiant  acts  and  patri- 
otic deeds  of  the  Fifth  Division:  to  electrify  and  unify  that  invisible 
curi'cnt  of  fellowship,  friendship  and  conn-adeship  moulded  in  the 
throes  of  war,  and  promote  the  interests  and  welfare  of  the  members 
of  the  Society. 

(b)  To  publish  and  preserve  the  history  of  the  accomplishments 
of  the  Fifth  Division  and  set  forth  the  gallant  and  heroic  deeds  of  its 
officers  and  men. 

III.  Membership 

iSIembcr.shijj  in  this  Society  shall  be  of  three  kinds,  xVctive,  Honor 
and  Honorary. 

(a)   Active  Members: 

1.  Those  Avho  served  honorably  as  meml)ers  of  the  Fifth  Divi- 
sion prior  to  the  Sig-nature  of  the  Peace  Treaty  of  the  World  War  are 
elio-ible  to  become  active  members  of  this  Society. 

•2.  CiiAKTER  [Members:  Those  eligible  to  become  active  mem- 
bers who  join  the  Society  on  or  before  June  80,  1919,  shall  become 
and  be  known  as  Charter  Members. 


420  Hisiorij  of  the  Fifth  Bivimm 

.'J.  Lu'E  INIembees:  On  payment  of  ten  dollars  (!j>10.00)  all 
wild  are  eligible  to  heeoine  aetive  members  shall  beeome  and  be  known 
as  Life  Members. 

(b)  Honor  Members: 

Those  members  of  the  Division,  killed  in  aetion  or  who  have 
died  as  the  resnlt  of  wounds  reeeived  or  disease  eontraeted  (prior  to 
the  signature  of  the  Peaee  Treaty  of  the  \\^)rld  \Var)  in  honorable 
service,  shall  be  carried  on  the  records  of  the  Society  as  Honor 
Members  and  the  nearest  living  relati\e  shall  be  furnished  with  a 
certificate  of  such  Honor  Membershit. 

(c)  Honorary  Members: 

1.  x\ll  members  of  the  American  Ked  Cross,  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association,  Knights  of  Columbus  and  Salvation  Armj', 
or  any  other  welfare  organization,  who  served  honorably  overseas 
under  assignment  to  the  Fifth  Division  prior  to  the  signature  of  the 
Peace  Treaty. 

2.  Any  other  persons  whom  the  Society  may  elect. 
Honorarj"  members  are  not  retpiired  to  pay  dues  and  are  not 

entitled  to  vote. 

IV.    ()r(!AN1ZATION 

1.  Officers:  The  following  ofKcers  shall  be  elected  annually  by 
a  majority  vote  of  the  active  membei's  pi-esent  at  the  annual  meet- 
ing in  person,  by  j^roxy  or  by  mail,  each  active  iiieniber  in  good 
standing  having  one  vote,  voting  to  be  by  ballot: 

President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Ti-easurer 
Historian 

and  such  honorary  officers  as  the  Society  may  elect. 

President:  The  President  (or  in  his  absence  the  Vice-Presi- 
dent) shall  preside  at  the  meetings  of  the  Society.  He  shall  be 
resjionsible  for  the  administration  of  the  Society  in  all  its  functions 
and  imdertakings. 

Vice-President:  The  "N^ice-President  shall  perform  the  duties 
of  President  in  the  absence  of  that  official. 

Secretary-Treasurer:  The  Secretary-Treasurer  shall,  in  addi- 
tion to  his  other  duties,  be  the  Statistical  Officer  of  the  Society, 
being  i-esponsible  among  other  things   for  keeping  a  complete  and 


Constitution   of   the   Socict//   of   the   Fifth    Division         421 

up-to-date  tile  of  tlie  luiines  and  addresses  of  the  members  of  the 
Society  and  the  parties  with  whom  the  Society  deals;  he  shall  also 
be  res])oiisible  for  keeping  a  separate  list  showing  the  members  by 
gron])s  in  tlie  several  localities  in  wjiich  thej'  live  and  the  sub-societies 
or  sections  into  which  they  organize.  He  shall  be  responsible  for 
keeping  the  minutes  of  all  the  meetings  of  the  Society;  shall  keep  a 
file  of  all  correspondence  of  the  Society  and  shall  be  responsii)le  for 
conducting